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Sat Feb 11, 2012, 01:17 PM

state by state speak your mind about...hawaii

Last edited Tue Feb 14, 2012, 02:11 AM - Edit history (1)

the only state to have a royal family
beautiful islands in the pacific
gateway to asia for many
i have always wanted to go to see the beaches, the ocean floor,the volcanos and the monster surf
known mostly as a vacation spot hawaii is an agriculural hot spot
cattle,and fruit shipped all over the world
i will go someday

34 replies, 10204 views

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Arrow 34 replies Author Time Post
Reply state by state speak your mind about...hawaii (Original post)
SwampG8r Feb 2012 OP
mainer Feb 2012 #1
ThatsMyBarack Feb 2012 #2
stevedeshazer Feb 2012 #3
zappaman Feb 2012 #4
Octafish Feb 2012 #5
zappaman Feb 2012 #7
opihimoimoi Feb 2012 #32
Tikki Feb 2012 #6
limpyhobbler Feb 2012 #8
ellisonz Feb 2012 #15
Sea-Dog Feb 2012 #9
SwampG8r Feb 2012 #11
Sea-Dog Feb 2012 #20
SwampG8r Feb 2012 #27
ellisonz Feb 2012 #12
Sea-Dog Feb 2012 #21
ellisonz Feb 2012 #23
Sea-Dog Feb 2012 #26
MichaelMcGuire Feb 2012 #29
MichaelMcGuire Feb 2012 #30
ellisonz Feb 2012 #33
MichaelMcGuire Feb 2012 #34
MineralMan Feb 2012 #10
ellisonz Feb 2012 #13
neverforget Feb 2012 #14
Warren DeMontague Feb 2012 #16
Little Star Feb 2012 #17
ellisonz Feb 2012 #19
GoCubsGo Feb 2012 #18
jeanpalmer Feb 2012 #22
JSK Feb 2012 #24
AngryAmish Feb 2012 #25
Douglas Carpenter Feb 2012 #28
Starry Messenger Feb 2012 #31

Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 01:21 PM

1. "The Descendants" a must-see: gets Hawaii pitch perfectly right

I lived there for over a decade. Rock fever got to me, but I do love going back just to visit.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 01:25 PM

2. I miss Hawaii....

I'd love to go back there and get drunk and sunburnt, but I'm not 22 anymore.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 01:58 PM

3. Never been there, but it sure looks good in pictures.

I hope visit some day.

Hawaii Five -O had the best TV theme song ever:

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 02:00 PM

4. Been there many times

Kauai being my favorite island.
Love the whole state!
Great people, great food, and, best of all, great attitude.
Hope to one day retire there...

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 02:04 PM

5. Aloha Spirits...



I heart Hawaii and every person I met there infinitely.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #5)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 02:11 PM

7. Beautiful photo! nt

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Response to Octafish (Reply #5)

Tue Feb 14, 2012, 06:17 AM

32. E#hhh You Bagahh....I recollect you took this pic ....LOL...

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 02:08 PM

6. Went there as a teen. It is lovely...

Only saw Oahu, though. Wish I could have seen other
Islands.


Tikki

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 07:08 PM

8. Home of the first Hawaiian president.


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Response to limpyhobbler (Reply #8)

Sun Feb 12, 2012, 04:25 AM

15. Born in Hawaii Nei



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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 08:33 PM

9. what's the story of how hawaii

 

became under rule from the us?

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Response to Sea-Dog (Reply #9)

Sun Feb 12, 2012, 12:33 AM

11. without checking for facts

i believe they were considered a vital shipping post of the us and japan and when the us thought the japanese were going to win the access we used gunboat diplomacy and made it a territory

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Response to SwampG8r (Reply #11)

Mon Feb 13, 2012, 07:00 AM

20. sounds illegal

 

I'm reading freehawaii.info

could be reading for weeks to understand this topic

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Response to Sea-Dog (Reply #20)

Tue Feb 14, 2012, 01:24 AM

27. was i close?

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Response to Sea-Dog (Reply #9)

Sun Feb 12, 2012, 01:28 AM

12. That is a very complex question.

In lieu of answering that question for you, I will refer you to some well-regarded sources to help you make that determination for yourself, which is infinitely more productive than any lecturing I could do, which in no small part would be based on my study of this history.

