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Sun Jan 15, 2012, 01:07 AM

"Estimates place the number of torture survivors living in the U.S. at 500,000".

beneath the blindfold
http://www.beneaththeblindfold.org/Home.html

Co-directed by Chicago-based filmmakers Kathy Berger and Ines Sommer, Beneath the Blindfold interweaves the personal stories of four torture survivors who now reside in the U.S., but originally hail from different parts of the globe: South and Central America, Africa, and the U.S.

While Beneath the Blindfold addresses torture as a global human rights issue, the film does not shy away from touching on both the historical and the more recent U.S. involvement in torture and the question that this raises: why were we so willing to accept the use of torture in our name?

Despite the media coverage of abuse at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo Bay, the voices of torture survivors have rarely been fully heard in the ensuing public discussion about the use of torture. Without their stories, torture remains abstract, a practice that happens to people we neither know nor care about. They become statistics, their human suffering easily ignored.





Film explores victims’ view of torture
http://newssun.suntimes.com/entertainment/9908760-421/film-explores-victims-view-of-torture.html

Q: What is you ultimate goal for this film? What do you hope it will accomplish?

A: My greatest hope for this film is that it will raise awareness. Four years ago there was a Pew research poll that said 43 percent of Americans condone torture. I just hope we can reach people and help them understand that torture is actually not an effective way to get information, that it has been discredited by interrogators, and that it is a terrible violation of human rights. If we can make any sort of a dent in that percentage, that would be wonderful.




Accused War Criminals Make Home in U.S.
http://abcnews.go.com/2020/Law/samantar-monster-door/story?id=9867614

Like citizens of other countries ravaged by brutal regimes, many refugees who survived Barre's rule came to America to start over and live quietly among the population.

But shockingly, along with refugees and victims of war crimes, some alleged war criminals themselves have emigrated to the United States, escaping retribution for the monstrous acts they may have committed at home.

Men accused of human rights abuses from Somalia to Venezuela have laid their own claims to the American dream and now enjoy the same freedoms they're accused of trying to take away from their own people. It may seem impossible, but one of these men -- some allegedly responsible for mass murder, torture and the destruction of entire populations -- might literally be living next door.









In case anyone wants to see the film.



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Reply "Estimates place the number of torture survivors living in the U.S. at 500,000". (Original post)
Solly Mack Jan 2012 OP
sabrina 1 Jan 2012 #1
Solly Mack Jan 2012 #2
annabanana Jan 2012 #3
Solly Mack Jan 2012 #5
Cerridwen Jan 2012 #4
Solly Mack Jan 2012 #6
Cerridwen Jan 2012 #7
Cerridwen Jan 2012 #8
Solly Mack Jan 2012 #9
Cerridwen Jan 2012 #11
sad sally Jan 2012 #10
Solly Mack Jan 2012 #12
Cerridwen Jan 2012 #13
Fumesucker Jan 2012 #14

Response to Solly Mack (Original post)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 02:32 AM

1. This is probably one of the main issues that got me so involved in politics, when the Bush

War Criminals opened Guantanamo Bay and we saw the first pictures of the planes with those detainees in orange suits and chains. It was sickening and I had a bad feeling that was only the beginning of their nightmare journey. As it turned out it was.

Dick Cheney is an evil man. But until this country comes to terms with the fact that they either start prosecuting war criminals, or the stature of this country, already diminished by what has been done already, will continue to diminish.

To think we could have influenced the whole world to make this world a better place. We had the power. Instead, the country took a turn towards the darkest side and refuses to make amends even to those who wrongfully detained and tortured.

I am glad people are not keeping quiet about this most horrible, evil practice that should belong to the dark ages, but we, the supposed 'shining city on the hill' have made acceptable.

If this country prosecuted its war criminals, the polls would be very different.

Thanks for the link Solly Mack.

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #1)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 04:09 PM

2. You're welcome, sabrina

Sorry to say, but I doubt the film will change many hearts.

People have to try though.

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Response to Solly Mack (Original post)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 04:16 PM

3. . . .and the wound festers. . . n/t

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Response to annabanana (Reply #3)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 04:49 PM

5. I hope the victims find peace

I don't hope that for any of the guilty or the enablers.

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Response to Solly Mack (Original post)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 04:19 PM

4. I'll K & R, Solly.

I don't think I'd be able to watch the film; it would make me too angry.

So a K and an R it is.

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Response to Cerridwen (Reply #4)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 05:01 PM

6. Hi, Cerridwen

It would be hard to watch and I will get angry as well.

Well, more angry..'cause I don't think I've stopped being angry (yet) over what my government has done. (if I ever do)

Still... I'm going to try and get a copy of the video. I won't be able to attend the re-screening.

The film highlights several survivors. Sadly, some are from countries the US was involved with (School of Americas trained, Chile etc..) in one way or another.

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Response to Solly Mack (Reply #6)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 05:04 PM

7. Precisely; *more* angry.

I'm still getting over what happened with my mom; enough rage there that if it could be used for energy purposes I think it might light up the entire Las Vegas valley.

Again, I'll kick as I can and share the information with whomever I can.

Thank you, Solly for bringing this to our attention.

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Response to Solly Mack (Reply #6)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 05:35 PM

8. Another kick and an explanation.

Hi again, Solly.

I realized my last reply to you may have been disjointed and/or vague.

What I mean is that anger is ruining my health; it causes no end of 'gut' problems for me. Though I can't completely avoid the feeling, I don't go looking for more reasons to get angry. Well, other than reading DU.

I'll keep a reference to this post and a bookmark about the film so I can check in on it when things 'calm down' a bit here on my personal home front.


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Response to Cerridwen (Reply #8)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 06:23 PM

9. (((Cerridwen)))

I can relate to how physically ill emotions can make a person...especially anger.

I hope things do calm down soon for you. Good thoughts coming your way.



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Response to Solly Mack (Reply #9)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 06:56 PM

11. You just gave me the biggest

smile on my face I've had in days.



Thank you!

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Response to Solly Mack (Original post)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 06:34 PM

10. If 43% of Americans believe in torture as an acceptable means to gain information -

and I don't doubt the number (43%, in fact it may be higher than this) - it creates an image of the United States of America as being nothing more than a nation of torture.

To foster the idea that by torturing a human by another human, to render the tortured person as totally defenseless and willing to say or do anything to stop pain being inflicted, is perverted.

The belief that a terrorist leader, one bent on the destruction of other human lives, can be tortured to the point of giving up their terrorist plots, turns those torturing to gain this knowledge into terrorists themselves. A vicious cycle with results that dehumanize a civil society.

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Response to sad sally (Reply #10)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 08:02 PM

12. Yes. To everything you said.

I'll just had: The lack of accountability (prosecutions) serves only to cement the image of America as a nation that tortures ...and then protects the guilty.

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Response to Solly Mack (Original post)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 10:56 PM

13. Kicking. n/t

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Response to Solly Mack (Original post)

Sun Jan 15, 2012, 11:08 PM

14. Prosecuting torturers was almost universally popular on DU at one time..

Not so much any more though...

I wonder what changed?

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