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Mon Mar 18, 2013, 07:15 PM

Fire and Ice

“Fear is the primary motivator of sheep or slaves, or at least those slaves who have never attempted to regain their freedom. If, because of fear, we go against what we feel deep down to be real, right, good, and true, then we go against ourselves.”
-- Dr. Rubin “Hurricane” Carter; Eye of the Hurricane; page 6.


Fear saturates our society. I have encountered it in talking to activists, union members, social workers, boxers, and a wide range of other folks that I’ve talked to in recent weeks. I see it on the television and in newspapers. More, fear mutates and becomes hatred, which politicians peddle like snake oil salesmen.

Buddha said, “Do not be afraid.” In the gospel of Matthew -- which contains some 15 Buddha-like sayings -- one reads the prophet Jesus saying, “Do not worry” (6:25) and twice saying, “Do not be afraid” (14:27 & 17). In more modern times, prophets including Gandhi, King, and Malcolm X spoke about the damage that fear does to individuals and society.

Yet people, even “great” individuals, feel fear from time to time. Indeed, the human brain evolved in a manner that made fear a function for survival. That same structure that created the general wariness which helped our ancestors survive on the savannahs in Africa still exists; however, the anxiety and fear from former times often limit’s the quality of life for modern mankind. There is a difference between fear of poison snakes in, say, the Amazon jungles, than in Atlanta apartment buildings.

There is also a difference between the poison snakes that crawl on the ground, and those that inhabit Fox News and the Republican Party. But, before going there, I’d like to focus on an issue relating to early childhood development that is important. At least I think it is.

Parents have the opportunity, and obligation, to teach youngsters four building-blocks that will help them deal with those challenges and stumbling blocks that people encounter when they enter the larger society. These are, in order, that the child is: (1) loveable; (2) worthwhile; (3) capable; and (4) responsible. Thus, the parent(s) communicate that: I love you; you are worth my time, and I enjoy spending time with you; you can accomplish what you set your mind to; and I trust you to think for yourself.

Even with a firm foundation made of these four building blocks, the larger society can be difficult to navigate. For our culture has purposely lied to people for many years. It has taught far, far too many people that they are not loveable or worthwhile, for example, because of the color of their skin, their weight, their sexual identity, and many other factors. More, it has defined the female as less capable and responsible than the male. And while it is certainly true that our society has made progress in many of these areas, the fact remains that American culture does not provide a level playing field.

The very concept that a clown like George W. Bush could be considered for president, much less be installed by the US Supreme Court despite losing the 2000 election, would be considered a joke in a healthy society. Yet, not only was he installed into that office, but he used fear and hatred to shred the Constitution, and promote never-ending warfare abroad. And while I hesitate to say anything that could be mistaken as giving George W. Bush credit for anything, it is accurate to say that the forces he fronted for not only saturated American society with toxic fears and hatreds, they promoted the growth of destructive social inequalities and injustices that require each of us to overcome our fears and hatreds in order to prevent the utter destruction of this country.

There is no “leader” that can do this for us. There is no man or women who can do for us what we need to do for ourselves. No politician could do it, even if they wanted to. No Gandhi, King, or Malcolm to lead us to some promised land. For better or for worse, it’s up to us. You and me.

I’ve spoken a great deal about the sport of boxing on DU over the years. As a boxer, then a trainer/manager of amateur and professional fighters, I learned about fear. The great wizard of boxing, Cus D’Amato, used to say that everyone who gets into that ring knows fear. That’s true: you begin to experience it in the weeks and days before a bout, and you sure as heck feel it the day of a bout. It builds as you arrive at the arena, and grows while you prepare to enter the ring. And everyone from the amateur ranks to the sport’s greatest champions has to deal with that fear.

Cus compared fear to fuel. He often said that the coward is consumed by that fuel, while the hero transforms it into the fire required to win. In that sense, I can say -- only slightly tongue in cheek -- that all of human life imitates the Great Sport.

Obviously, there are differences. In boxing, one uses that fuel in order to not only exploit the weaknesses in the opponent’s style, but also to be able to turn their strengths against them. For that is the brutal reality of boxing: one seeks to inflict organ damage with body punches, and to render the opponent either unconscious, or otherwise unable to continue, with punches to his head. However, tempting as it may be at times, we should not take this approach in socio-political activism.

In order to institute meaningful change, we need to engage in individual and group campaigns of nonviolence, in the manner of Gandhi and King. This is the most effective way of creating avenues towards progress. It is also the most difficult, and requires the greatest strength.

