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Mon Jun 10, 2019, 09:56 AM

Death of the Country Club

City Journal

The country club, once a mainstay of American suburbia, faces a cloudy future, with a changing culture eroding its societal influence. Golf and tennis, the traditional club pastimes, have lost popularity. Declining marriage and fertility rates mean fewer families joining. Young professionals, many burdened with limited incomes and high debt, balk at paying dues. And a yearning for broader community makes the clubhouse’s exclusivity unappealing. The country club is increasingly a refuge for retirees—and, upon closure, a site for mixed-use development.

Country clubs once served as communal centers for social climbers. Dating to the 1880s, the clubs—modeled on the British aristocracy’s country houses—opened in the bucolic outskirts of industrial cities and towns. For a growing upper-middle-class, wealth permitted entry into this local society. Golf, dormant since the colonial era, became the favored sport for club members; in 1895 alone, more than 100 courses opened. Country clubs would help shape the development of streetcar suburbs, with stately homes lining manicured courses. By the Great Depression, nearly 4,500 country clubs existed across the country.

Throughout the twentieth century, the club’s influence was reflected by its prominent place in American literature. “In Zenith it was as necessary for a Successful Man to belong to a country club as it was to wear a linen collar,” wrote Sinclair Lewis in his 1922 novel, Babbitt. A decade later, in Appointment in Samarra, John O’Hara documented how a set of missteps at a country club could destroy a man’s social standing. In the 1950s, John Cheever’s short stories revealed the centrality of club life to upper-middle-class suburban America. Philip Roth’s first book, Goodbye, Columbus, sets a New Jersey country club as the stage for exploring class divisions in a youthful romance. John Updike’s 1981 Rabbit is Rich offered the country club as a paradise of relaxed indulgence; by 1990, in Rabbit at Rest, the poolside and fairways of the club are shadowed by mortality.

By the early 1960s, shortly after Roth’s fiction debut, the U.S. had 3,330 clubs, with 1.7 million members—fewer than during the Roaring Twenties, but membership now extended beyond “old money.” The typical postwar suburb featured several country clubs, divided by ethnicity and class, where young professionals and successful businessmen enjoyed status, exclusivity, and recreation. The prosperous Reagan years yielded even more clubs—and baby boomer members—though concerns started to emerge about changing lifestyles, age-old restrictions, and exorbitant fees. Country clubs responded with family-oriented attractions and cheaper “junior memberships” for younger people. More than 5,000 clubs operated during the 1990s, and thanks to Tiger Woods’s ascendance, the golf market enjoyed a 20-year period of growth.

The Great Recession changed the club’s fortunes. As the Wall Street Journal recently reported, Americans born between 1981 and 1996 are financially outmatched by every generation since the Depression. Despite higher levels of education, millennials have “less wealth, less property, lower marriage rates, and fewer children.” Annual country club dues, which run in the thousands of dollars, put membership beyond practical reach for many. Leisure for today’s younger adults more often involves streaming TV shows in a high-rent city bedroom, not playing 18 holes on a suburban green.

