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Sun May 19, 2019, 06:33 PM

Suffragist Appreciation Thread: 19th Amendment Passes the House, May 21, 1919.




I know it's a few days early, but please remember to wear some combination of white, green, purple, and blue, the official colors of the movement.

I'll be wearing my HRC 2016 campaign chic scarf in the movement colors.




https://history.house.gov/Historical-Highlights/1901-1950/The-House-s-1918-passage-of-a-constitutional-amendment-granting-women-the-right-to-vote/

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Reply Suffragist Appreciation Thread: 19th Amendment Passes the House, May 21, 1919. (Original post)
lapucelle May 2019 OP
BigmanPigman May 2019 #1
lapucelle May 2019 #6
sheshe2 May 2019 #2
lapucelle May 2019 #3
sheshe2 May 2019 #4
Hortensis May 2019 #15
lapucelle May 2019 #19
Hortensis May 2019 #22
lapucelle May 2019 #5
llmart May 2019 #10
sheshe2 May 2019 #12
lapucelle May 2019 #18
llmart May 2019 #20
lapucelle May 2019 #21
George II May 2019 #7
lapucelle May 2019 #8
mcar May 2019 #9
Lucky Luciano May 2019 #11
lapucelle May 2019 #17
Cha May 2019 #13
ehrnst May 2019 #14
lapucelle May 2019 #16

Response to lapucelle (Original post)

Sun May 19, 2019, 06:44 PM

1. Man, I AM SO STUPID!



Now I know why the protests are on Tues., May 21st and not the weekend...it is this date that the STOP THE BANS (on abortions) protest organizers were focusing on when planning the events.

https://www.stopabortionbans.org/naral/?source=naral&s=0

Check to see if one of the 300 protests are near you. More cities are being added so keep checking the link.

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Response to BigmanPigman (Reply #1)

Sun May 19, 2019, 07:47 PM

6. NO! You are very far from stupid.

I happened to hear it on the news or I wouldn't have remembered.

Here's a link to the ratification timeline. The next big day is June 4, the day that it passed the Senate,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nineteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution#Ratification_timeline

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Response to lapucelle (Original post)

Sun May 19, 2019, 07:08 PM

2. Iconic Photograph of Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman-Hughes Recreated Over 40 Years Later





https://www.makers.com/blog/iconic-photograph-gloria-steinem-and-dorothy-pitman-hughes

Thanks for the reminder. Dayum that scarf is beautiful, lapucelle.

Thanks to the suffragettes.

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Response to sheshe2 (Reply #2)

Sun May 19, 2019, 07:14 PM

3. I wore that scarf to work on January 20, 2017.

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Response to lapucelle (Reply #3)

Sun May 19, 2019, 07:16 PM

4. Sweet.

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Response to lapucelle (Reply #3)

Mon May 20, 2019, 09:02 AM

15. I wore mine to on election day 2018.

Yours is far prettier (love it!). Mine has little figures, including donkeys in heels and lipstick, that you have to actually peer at to make out. Now it says we've come a long way, baby, but not nearly far enough.

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Response to Hortensis (Reply #15)

Mon May 20, 2019, 07:46 PM

19. My scarf was campaign swag that was gifted to me

for having traveled out of state on weekends to work the PA ground game.

It's such a bittersweet memory.

Post a picture of your scarf if you have the time!

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Response to lapucelle (Reply #19)

Mon May 20, 2019, 08:01 PM

22. Yes, bittersweet but extra special

in your case. Mine was mostly just another way of making a donation but hangs inside my closet door now instead of being tucked away. I’ll see if I can find a picture.

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Response to sheshe2 (Reply #2)

Sun May 19, 2019, 07:28 PM

5. Both photos are incredible.

Forget "this is what 40 looks like"...

This is what feminism looks like.

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Response to sheshe2 (Reply #2)

Sun May 19, 2019, 09:00 PM

10. I was privileged to hear Gloria speak about ten years ago.

The auditorium was packed. Not one empty seat. I was mesmerized at how vivacious she still was. Now it's hard for me to believe that she's 85.

I've been a lifelong feminist since I was about 16, and she was always one of my idols. I still remember buying the very first issue of Ms. magazine.

We must always remember that many courageous women have been fighting for women's rights for generations.

Younger women must keep the fight alive! Resist and persist!

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Response to llmart (Reply #10)

Sun May 19, 2019, 09:18 PM

12. 85. Wow.

Amazing as all her/our sisters were.

This comes to mind.

Though I know I'll never lose affection
For people and things that went before
I know I'll often stop and think about them
In my life, I love you more
Though I know I'll never lose affection
For people and things that went before
I know I'll often stop and think about them
In my life, I love you more
In my life-- I love you more

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Response to llmart (Reply #10)

Mon May 20, 2019, 07:43 PM

18. She's a remarkable woman.

What I remember from the 1970's is that so many people were surprised that she was also attractive and had no problem expressing that surprise out loud.