When we read about Gandhi and King’s campaigns for social justice, we see that these exercises in nonviolence were transformational. On the surface, it is apparent that both Gandhi and King focused their nonviolence on the opposition, as well as the undecided people in the larger society. Equally important, but too frequently overlooked, it allowed for both men to have the patience needed to deal with the internal conflicts that so often threatened the movements they helped to lead.

Many of those who worked with Gandhi and King were often engaged in heated internal struggles. These were conflicts over tactics, and other issues. Under the stresses that social movements always face, even petty jealousies surface. These are known as “power struggles.” It was largely due to their commitment to nonviolence -- specifically the ability to have an open mind, admit to errors, and accept that others will have different views and even unattractive personal shortcomings -- that Gandhi and King are recognized as being the most powerful, influential member of their movements.

Such an approach is definitely needed in society today. Heck, I even think it might make this forum a more meaningful place to discuss social and political issues …..even the more emotionally volatile ones.

Peace,
H2O Man

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Arrow 48 replies Author Time Post
Reply Fire and Ice (Original post)
H2O Man Mar 2013 OP
freshwest Mar 2013 #1
H2O Man Mar 2013 #18
Solly Mack Mar 2013 #2
H2O Man Mar 2013 #19
KoKo Mar 2013 #3
H2O Man Mar 2013 #20
CrazyOrangeCat Mar 2013 #4
H2O Man Mar 2013 #22
CrazyOrangeCat Mar 2013 #27
Autumn Mar 2013 #5
H2O Man Mar 2013 #29
coeur_de_lion Mar 2013 #6
H2O Man Mar 2013 #30
coeur_de_lion Mar 2013 #36
H2O Man Mar 2013 #37
coeur_de_lion Mar 2013 #38
scarletwoman Mar 2013 #39
H2O Man Mar 2013 #48
bvar22 Mar 2013 #7
H2O Man Mar 2013 #31
WillyT Mar 2013 #8
H2O Man Mar 2013 #32
me b zola Mar 2013 #9
zeemike Mar 2013 #10
Me. Mar 2013 #11
Me. Mar 2013 #12
Phlem Mar 2013 #14
2naSalit Mar 2013 #13
panader0 Mar 2013 #15
loudsue Mar 2013 #16
SamReynolds Mar 2013 #17
snagglepuss Mar 2013 #21
sabrina 1 Mar 2013 #23
malaise Mar 2013 #24
Octafish Mar 2013 #25
malthaussen Mar 2013 #26
bigtree Mar 2013 #28
Uncle Joe Mar 2013 #33
LiberalAndProud Mar 2013 #34
libodem Mar 2013 #35
myrna minx Mar 2013 #40
chervilant Mar 2013 #41
Zorra Mar 2013 #42
Vestigial_Sister Mar 2013 #43
bhikkhu Mar 2013 #44
AndyTiedye Mar 2013 #45
H2O Man Mar 2013 #47
In_The_Wind Mar 2013 #46

Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 07:54 PM

1. Another excellent essay. And from experience, I say this. The fear for those or that which we love

and seek to protect is stronger than fear for self.

It draws upon an energy field for which I have no name, but it exists and transforms us into more than we ever dreamed we were capable of being. I am reminded with that sentence of a quote:

It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped. Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.

Day of Affirmation Address (June 6, 1966) by Robert F. Kennedy in Capetown, South Africa.

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Response to freshwest (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 10:53 AM

18. Very good!

That is one of RFK's most powerful speeches, and it is as true today as it was in 1966. Great principles hold constant.

Thank you!

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 07:57 PM

2. K&R

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Response to Solly Mack (Reply #2)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 10:53 AM

19. Thank you.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 08:02 PM

3. From Your Words...to the GREAT OZ...

what else can I say,but:

K&R...

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Response to KoKo (Reply #3)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 10:58 AM

20. Thanks!

I suppose that, in a sense, the DU community is part of that GREAT OZ !!!

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 08:05 PM

4. Kick

I was 9 when MLK and RFK were gunned down. My parents were bright, liberal-minded people, and I was aware of the horror through my own eyes and ears and from their reaction.

Your essay touches on perhaps my greatest, most stifling fear; they kill the peacemakers . . .

A hard thing to put from one's heart and mind.

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Response to CrazyOrangeCat (Reply #4)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 11:38 AM

22. Right.

James Douglass's 2012 book, "Gandhi and the Unspeakable: His Final Experiment with Truth," provides convincing evidence that the Mahatma's murder was another "shadow government" operation.

It's curious -- fear of the unknown was certainly a significant part of the creation of religion. And that carried through in acts of sacrifice. "God" demanded sacrifice, of course. Wouldn't be happy up there in heaven without ritual sacrifices.