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Arrow 66 replies Author Time Post
Reply Death of the Country Club (Original post)
brooklynite Jun 2019 OP
Happyhippychick Jun 2019 #1
Blue_true Jun 2019 #63
Coventina Jun 2019 #2
marble falls Jun 2019 #3
susanna Jun 2019 #66
lpbk2713 Jun 2019 #4
Tommy_Carcetti Jun 2019 #5
Submariner Jun 2019 #6
TheBlackAdder Jun 2019 #13
SCantiGOP Jun 2019 #26
Blue_true Jun 2019 #64
SCantiGOP Jun 2019 #65
trev Jun 2019 #29
ooky Jun 2019 #7
kairos12 Jun 2019 #8
underpants Jun 2019 #27
trev Jun 2019 #33
genxlib Jun 2019 #9
rurallib Jun 2019 #10
B Stieg Jun 2019 #18
trev Jun 2019 #34
B Stieg Jun 2019 #47
trev Jun 2019 #48
The Velveteen Ocelot Jun 2019 #43
Scurrilous Jun 2019 #50
Bengus81 Jun 2019 #22
Historic NY Jun 2019 #11
KG Jun 2019 #12
Brainstormy Jun 2019 #14
keithbvadu2 Jun 2019 #15
LisaM Jun 2019 #16
brooklynite Jun 2019 #19
B Stieg Jun 2019 #17
llmart Jun 2019 #20
Submariner Jun 2019 #42
Ferrets are Cool Jun 2019 #21
moonseller66 Jun 2019 #23
trev Jun 2019 #36
Always Randy Jun 2019 #24
Initech Jun 2019 #25
underpants Jun 2019 #28
PJMcK Jun 2019 #54
Still In Wisconsin Jun 2019 #30
Kurt V. Jun 2019 #31
trev Jun 2019 #37
Kurt V. Jun 2019 #56
trev Jun 2019 #57
Kurt V. Jun 2019 #58
lark Jun 2019 #32
trev Jun 2019 #35
panader0 Jun 2019 #38
NRaleighLiberal Jun 2019 #39
rufus dog Jun 2019 #40
mr_lebowski Jun 2019 #41
MicaelS Jun 2019 #44
PJMcK Jun 2019 #55
Ligyron Jun 2019 #60
DFW Jun 2019 #45
Hoyt Jun 2019 #46
customerserviceguy Jun 2019 #49
TlalocW Jun 2019 #51
redstatebluegirl Jun 2019 #52
no_hypocrisy Jun 2019 #53
PJMcK Jun 2019 #59
JI7 Jun 2019 #61
UniteFightBack Jun 2019 #62

Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:10 AM

1. Good riddance

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Response to Happyhippychick (Reply #1)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 09:00 PM

63. I agree. They set society back by at least 100 years. nt

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:12 AM

2. Long overdue. Ugh!

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:12 AM

3. They're dying because members don't want to pay for what they want. Republicans most of them.

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Response to marble falls (Reply #3)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:55 AM

66. This right here.

I used to be a cook at one. This is exactly what is going on; members don't really want to pay as much anymore.

I didn't last long, to be fair. I never really liked the excess, especially the food. I did learn some advanced garde manger skills, though, so it was worth that at least!

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:34 AM

4. I caddied at a CC when I was very young. It was an eye opener.



That was where I first learned there were people different from me.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:34 AM

5. Yeah, this isn't something like video stores I'm going to get all nostalgic about.

Some things are fine dying away.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:38 AM

6. Bryant Gumbel on Real Sports interviewed a golf country club expert

who said a lot of golfers are leaving the sport because it is difficult to get the ball into that little cup on the green, so the GPA is considering installing larger cups to bring back golfers. I've never played golf, but this big cup thing seems almost funny.

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Response to Submariner (Reply #6)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:22 AM

13. I think it's been the same size since I was a kid, back in the 60s.

.

Man, everyone wants to shoot a 70.

.

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Response to Submariner (Reply #6)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:13 PM

26. Willie Nelson already did that

Last edited Mon Jun 10, 2019, 09:09 PM - Edit history (1)

20 years or so ago he built a 9 hole course on his property. The cups were twice the regulation size, and he had rules like, if you hit a tree, throw the ball where it should have gone since god made trees and he wouldn’t want any to mess up your game. He also had Par 5 holes that were 200 yards long (they should be 500 years) so everyone could shoot in the 70s.

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Response to SCantiGOP (Reply #26)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 09:03 PM

64. And if Texas had allowed, he would have put in a toking bar at the fifth hole turn. nt

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Response to Blue_true (Reply #64)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 09:09 PM

65. I imagine the toking bar

Traveled with Willie in the cart.

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Response to Submariner (Reply #6)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:21 PM

29. Why don't they just take up mini-golf?

Isn't that an easier course?

