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Fri Oct 11, 2019, 10:44 AM

"Fake News" can be a game, and it teaches us to become more discerning

One my my daily tech reads gave us this interesting article about gamifying memes and the trolling of social media. It states that after only playing such games for 15 minutes, the participants become more resilient to the BS that Russia's troll farms are spewing at us daily.


Half of the battle against disinformation campaigns is educating people about how they work. And that's why the Finnish public broadcasting company Yle—Finland's equivalent of the BBC—has created a game called Troll Factory. The game, which recently won the European Journalism Centre and Google News Initiative's Global Youth and News Media Prize for promoting media literacy, puts the player in the role of a disinformation operative working for an Internet Research Agency-like organization with an anti-immigrant agenda.

The gamification of education on disinformation campaigns has been shown to help build up a resistance to fake news in the past. The University of Cambridge conducted a study in 2018 using a browser game called "Bad News" and found that completing the 15-minute game increased "psychological resistance" to fake news on social media, reducing the perceived credibility of fake news headlines by an average of 21 percent across 15,000 participants.

Troll Factory takes Bad News' approach a step further by using real samples of memes, conspiracy theories, and fake news articles used in such campaigns that infect social media and heighten the polarization of public discourse around the world—and in the US and Western Europe in particular. With the increasing reliance on social media for news, Yle's interactive team sought to create more awareness of how weaponized social media has become and more understanding among social media users of how they could be drawn into unintentionally spreading false information.
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The result can be somewhat eye-opening for those who haven't tracked disinformation campaigns. "People have described Troll Factory experience to be 'scary awful' but informative and enlightening," Koponen said, "something that's needed in order to illustrate the reality, motives, intentions and potential effects, of different forms of information operations."

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Reply "Fake News" can be a game, and it teaches us to become more discerning (Original post)
RainCaster Oct 11 OP
Newest Reality Oct 11 #1
SWBTATTReg Oct 11 #2

Response to RainCaster (Original post)

Fri Oct 11, 2019, 10:59 AM

1. K&R-R-R

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Response to RainCaster (Original post)

Fri Oct 11, 2019, 11:52 AM

2. And this 'fake news' can and does backfire...when they (original 'fake news' people) try...

to push the envelope on something, it doesn't go anywhere. This admin. is so corrupt that no one believes anything they say anymore.

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