Dismembering Lahui: A History of the Hawaiian Nation to 1887

Jonathan Osorio investigates the effects of Western law on the national identity of Native Hawaiians in this impressive political history of the Kingdom of Hawai'i from the onset of constitutional government in 1840 to the Bayonet Constitution of 1887, which effectively placed political power in the kingdom in the hands of white businessmen. Making extensive use of legislative texts, contemporary newspapers, and important works by Hawaiian historians and others, Osorio plots the course of events that transformed Hawai'i from a traditional subsistence economy to a modern nation, taking into account the many individuals nearly forgotten by history who wrestled with each new political and social change. A final poignant chapter links past events with the struggle for Hawaiian sovereignty today.

http://www.amazon.com/Dismembering-Lahui-History-Hawaiian-Nation/dp/0824825497/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329023985&sr=1-1


Nation Within: The History of the American Occupation of Hawaii - By Tom Coffman,

The question, "How did the distant island kingdom of Hawaii become part of the United States?" has been buried by a combination of American mythology and American denial. But that question has taken on new urgency in context of Native Hawaiian demands for a restoration of self-government. The takeover of this independent nation of long standing was America's first confusing venture into overseas imperialism. As such, it was the antecedent to the colonization of the Philippines, the overthrow of numerous governments of weak but friendly nations and, currently, the occupation of Iraq. In 1893, only two percent of the kingdom of Hawaii's population was of American descent, but the colonizers in Hawaii and the architects of American expansion in Washington were importantly connected by common origins an intertwining of missionaries, financiers, sugar growers and politicians. Nation Within describes how, in the wake of the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893, an interim government of five years duration was established that borrowed heavily from the Jim Crow American south. In 1895, Hawaiians attempted a counterrevolution, and two hundred Hawaiians, along with their Queen, were jailed by a martial law court. After much resistance, Americans were pulled along into the imperial proposition by Theodore Roosevelt (then assistant secretary of the Navy) and the American philosopher of sea power, Alfred Mahan. Their multi-pronged strategy was based on controlling Latin America, building the Panama canal, and dominating the Pacific by controlling Hawaii. Did Native Hawaiians really go along with this, as has so ofte been claimed? The answer lay dormant nearly a hundred years in the American archive: Native petitions vigorously protesting annexation submitted by virtually every living Hawaiian. An additional six petitions were submitted to the U.S. Congress by the Hawaiian leadership. They hoped to get their country back, but their efforts were crushed by the Spanish-American War, which began not in Cuba (as most people imagine) but with destruction of the Spanish fleet in the Philippines. When American troops were committed to put down the Filipinos, Hawaii became the forward base for a new Pacific empire the sovereignty of its people and their nation extinguished.

http://www.amazon.com/Nation-Within-History-American-Occupation/dp/0982165609/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1329023825&sr=8-2


Another good read is Lilikala Kame'eleihiwa's "Native Land and Foreign Desires: Pehea LA E Pono Ai? How Shall We Live in Harmony?"

http://www.amazon.com/Native-Land-Foreign-Desires-Harmony/dp/0930897595/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329024172&sr=1-1-fkmr0

And: Ronald Takaki's "Pau Hana: Plantation Life and Labor in Hawaii, 1835-1920"

http://www.amazon.com/Pau-Hana-Plantation-Hawaii-1835-1920/dp/0824809564/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329024372&sr=1-1

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Response to ellisonz (Reply #12)

Mon Feb 13, 2012, 07:05 AM

21. thanks what's your view of the1959 statehood vote?

 

Last edited Mon Feb 13, 2012, 04:27 PM - Edit history (1)

www.statehoodhawaii.org/pleb_prec.html

seems to state foul play

thanks

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Response to Sea-Dog (Reply #21)

Mon Feb 13, 2012, 03:21 PM

23. Your link doesn't work.

The vote for statehood was overwhelming, it had little to do with feelings about the overthrow, the clock was not going to be turned back. Also, you need to consider the demographic changes of the state.

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Response to ellisonz (Reply #23)

Mon Feb 13, 2012, 04:44 PM

26. should work now. speller on phone changes stuff when you are not looking

 

a few Hawaiians seem to think it was foul. on the free Hawaii links.

say its occupied? not annexed.


thanks
[link:www.hawaiifakestate.com/Hawaii_-_Not_A_State.html|

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Response to Sea-Dog (Reply #26)

Tue Feb 14, 2012, 04:54 AM

29. Doesn't work, however I've found the page.

 

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Response to Sea-Dog (Reply #21)

Tue Feb 14, 2012, 05:07 AM

30. I take it you mean this?

 

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Reply #30)

Fri Feb 24, 2012, 05:01 AM

33. Eh...that's da kine!

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Response to ellisonz (Reply #33)

Fri Feb 24, 2012, 07:01 AM

34. Pidgin?

 

thing-a-ma-bob?

or

Whit ye mis caas it!

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sat Feb 11, 2012, 09:34 PM

10. Birthplace of our President!

What's not to like. Haven't been there yet.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sun Feb 12, 2012, 01:35 AM

13. I would like to invite anybody...

...interested in learning more about life in Hawaii to check out the DU Hawai'i Group, which I labor to make an online home and news resource for all who love Hawai'i at DU.