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:50 AM

7. Good. I wonder though, where all the

assholes will go now? 🤔

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:50 AM

8. Rodney Dangerfield wrecking Judge Smails and Bushwood Country Club

was a thing to behold. It was foretelling.

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Response to kairos12 (Reply #8)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:16 PM

27. I think this place is restricted Wang, don't tell em your Jewish

Rodney was really only supposed to have a bit part.

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Response to underpants (Reply #27)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:25 PM

33. Yes, he was.

He once said that movie literally made his career.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 10:58 AM

9. I think it is more fundamental than that

In a world of climate change, we will begin to see water and land use differently. Golf will die because it is not environmentally sustainable in most places.

Fifty years from now, historians and environmentalists will marvel at how we used to waste so much water and land to entertain a few people.

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Response to genxlib (Reply #9)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:09 AM

10. excellent point!

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Response to genxlib (Reply #9)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:35 AM

18. What about the argument that golf courses...

are curated, protected green spaces, something we're running out of?

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Response to B Stieg (Reply #18)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:27 PM

34. Open them for free public consumption

such as walking paths, and I'll agree.

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Response to trev (Reply #34)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 01:26 PM

47. You've never heard of Municipal Golf Courses?

Or the fact that you can walk them or, at some, even play Frisbee golf.

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Response to B Stieg (Reply #47)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 01:32 PM

48. Actually, no, because I don't follow golf.

But I thought the thread was about private country clubs....

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Response to B Stieg (Reply #18)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:43 PM

43. They could be turned into parks.

Golf courses use a ridiculous amount of water and herbicides just to have nice grass. Let the land revert back to nature as much as possible.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #43)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 02:36 PM

50. The town I live in is turning a smaller par 3 course into a park.

Miami Lakes, FL - Thanks to your support, the Town’s submission for the Miami Lakes Par 3 Central Park was selected as a finalist for the Miami Foundation’s 2016 Public Space Challenge. One of 56 selected finalists from a pool of more than 400 ideas that were submitted, the Town seeks to transform the Par 3 Golf Course, located on the east side of the Palmetto Expressway and south of NW 154th Street, into Miami Lakes Par 3 Central Park.

The 32-acre parcel of land, known as the Par 3 Golf Course, was acquired by the Town through a donation from The Graham Companies. Originally opened in 1963, the 18-hole Par 3 Course is located within prime gathering space of Don Shula’s Resort. Our vision is to convert the Par 3 Course into a multi-use central park. Proposed amenities and activities for people to enjoy include walking trails, fitness stations, kids play area, as well as botanical and butterfly gardens.

Strong evidence shows when people have access to parks and contact with the natural world, their physical and psychological health is improved. The availability of parks is an important quality-of-life factor, and the Town intends to continue looking for additional park and recreation opportunities for its residents.

https://www.miamilakes-fl.gov/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=875:par-3-central-park-selected-as-finalist-for-miami-foundation-s-public-space-challenge&catid=8&Itemid=289

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Response to genxlib (Reply #9)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:49 AM

22. I remember here in 1990 when we were having a huge drought and 100+ degree high temps.......

So the City put everyone on a watering schedule of three days per week max. Well...except for any and all Golf courses,they could water 7 days per week 24hrs per day if they wanted.

You really can't expect the RICH to go golf on browned out fairways and greens now can you.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:11 AM

11. Near me they are opening up their restaurants...

for catering outside events and even dinner. Members at the club are expect to frequent them. I see dues are being discounted 20% for 2 yrs.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:17 AM

12. thoughts and prayers.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:22 AM

14. sniff, sniff. n/t

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:28 AM

15. Being owned by a crooked president (emoluments) can be quite beneficial to the club.

Being owned by a crooked president (emoluments) can be quite beneficial to the club.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:29 AM

16. I have mixed feelings about this. In our small town, the country club was not elitist at all.

Anyone who wanted could pretty much belong, with a recommendation from another member (and membership was not exclusive). While we ourselves did not belong, we could accompany our friends whose families did, and use the pool (ditto for people who wanted to golf). For a long time our town didn't have a public pool (and now there is only one at the high school), so it was the only opportunity for lots of kids to swim in the summer. The golf course (which is still there) was a nice green space that was protected from sprawling development that eventually occurred all around it. We had our senior class party there.

