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Fri Jan 25, 2019, 07:58 PM

Can a Vice President get indicted?

... just asking for a friend ...LOL

20 replies, 903 views

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Arrow 20 replies Author Time Post
Reply Can a Vice President get indicted? (Original post)
Miigwech Jan 2019 OP
RockRaven Jan 2019 #1
SWBTATTReg Jan 2019 #2
LiberalArkie Jan 2019 #7
hlthe2b Jan 2019 #9
FakeNoose Jan 2019 #17
onenote Jan 2019 #3
Siwsan Jan 2019 #4
Sneederbunk Jan 2019 #5
dameatball Jan 2019 #6
hlthe2b Jan 2019 #8
ArnoldLayne Jan 2019 #13
hlthe2b Jan 2019 #14
ArnoldLayne Jan 2019 #15
hlthe2b Jan 2019 #16
ArnoldLayne Jan 2019 #18
hlthe2b Jan 2019 #19
ArnoldLayne Jan 2019 #20
The Velveteen Ocelot Jan 2019 #10
jberryhill Jan 2019 #11
berni_mccoy Jan 2019 #12

Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 07:59 PM

1. Wasn't Spiro Agnew?

Pence should be old enough to remember that...

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:00 PM

2. I don't think Agnew got indicted but someone else here might know...

Dec 21, 2010 · SPIRO AGNEW SCANDAL. After Nixon and Agnew were elected to a second term, Agnew became the focus of an investigation by the U.S. Attorney’s office in Maryland for financial irregularities while he held state office. Rather than face trial, Agnew resigned and entered a plea of no contest to charges of evading income tax.

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:01 PM

7. Agnew

Beginning in early 1973, Agnew was investigated by the United States Attorney for the District of Maryland on suspicion of criminal conspiracy, bribery, extortion and tax fraud. Agnew took kickbacks from contractors during his time as Baltimore County Executive and Governor of Maryland. The payments had continued into his time as vice president. On October 10, 1973, after months of maintaining his innocence, Agnew pleaded no contest to a single felony charge of tax evasion and resigned from office. Nixon replaced him with House Republican leader Gerald Ford. Agnew spent the remainder of his life quietly, rarely making public appearances. He wrote a novel and a memoir that both defended his actions.

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:03 PM

9. Only because he agreed to resign and plead no contest to a tax chage minutes before he was to

be hauled into court on multiple charges.

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:29 PM

17. Well, he knew he was guilty

They had him by the short hairs. He pleaded nolo contendere (no contest) on his charges in Maryland. I'm sure Nixon told him he had to resign, but somebody on DU might know something I don't. Nixon already had his own problems to deal with, and he didn't want to shield Agnew along with it.

The one good thing about Agnew's resignation, it brought Gerald Ford to the Vice Presidency. He actually wasn't a bad guy, even though I would have never voted for him myself.

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:00 PM

3. yes

Spiro Agnew.

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:00 PM

4. Somebody would have to find Pence, first. And then wake him up.

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:00 PM

5. You could ask Agnew if he was available.

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:00 PM

6. My friend said yes. He had to ask his mother first, but still.....

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:02 PM

8. Spiro Agnew's prosecutors certainly thought so. His last second resignation "deal" was

literally completed minutes before charges were to be filed in court. He did ultimately plead no contest to a tax charge.

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #8)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:13 PM

13. Did they call it Nolo Contendere or something like that

I was only 16 years old in 1973.

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Response to ArnoldLayne (Reply #13)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:15 PM

14. nolo contendere (Latin for "no contest")

so yes, no contest on the one tax charge

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #14)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:19 PM

15. Ok thank you I remembered it was something like that. It's

Been 46 years. To much Pink Floyd, ELP, Led Zeppelin and Jethro Tull and other things back in 73-75.

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Response to ArnoldLayne (Reply #15)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:25 PM

16. Listen if you can to Rachel Maddow's podcast on this, called "Bag Man"

Excellent and no, I didn't remember any details prior to that either....

There are so many similarities between then and now, it is just amazing.

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #16)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:33 PM

18. So you were a teenager too around Watergate 1973-75.

Those were some good times hlthe2b weren't they. Deep Purple, Robin Trower, Kiss, Queen and of course David Bowie. But Pink Floyd was and still is my favorite.

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Response to ArnoldLayne (Reply #18)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:39 PM

19. pre-teen... Yes, my early musical awakening started in 1968, but only got better into that period.

I still have an enormous music playlist on my iphone that features music from that period, almost exclusively.

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #19)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:53 PM

20. Mine too in the late 60's I was a Preteen Boy with 5 older

Sisters that turned me on to The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Animals and The Byrds. But in the 70's I was getting into more of the British Progressive Rock that was coming out in the early to mid 70's.

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:05 PM

10. Yes.

Just ask Spiro Agnew. Although tried to argue that a VP couldn't be indicted, it was obvious that he didn't have much of an argument so he he entered into a plea bargain, resigned as VP, and ended up pleading no contest to tax evasion.

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:06 PM

11. Spiro Agnew

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Response to Miigwech (Original post)

Fri Jan 25, 2019, 08:06 PM

12. Yes, already precedence for it.

 

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