Some cultures encouraged rituals with forms of self-sacrifice, such as fasting, the Sun Dance, etc. Others found it more convenient to sacrifice other living beings, such as goats and humans. By no coincidence, the first type overcomes fear, while the second intensifies it.

Even today, at the lowest levels of understanding, millions of Americans believe that the story of the gospels is that "God" demanded the sacrifice of a man who engaged in and encouraged the rituals of self-sacrifice, to end the need for sacrificing goats etc. Gracious. Talk about missing the point.

Both MLK and RFK were aware of the likely end of the path they were on. In a very real sense, they were willing to sacrifice their own lives, in order to channel that energy that they knew human society needed at that time. Obviously, "God" was not behind their murders; it was those who not only hated them as individuals, but feared what energy -- or, power -- they were creating among the masses.

Their deaths are one level of the "greater love has no man, than to lay down his own life for his friends." But there is another level to that, which is equally important: we can "lay down" the lives of relative comfort that we have, in order to channel that same energy force. We can use the examples of RFK and MLK, even though we know we aren't going to be as influential or powerful or famous as they were.

I suspect that by now, you can tell this is a topic -- or THE topic -- I enjoy talking about. Sorry for my rambling on and on.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #22)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 01:32 PM

27. I'm glad you elaborated.

Further perspective is definitely welcome. Take care.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 08:14 PM

5. K/R There is not a word I can add to this.

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Response to Autumn (Reply #5)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 04:19 PM

29. Thanks!

I am glad that you enjoyed it. And I appreciate the "K/R."

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 08:39 PM

6. H I think this may be among your top 5 essays -- maybe eve #1

Fear has dominated this country since 2000. It's like the elephant in the room that no one admits to. It isn't real, but folks on Fox have convinced millions that it is and that it's always waiting around the corner for us. And that Obama is the King of all the bad things that will happen to us all some day. Obama is trying to turn things around but look at his opposition! They have their own TV station to promote fear. Who would ever have thought such a thing was possible?

And then there are those among us H20 (you are such a one) -- who are like "light workers". People who consistently work every day to dissipate fear, to spread harmony, to do good things, to improve their surroundings and help people. To help the planet.

I'm proud to know you. I love that I can say I know someone who is unafraid to be an activist and a positive voice, a force for good in the world.

Recently, I've been tackling my own fear. Trying to stop that negative voice in my head who tells me I can't accomplish things. So a group of us are meeting once a month at my house to talk about positive thinking, in an attempt to retrain our brains to think differently -- positively. Law of Attraction and all that stuff.

So far so good.

I'm wanting to surround myself with positive healthy people and leave the negatives in my life behind. I'm happy to say that you have always been a positive influence brother, and I look forward to hearing more about the positive changes coming up in your life. You have wonderful things to look forward to.

You're a treasure. I hope I can always call you my brother and my friend. It's an honor.

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Response to coeur_de_lion (Reply #6)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 04:33 PM

30. Well, thank you!

What a nice message!

Though I've said it 101 times on DU, I suppose 102 can't hurt. Obama's 2008 election came in on a great wave of energy. Part of it was the national democratic political machine, but even that became a surf-board riding a huge grass roots wave.

However, once he was elected, far too many people believed the hard work was done. Victory was at hand. Now President Obama would change things. In one of the better books from his first term in office, a top aide admitted that the White House had not been focused on keeping that grass roots movement energized and active (some of my books are upstairs, and so I'm not providing the exact quote).

That wave of energy ceased. We could point fingers at the President, his staff, the grass roots, the media's post election focus on the Tea Party, or that our shoes were tied too tightly. Or we could learn from that error -- which created a vacuum that was soon filled by the fear and hatred of the rabid right. In my humble opinion, we should not waste time blaming anyone or everyone, and dedicate our energies toward recreating that energy.

Now, no matter if a person likes or dislikes President Obama .....if they believe he is potentially a transformational figure, or view him as a cog in the 1%'s machine .....the answer remains the same: what are each one of us doing?

And yes! While I would advise you to be far more careful in your future choices in these areas, you are stuck with me! Ha!

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #30)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 08:53 PM

36. Far more careful?

explain?

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Response to coeur_de_lion (Reply #36)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 09:17 PM

37. Well, that's easy:

with a friend & brother like myself .......

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #37)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 09:28 PM

38. I have no fear

Your combination of Indian and Irish blood makes you practically saint like. Stubbornly saint like LOL. And a good fighter if my honor ever needs defending.

Yep Daniel Day Lewis should definitely play you in the movie bro.

Remember the last of the Mohicans? Oh yeah . . . .