I understand many of the arguments put forth above, but I hope we're not at the point where predatory development swoops in and gobbles up all these spaces, because that is definitely part of this picture. Those companies (many from out of the country) want that land.

I'd prefer to see them remain to the extent that they can, but drop the exclusivity.

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Response to LisaM (Reply #16)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:36 AM

19. Well, they're not likely to abandon the land and let it turn into pristine forest...

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:31 AM

17. 50 years ago, my family was "shunted" to the less prestigious of two winter clubs in the area...

because even though my dad was a doctor, he was also an Italian immigrant...
(winter clubs are country clubs that also have their own skating rinks, in NY at least)

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:39 AM

20. Country clubs were used to insure only a certain kind of person would be there.

You know - can't have the white, male elitists rubbing elbows with the likes of women or those "others".

Glad this is disappearing.

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Response to llmart (Reply #20)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:42 PM

42. You are so very spot on...I inadvertently put myself in an awkward position

In 1960 as a high school freshman, I naively tried to get a caddy job at the local swanky Winchester country club. Everyone heard the tips were great.

After so much frustration getting passed over for the job, I was pulled aside and informed that those caddy jobs were for the rich WASP kids with dad's who were physicians and lawyers, and that as a son of a truck driver living in the blue collar city of Somerville (pronounced by the WASPs as Slummerville) I was just embarrassing myself for even trying. Learned an important life lesson that summer.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:49 AM

21. They would already be withered away to almost nothing IF

T. Woods hadn't come along and reinvigorated the sport in 2000. I will never understand the adulation and hero worship for this wife-cheating, Agent Orange loving multi-millionaire.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 11:52 AM

23. Carlin on Golf

His suggestion or Golf Courses (Country Clubs) starts around 2:35

[link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=19&v=AbSRCjG-VLk|

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Response to moonseller66 (Reply #23)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:34 PM

36. And Robin Williams.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:12 PM

24. Lake Okeechobee Florida seems to be one of the victims

the air quality in the canals prevented me from going to Florida for winter camping at the Army Corp of Engineers campgrounds. Some needed to wear respirators ---but I decided if that is how I have to spend my vacation in Florida I'll go to Mexico instead. I went to Oaxaca and it was a pretty good replacement. Commercial fishermen have lost their businesses from the toxicity causing fishkill not only from red tide but also from runoff from Okeechobee----looking like guacamole. I am a self-employed real estate professional that has dodged the Country Club bullet ---no golf for me----even though I can play pretty well from my days as a caddy in high school.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:12 PM

25. Golf is an expensive hobby.

There's tee times, course fees, the equipment (and golf equipment gets RIDICULOUSLY fucking expensive), the golf carts, golf balls and so on and so on. With our money all going to the upper 1% how are we supposed to have hobbies?

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Response to Initech (Reply #25)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:20 PM

28. Not if you're good at it

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Response to Initech (Reply #25)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 03:00 PM

54. It doesn't have to be expensive

You can buy a good set of golf clubs second-hand for a few hundred dollars. Golf balls can be bought for $15 a dozen. You don't need to rent the motor cart, in fact, the walk is wonderful exercise. The clothing can be bought at discount department stores.

The greens fees for a public course (on NY's Long Island, for example) can cost from $24 and up. At Bethpage State Park, there are five courses, three of which cost $38 to play. If a round of golf takes 4-5 hours, that's about $8-$10 per hour of entertainment and sport. Many people pay far more than that to go watch professional sporting events. Isn't better to be doing something than watching someone else do it?