DU Hawaii Group



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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sun Feb 12, 2012, 01:55 AM

14. I lived in Honolulu for 11 months btw 2009-2010. Loved living there

except for the traffic. The weather was awesome!

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sun Feb 12, 2012, 05:29 AM

16. Beautiful. Expensive, but beautiful.

Would never turn down an opportunity to go. Just gorgeous.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sun Feb 12, 2012, 09:24 AM

17. There are not enough adjectives to describe the stunning beauty that is Hawaii…

I know this just from seeing pictures and reading.

Six islands: Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Maui and the big one, Hawaii Island. How the heck could any average person have enough money to really visit and see all there is to see there?

Here is a link to their Official Tourism Website:
http://www.gohawaii.com/

I’ve never been but some day maybe, some day.

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Response to Little Star (Reply #17)

Mon Feb 13, 2012, 03:35 AM

19. Eh!

No foget Ni'ihau (you can go there on a private tour) or Kaho'olawe (you can go there if you like volunteer).

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Sun Feb 12, 2012, 09:28 AM

18. I cried when the plane took off for home.

I didn't want to leave. I only got to see 3 of the islands. Wish I could go back and see the others. I would move there in a heartbeat, as expensive and isolated as it is.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Mon Feb 13, 2012, 07:43 AM

22. Surfing is great

Used to do it at various locations. Until I read "Deadly Sharks of Hawaii." It caused me to restrict my surfing to certain close-in areas, mainly on the South shore.

Weather is best from December to mid-March. High 80, low 70, every day. Can't beat it.

If you have the time, it can be cheaper to rent a nicer condo for a month than a hotel room for 2 weeks.

There are more homeless people since the great recession began. Many have taken up residence on the beach areas of the West side of Oahu, although many live on the streets of Honolulu. The main government policy seems to be, "roust them til they leave." If one of them is causing a "problem" at the beach, the police are called and when they put their blue rubber gloves on his time as a free man on the beach is limited. They say there are homeless shelters, but they're so infested with bedbugs the homeless would rather live on the streets.

Other than that, and the cost of living, it's paradise if you have the coin.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Mon Feb 13, 2012, 03:46 PM

24. No private beaches!

The beaches in Hawaii belong to the people, which means that even the most luxurious and exclusive hotels cannot kick someone off their beach if they wish to walk, sun or swim there. Same goes for private 'beach-front' residences that sell in the millions.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Mon Feb 13, 2012, 03:54 PM

25. It appears to be made up mostly of islands.

 

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Feb 14, 2012, 04:54 AM

28. and/or take a trip farther east to The U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

Where America's day begins


I've been here for seven months now. It is like nowhere else on earth. It is like simultaneously being in Asia and America, the first world and the third world all at the same time.

It has the clearest and bluest blue sea on earth. The most spectacular diving anywhere.

The Northern Mariana Islands, officially the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), is a commonwealth in political union with the United States, occupying a strategic region of the western Pacific Ocean. It consists of 15 islands about three-quarters of the way from Hawaii to the Philippines. The United States Census Bureau reports the total land area of all islands as 179.01 square miles (463.63 km2).

The Northern Mariana Islands has a population of 53,883 (2010 census).[2] More than 90% of the population lives on the island of Saipan. Of the fourteen other islands, only two — Tinian and Rota — have a significant population. The islands of Agrihan and Alamagan have fewer than ten residents each, and the remaining islands are unpopulated.

The Commonwealth's center of government is in the village of Capital Hill on Saipan. As the island is governed as a single municipality, most publications name Saipan as the Commonwealth's capital.

The Northern Mariana Islands, officially the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), is a commonwealth in political union with the United States, occupying a strategic region of the western Pacific Ocean. It consists of 15 islands about three-quarters of the way from Hawaii to the Philippines. The United States Census Bureau reports the total land area of all islands as 179.01 square miles (463.63 km2).

The Northern Mariana Islands has a population of 53,883 (2010 census).[2] More than 90% of the population lives on the island of Saipan. Of the fourteen other islands, only two — Tinian and Rota — have a significant population. The islands of Agrihan and Alamagan have fewer than ten residents each, and the remaining islands are unpopulated.

The Commonwealth's center of government is in the village of Capital Hill on Saipan. As the island is governed as a single municipality, most publications name Saipan as the Commonwealth's capital.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Mariana_Islands



Some Photos of Saipan










Rota



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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Feb 14, 2012, 05:25 AM

31. Insanely beautiful.

The history is incredible. Hiking around lava fields, Pearl Harbor, excellent coffee, snorkeling to die for, great museums and breathing air like wine. I've been three times and hated to leave.

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