Isn't it cool to have a little sister who hero worships you so?

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #30)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 09:45 PM

39. "we should not waste time blaming anyone or everyone..."

Forgive me, but that brings to mind one of my favorite movie quotes - from a mostly absurd and forgettable movie, but the one line stuck with me, because I thought it was so pithy and sensible:

(spoken by Sean Connery's character) The Japanese have a saying, "Fix the problem, not the blame." Find out what's fucked up and fix it. Nobody gets blamed. We're always after who fucked up. Their way is better.


From the movie, "Rising Sun".

Beautiful essay, many thanks!
sw

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Response to scarletwoman (Reply #39)

Wed Mar 20, 2013, 07:14 PM

48. Thanks!

Goog quote. I remember the movie.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 08:44 PM

7. Fear is NOT optional.

It IS a feeling that is a necessary part of the Human Psyche.
Without FEAR, we would all be dead.

Maintaining a choice while experiencing FEAR is a valued trait,
and one that can be learned.

Fight or Flight is the normal primary response to FEAR.
Many times (but not always) there IS another option,
The Gandhi Option.
Some call that "choosing LOVE",
and is believed to be what separates us from the animals,
though there is now documentation that even some animals can exercise that choice too.

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Response to bvar22 (Reply #7)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 04:41 PM

31. True, that .....

...and well-said. Thank you.

"Fight or flight" is the biological response to, in most cases, an immediate threat. And, in some cases, be it from nature, nurture, or any combination thereof, an individual can be the victim of an overactive "F-o-F" manner of existence. And that is surely a form of saturation.

However, while that is absolutely related to the OP, it isn't the specific type of fear that I think is the problem in today's society.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 08:45 PM

8. K & R !!!

 


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Response to WillyT (Reply #8)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 04:41 PM

32. Thanks!

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 09:12 PM

9. Thank you for this post~

~and the quote from Rubin Carter was the cherry on the cake.

Be well H20 Man

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 09:21 PM

10. Yep...fear IS our greatest obstacle.

And it does no good to pretend you don't have it...

"In order to institute meaningful change, we need to engage in individual and group campaigns of nonviolence, in the manner of Gandhi and King."

I totally agree.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 09:45 PM

11. This Is A Most Welcome & True Post

I see a world paralyzed and a Congress held by a stranglehold of fear of the future...what might come the next day, week, election.And I think of the LGBT community who have persisted in claiming their rights, without the use of bombs, police dogs or water hoses and lo and behold they are winning the argument. How long? Not long ...now.

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Response to Me. (Reply #11)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 09:56 PM

12. Ps.

When GHB did his little whining last week about wanting to stand up for his son I wanted to puke.

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Response to Me. (Reply #12)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 10:20 PM

14. Really?

I wanted to hurl monkey poo at him.



-p

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 10:03 PM

13. Yes indeed.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Mar 18, 2013, 10:35 PM

15. I always enjoy finding an H2O Man post on DU

"However tempting as it may be at times, we should not take this approach in socio-political activism."
True, yet non-violence takes great courage as well, many times the protestors know that they're going to get a beating.
And so that fear is fuel too.
K and R

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 02:12 AM

16. Thank you, Waterman.

That hits home.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 02:26 AM

17. An excellent truth I've pondered many times...

 

And expressed far better than I could have myself.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 11:32 AM

21. k & r Bookmrkd

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 11:39 AM

23. Another great post H20 Man!

There is no “leader” that can do this for us. There is no man or women who can do for us what we need to do for ourselves. No politician could do it, even if they wanted to. No Gandhi, King, or Malcolm to lead us to some promised land. For better or for worse, it’s up to us. You and me.


And yet, the sad thing is that so many people, believing they do need someone to lead them, have been looking at the worst possible choices in this country for that 'leadership' whose main goal is to keep them living in fear.

And this:

The very concept that a clown like George W. Bush could be considered for president, much less be installed by the US Supreme Court despite losing the 2000 election, would be considered a joke in a healthy society.


We are a very young country, comparitively speaking. I hope we are simply going through some difficult times as every other country has done throughout history and that we will get 'better' because it is true that at this moment in time, we are not a healthy society.

K&R

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 11:43 AM

24. Great post Waterman

Rec

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 11:46 AM

25. Fear cuts through the miasma like smelling salts.

It is another weapon wielded by the authoritarians in the employ of the Owners to manipulate the mob.

What a famous fearmonger found:



"Terrorism is the best political weapon, for nothing drives people harder than a fear of sudden death." -- Adolf Hitler



Lots of interesting ties to our present day, that approach.

I very much appreciate you bringing up the role of Faith or Understanding or whatever it is that gives one the ability to proceed, even when confronting the "Unspeakable."