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:22 PM

30. Speaking as a former caddy at a snooty country club, GOOD RIDDANCE!

Although I will admit I do enjoy playing golf. I'm not any good at it though. Just a public links golfer here.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:23 PM

31. Interesting. also, i never did get into roth or updike. one novel apiece was enough.

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Response to Kurt V. (Reply #31)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:36 PM

37. I'm sorry to hear that.

Those are two of my favorite authors.

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Response to trev (Reply #37)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 03:12 PM

56. i only read american pastoral and rabbit, run. any suggestions?

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Response to Kurt V. (Reply #56)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 04:27 PM

57. For Roth,

I highly recommend Deception--a very quirky, unusually told story--or any of the Zuckerman books.

For Updike, I'm a big fan of his short stories. Also, the complete Rabbit trilogy (Rabbit, Redux and Rabbit Is Rich) continue the first book in good stead.

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Response to trev (Reply #57)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 05:19 PM

58. Thanks

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:24 PM

32. Most clubs were definitely for the well off, but that did change here for awhile.

3 houses down from me was a Swim & Tennis Club. You could be a member for $500/yr or swim or play tennis for $1/game for tennis. Thnk swimming was $1 for 4 hours or $3 for the day. They had a good swim team and the cost of that was $100/year which included competitions! It was great - we went swimming there often and the kids and their dad played tennis. My daughter was on the swim team and it kept her busy all summer. It was great. But one of the Treasurers stole a lot of $$ and the club closed & the swim team along with it. The kids & parents in our area lost a lot when that happened. So sad. It was a true community treasure from 1985 - 2005.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:31 PM

35. My soil science professor back in 1976

worked as a part-time golf course consultant. He told us of one new project in which they had to remove the entire first six feet of soil and replace it with quasi-artificial substances. I immediately changed my major.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:37 PM

38. Here in Arizona, golf courses in places like Phoenix

and Tucson are a serious drain on the water supply.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:39 PM

39. Yay. Way passe. Former caddy here...a parade of real assholes

Was my experience. I learned to despise the wealthy doing that.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:40 PM

40. Seeing something interesting here in the OC

We play Saturday mornings at about 7:00 AM on public courses. City courses cost $65 to $75, but hard to get on and about 5 hour rounds. So we step up to the next level and try to pay about $90 which gets us a 4 hour round.

This year we needed to scramble a bit more, pre pay for five or ten rounds. Otherwise the same courses were about $150.

Here is the thing, we used to always have groups in front of us, courses booked solid in the morning. Past couple months there are gaps. Which means they have even more gaps later in the day. Prices haven’t budged yet though.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:41 PM

41. Only one Country Club much matters to me, that's the one in Orinda, CA ...

I tell ya man, the land it sits on (with an 18 hole course) has got to be worth something on the order of $1B, maybe more. It sprawls throughout the area I grew up in (well, 4-7th grade) and it's absolutely BEAUTIFUL.

We were nowhere near wealthy enough to belong but I had friends who did and I've been there as a guest to swim and play tennis. It's a freaking iconic place, I'd be bummed if ever closed down and got turned in to mansions.

All the OTHER ones in the world ... F-em!

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:43 PM

44. I hate golf courses.

IMO, they're the biggest waste of land there is.

To quote Rodney Dangerfield: "I'll buy your crummy snobatorium and build condos on it."

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Response to MicaelS (Reply #44)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 03:07 PM

55. Your opinion is noted

Country clubs are private businesses who own their land. They can do anything they want with it.

Public courses provide employment and recreation. The community decides what to do with the land.

Your quote was spoken by Mr. Dangerfield's character, Al Czverik, but written by Harold Ramis, Douglas Kenney and Brian Doyle-Murray.

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Response to PJMcK (Reply #55)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 07:11 PM

60. Ah, Doug Kenny.

Now there's a blast from the past. In high school and particularly college, The National Lampoon was our laugh track.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 12:59 PM

45. I've been to a couple of those things

As an invited guest of my parents, who were themselves invited guests of someone else.