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Response to lapucelle (Reply #18)

Mon May 20, 2019, 07:48 PM

20. She was once a Playboy bunny.

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Response to lapucelle (Original post)

Sun May 19, 2019, 07:58 PM

7. The National Archives Celebrates the 19th Amendment

WASHINGTON, April 17, 2019 — This May, the National Archives will unveil a new major exhibit to mark the centennial anniversary of the 19th Amendment and its impact on our nation’s history. Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote will be the cornerstone of the agency’s celebration of the historic amendment. In addition, throughout the centennial observance, the National Archives will present a range of public programs and education programs and engage the public through social media.

Deputy Archivist of the United States Debra Steidel Wall said that the exhibit commemorates the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment “by looking beyond suffrage parades and protests to the often-overlooked story behind the landmark moment in American history.”

“This fuller retelling of the struggle for women’s voting rights uses the agency’s records to illustrate the dynamic involvement of American women across the spectrum of race, ethnicity, and class to reveal what it really took to win the vote for one half of the people,” Wall added.

Wall, a member of the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission, reflected on the importance of the 19th Amendment in her blog post, “Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote” on the blog of the Archivist of the United States.

“One of the special things about working in an archives is the opportunity to see original records in the course of your work,” Wall wrote. “Recently, I had the chance to view the original 19th Amendment. I reflected on how this unassuming-looking document, many messy decades in the making, empowered millions of women to step closer to equality in all aspects of American life, and, how the records we hold at the National Archives reflect that journey.”

The Rightfully Hers exhibit will be complemented by a traveling exhibit called One Half of the People: Advancing Equality for Women; pop-up exhibits for schools and other venues; a range of public programs and education programs; an active social media campaign; and robust digital engagement activities on our websites and other platforms.

The National Archives will also host a range of public programs and education programs centered on the 19th Amendment and powerful women and their roles in our nation and its history. Two recently held events—about feminism and a former First Lady—are the first in a series of scheduled programs that will highlight the roles of influential women in our nation’s history.

In an author lecture held at the National Archives on March 26, 2019, Katherine M. Marino shared her book, Feminism for the Americas, which chronicles the dawn of the global movement for feminism and women’s rights in the first decades of the 20th century. Marino’s book introduced a cast of remarkable Pan-American women who drove a transnational movement that advocated women’s suffrage, equal pay, maternity rights, and broader self-determination. These efforts led to the enshrinement of women’s rights in the United Nations Charter and the framework for international human rights. To view the entire program, see Feminism for the Americas: The Making of an International Human Rights Movement.

Then on May 5, 2019, the National Archives invited journalist and author Susan Page to share her new biography of the former First Lady Barbara Pierce Bush, one of the most storied women in American political history. Page, the Washington Bureau Chief of USA Today, traced Barbara Bush’s life from growing up in Rye, New York, to becoming America’s First Lady. Page’s book, The Matriarch, sheds new light on the political powerhouse, Bush family matriarch, former First Lady, and celebrated public servant. The author shared that while Barbara Bush’s own political beliefs sometimes differed from her husband’s, she nevertheless became an astute political campaign strategist, helping him to gain the nomination and win the White House. To view the entire program, see The Matriarch: Barbara Bush and the Making of an American Dynasty by Susan Page.

For a full list of future scheduled events, see the National Archives Calendar of Events. Related planned programs coming this month include a Voting Rights Escape Room for Adults, a forum titled For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics, and an author talk about Sandra Day O’Connor, An American Life.

The new exhibit opens on May 10, 2019, and runs through January 3, 2021, in the Lawrence O’Brien Gallery at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Admission is free and open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote is presented in part by the National Archives Foundation, the National Archives' non-profit partner organization, through the support of Unilever, Pivotal Ventures, Carl M. Freeman Foundation in honor of Virginia Allen Freeman, AARP, AT&T, Ford Motor Company Fund, Facebook, Barbara Lee Family Foundation Fund at the Boston Foundation, Google, HISTORY ®, and Jacqueline B. Mars. Additional support provided by the Bernstein Family Foundation and the Hearst Foundations.

https://www.archives.gov/news/articles/the-national-archives-celebrates-the-19th-amendment-1

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Response to George II (Reply #7)

Sun May 19, 2019, 08:33 PM

8. Thanks for sharing this.

I'll be in DC this summer and I didn't know about the exhibit.

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Response to lapucelle (Original post)

Sun May 19, 2019, 08:52 PM

9. Kick

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Response to lapucelle (Original post)

Sun May 19, 2019, 09:09 PM

11. 100 years is a big deal. nt

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Response to Lucky Luciano (Reply #11)

Mon May 20, 2019, 07:41 PM

17. It is a big deal.

The hardest thing to believe, however, is that it took so long.

I was in college when the ERA failed.

Section 1: Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.

Section 2: The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

Section 3: This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification.


And we could not get that passed.

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Response to lapucelle (Original post)

Mon May 20, 2019, 12:07 AM

13. Mahalo for this

Suffragist Appreciation Thread, lapucelle! Beautiful Peaceful Colors~

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Response to lapucelle (Original post)

Mon May 20, 2019, 07:02 AM

14. That is fantastic! (nt)

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Response to ehrnst (Reply #14)

Mon May 20, 2019, 07:38 PM

16. Wear you colors proudly tomorrow and again on June 4.

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