Thank you for your outstanding essay, H2O Man. You are fearless, as are those who know you and your work.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 01:24 PM

26. Remember the mantra from "Dune?"

“I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.”

There's a great scene in one of Terry Pratchett's books, where some teachers are appalled at one of their colleagues. Seems she had taught her children to face their fears. One little girl was afraid there were monsters in the basement. "Oh, dear, is she hiding under the bedclothes?" "No, she got her father's sword and went hunting them!"

I wonder if the turning of the media and our politicians to the paths of fear is a reflection of their increasing conservatism. Conservatives tend to fear more, that's why they try to conserve the present and deny change. And there is an interesting synchronicity to be found between the mass media pushing fear, and the mass media pushing mindless entertainment. By shrieking fear at every turn, they encourage us to turn away, to ignore the world and instead focus on something to numb our minds. Then they can keep on plundering us -- and incidentally conquer their own fear, which is of irrelevance.

Fear has been with our society for a long time, even back in the hazily-viewed days of the Revolution. There's a reason Hunter Thompson titled his two greatest books Fear and Loathing. Of course, loathing proceeds from fear. I guess Hunter thought Fear on the Campaign Trail didn't track as well.

-- Mal

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 01:33 PM

28. very promising appeal

. . . of course I enthusiastically endorse and would encourage this sentiment and perspective of yours.

I find that the more secure one is with their particular interest or cause, the more willing they are to listen to and consider other view points. I think that's always worthwhile, even if only to reinforce one's own opinion.

Thanks for these pertinent anecdotes, and, may DU realize the very best of our tendencies toward those we interact with.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 04:51 PM

33. Kicked and recommended.

Thanks for the thread, H2O Man.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 07:19 PM

34. You have inspired me.

I am standing having girt my loins about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness.

Now what?

I find that I am immobilized less by fear; more by an overwhelming sense of powerlessness. If I look for leadership, it is because I can't suss which action or even a direction for action. I wonder, must things get worse before they get better? Some days I think that is certainly so.

because everything is futility and striving after wind

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 07:32 PM

35. Remember that book title

Love is letting go of Fear. Premise was you can't do both at the same time. So fill your heart and beam it out. It only makes more. You won't run out. Start with yourself.

Most of the fear is perception driven by attitude. And that is a changeable dynamic. It is the only thing we can change. The wisdom is knowing the difference. Choose love not fear.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 09:47 PM

40. Thank you. K&R

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 10:31 PM

41. Satyagraha, I believe,

is an essential component of Gandhi's nonviolent dissent.

I hope you will advocate for Satyagraha.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 11:33 PM

42. That's really good.

"For better or for worse, it’s up to us. You and me."

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Wed Mar 20, 2013, 01:36 AM

43. Purge the gaslighters!

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Wed Mar 20, 2013, 02:03 AM

44. Inhale fear, exhale anger

such is the road to sickness...

Good article!

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Wed Mar 20, 2013, 03:21 AM

45. What Attracted a Peaceful Person Like You to a Bloody Sport Like Boxing?

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Response to AndyTiedye (Reply #45)

Wed Mar 20, 2013, 04:15 PM

47. Good question.

(I plan to respond to everyone on this thread; however, for the next 36 hours, I have a ton of school board business, plus a couple legal cases that I'm working on. But I keep thinking about your's, and want to take a minute to answer your question.)

Years ago, I recall that my mother had watched Mike Douglas or Merv Griffin ..... and she said there was a psychologist on who, among other things, discussed different personality types. He said that in his experience, most boxers were gentle people -- outside of the ring -- who were telling the world, "don't touch me."

Later this spring will be the 50th anniversary of my first boxing match. (Dang!) Safe to say that I've had 50 years of experience with the sport, and have known literally hundreds of guys who have boxed. I can only think of one who started boxing, as a happy, well-adjusted kid. And maybe I simply didn't know him well.

In my own case, I'd say that I was a nice, gentle kid, who was subjected to far too much violent and hateful abuse ..... at home, in my neighborhood, in school, and in the larger community. I do not say that feeling sorry for myself today ..... although I feel sorry for any kid who is subjected to that type of thing.

So, I learned to box. And it's fair to say that it was a way of saying "don't touch me." Luck for me, I was very good at it. When I was about to graduate from high school, Rubin told me to stop boxing, and go to college ..... to focus on becoming a person who could make a difference in the quality of life around me. Looking back now (from my 3rd or 4th childhood, I suppose), I'm glad that I listened to him.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Wed Mar 20, 2013, 07:23 AM

46. Peace

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