I vaguely remember decent Sunday brunches and a lot of boredom. I have never played golf, so I sure as hell never played golf at age 12, or whenever that was. Country Clubs could all disappear from the face of the earth, and I'd never notice. I'll bet I'm not the only one on DU to be able to make that statement, either.

As for the WSJ's comment, it's just a generalization, as usual. My two girls were born in 1983 and 1985. The one born in 1983 makes out OK, but lives in Manhattan where taxes and cost of living are exorbitant. Even if she COULD afford a country club membership, she would have neither the time nor the inclination to hang with the sort of people who belong to those things. My younger daughter now lives near Frankfurt, and makes a huge amount of money (not a million a year yet, but more than half that), and even after half going to German taxes, she's more than comfortable. But with her baby daughter and her full-time (more like double time) job, the last thing she would want to do is join one of those things (I don't even know of they have them here in Germany). She and her boyfriend were invited to the baptism of the baby of a friend of theirs in London this past weekend, and didn't have a baby sitter for their 1 year old daughter, so they invited my wife and me to come up to London for Saturday night to babysit (!!!). We said, ummm, sure, and before we could ask about travel arrangements, we got the emails with our plane tickets and hotel arrangements. A little extravagant for a night of babysitting, if you ask me, but it was probably worth more to them than some membership in a country club neither of them would ever have the time for anyway. Between the two of them, they will surpass us in wealth (if the one hasn't already--we never ask) and property (done deal), and probably at least equal us in marriage and children. So much for the Wall Street Journal and its generalizations.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 01:05 PM

46. I feel about country clubs much the same as fraternities and sororities. Screw em.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 01:46 PM

49. I can tell you for sure

that golf and tennis have not lost popularity in my part of SC, in the Myrtle Beach area. I don't engage in either sport, but my two best friends down there are a golfer and a tennis player, and they each think that they're a bit better than the other guy! My golfer friend is retired, but he took a job working part time at a local golf course, not for the money, but to be able to play for free on his off days.

I think that country clubs are declining because the land they have in the most developed suburbs is just simply too valuable to let people hit balls on vast tracts all day for what must be minimal money compared to what the owners of the club can get by selling the land to developers.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 02:39 PM

51. A distrubing trend

Without country clubs, an important institution will be gone that lends cultural understanding when viewing classical works such as, "Caddyshack."

TlalocW

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 02:41 PM

52. Now if the sorority and fraternity system can just go with it.

All of these are used to marginalize people while elevating the "elite class". They are all sophomoric and useless.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 02:51 PM

53. My father (born in 1923) grew up believing you really arrived when you joined a country club.

I watched him eagerly join our town's country club. It had a clubhouse and a 9-hole golf course.

But it wasn't enough. He waited until the Tuxedo Country Club, arguably the most exclusive club for a while, accepted Jews. Dad practically ran to the front of the line to join. He enjoyed mingling with rich WASP's. He morphed into them by becoming familiar with British authors and upper caste British society. Learned how to play court tennis. Visited exclusive gentlemen's clubs in England. Played golf at St. Andrews.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 05:27 PM

59. Trump's golf handicap

This is from Rick Reilly's new book, "Commander-In-Cheat."

So the caddies and the pros who make a living in the game estimate his handicap to be somewhere between a 7 and a 10. The only problem with all tha is Trump insists his handicap is 2.8. In the world of golf handicaps, that difference is huge. If Trump is a 2.8, Queen Elizabeth is a pole vaulter. No possible way. It would take a 9 handicap five good years of hard practice to get to a 2.8 and Donald Trumps doesn't practice.


I'm only a few chapters into the book but so far, it's excellent.

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 07:13 PM

61. good riddance

 

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Response to brooklynite (Original post)

Mon Jun 10, 2019, 07:28 PM

62. A lot of them are pimping out their places to weddings. nt

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