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Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:29 PM

state by state speak your mind about oklahoma

this is another state I have yet to visit
the name is from native meaning red peoples land
major oil and gas producer
lots of cattle there
humans have lived there since the ice age
as an eastern band member it saddens me that many of my relations were forced there
its called the sooner state because of the people who basically cheated during the land rush
Oklahoma is home to one of the most egregious instances of race war in American history
an act so damaging that AA oklahomans are still affected by it today and which at the time destroyed one of black Americas proudest populations,a group that was so successful the term black wall street was invented to describe it
Oklahoma today has interests in communications, food production ,aviation and electronics to name but a few
Oklahoma is a leader in wind generated power
#5 in cattle and wheat production
6 governments have claimed Oklahoma in its history and 67 tribal bands call it home
Scottish, Irish, German, Italian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Czech, Jewish, Arab, Mexican and African-Americans all call Oklahoma home
ok okies its on you now...tell us why you love/hate oklahoma

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Arrow 46 replies Author Time Post
Reply state by state speak your mind about oklahoma (Original post)
SwampG8r Jul 2013 OP
curlyred Jul 2013 #1
notadmblnd Jul 2013 #2
curlyred Jul 2013 #7
DURHAM D Jul 2013 #14
MuseRider Jul 2013 #23
opiate69 Jul 2013 #3
Warpy Jul 2013 #4
sammytko Jul 2013 #5
Agnosticsherbet Jul 2013 #6
Arctic Dave Jul 2013 #8
DURHAM D Jul 2013 #9
cynatnite Jul 2013 #18
functioning_cog Jul 2013 #10
Brother Buzz Jul 2013 #11
bmbmd Jul 2013 #12
Rowdyboy Jul 2013 #13
DURHAM D Jul 2013 #15
Rowdyboy Jul 2013 #19
cynatnite Jul 2013 #16
wtmusic Jul 2013 #17
OriginalGeek Jul 2013 #20
PD Turk Jul 2013 #21
DURHAM D Jul 2013 #22
PD Turk Jul 2013 #24
cynatnite Jul 2013 #31
MuseRider Jul 2013 #25
DURHAM D Jul 2013 #28
MuseRider Jul 2013 #32
BainsBane Jul 2013 #26
steve2470 Jul 2013 #27
dogknob Jul 2013 #29
OxQQme Jul 2013 #30
Behind the Aegis Jul 2013 #33
kevinbgoode1 Jul 2013 #37
Behind the Aegis Jul 2013 #38
SwampG8r Jul 2013 #46
PufPuf23 Jul 2013 #34
Buns_of_Fire Jul 2013 #35
Blue_In_AK Jul 2013 #36
cali Jul 2013 #39
beemer27 Jul 2013 #40
AndyA Jul 2013 #41
OKNancy Jul 2013 #43
Aristus Jul 2013 #42
raccoon Jul 2013 #44
geek tragedy Jul 2013 #45

Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:33 PM

1. Grew up there in the sixties

Good people who would do just about anything for you. We roamed the neighborhood like most kids did back then. But absolutely no people of color - not a one. Always thought that was odd.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:34 PM

2. Oklahoma where the wind comes sweeping down the plain


Where the wav-in wheat can sure smell sweet
When the wind comes right behind the rain
Oklahoma ev'ry night my honey lamb and I
Sit alone and talk and watch a hawk
Makin lazy circles in the sky

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Response to notadmblnd (Reply #2)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:56 PM

7. Amazing, isn't it?

We know all the words to the state song.

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Response to notadmblnd (Reply #2)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:39 PM

14. In the late 70s I traveled by car with two friends in Europe,

including Eastern Europe. At the East German border when they checked our passports they noticed that two of us were from Oklahoma. Several of the guards came over to the car (yes, they really do have German Shepherds) and they made motions like they were shooting a bow and arrow, raised two fingers behind their heads (feathers), made war hoops and danced. And then one of them sang "Oklahoma" as the others clapped and they laughed and laughed.

We were surprised but the best was yet to come.

Ten days later we drove into Poland. The border crossing process was slow. We handed over our passports and suddenly there was a lot of excitement among the guards as they all rushed to gather around our car. Even the guards in the shacks came out. We became very concerned about the activity...but then they burst into song. They sang a very spirited rendition of "Oklahoma" They knew every word. The guards closed the border for about an hour to talk to us. They had a million questions. (One of my traveling partners speaks Polish) The people in line got out of their cars to come forward and see what all the excitement was about. As they come up and were told we were from Oklahoma they too would start singing. It was truly amazing.

At every border we crossed a reference was made to Native Americans and to the musical. Until that trip I had not realized the reach of American musical theater and Oklahoma in particular.

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Response to DURHAM D (Reply #14)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:10 AM

23. THAT right there is a fabulous story!

In 1971 I was at Brevard Music Camp in North Carolina. It was an international, auditioned camp so there were a lot of different people there. Being from Kansas I was asked about the Indians and about the Pony Express and of course, like Oklahoma the Wizard Of Oz was the topic.

I was actually astonished at how some young people from this country still thought we were in the middle of the wars with the Native American population.

LOVE your story.

You know we belong to the land, Yo Ho!
And the land we belong to is grand!

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:43 PM

3. The company I work for is headquartered in Tulsa...

 

Never been there... the people I have met/talked to from corporate all seem like damned decent folk though. Waaaay too far away from clam digging and crab fishing for my liking though. Lol

I work for this outfit: http://www.thecrosbygroup.com/

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:46 PM

4. Nicest people in the world

Nothing much there but cows, grass and oil wells. Country looks flat, has low, rolling hills. Humid as hell in the summer.

Some of the shittiest preachers and politicians the country has ever seen and yes, they go hand in hand like the Bobbsey Twins. Nice people deserve better and need to start voting against the shitbags and refusing to go to wingnut churches.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:52 PM

5. Lived there for five years - Altus AFB - OK - people were very nice

If I had to, wouldn't be a bad place to live.

Loved poking around the small towns and vintage stores. OKC isn't bad either.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:56 PM

6. Grew up in Blackwell, Oklahoma...

which I was told was a sundown town until the civil rights act.

My memories are decades out of date, but for a kid under the age of 11 it was a good place to live. After 11 I visited each summer until my Grandparents died.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:57 PM

8. I've only driven through it years ago. Don't remeber much about it.

 

I work with guys from there. Oilfield people.

Them seem nice but they do have an underlying racist streak when in "proper" company.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 10:58 PM

9. It has red dirt.

Oklahoma has beautiful lakes and more shoreline than the gulf and East coast combined.

Downtown OKC is amazing.

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Response to DURHAM D (Reply #9)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:52 PM

18. We had a bad dust storm one time when we lived in Moore...

My mother spent a week getting the red dirt out of our clothes.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:02 PM

10. I spent time in the Oklahoma panhandle. My maternal grandfather was born there

 

I spent 5 of my critical teen years just north of the Oklahoma border in southwest Kansas.

That area is full of churches, oil wells, and Republicans. Very status oriented white folks but with some Mexican, African American, and Southeast Asian population.

Not a big fan of the place back then, and later as I became interested in politics...REALLY hate what that state is all about.

I would love to meet more progressive people from there--in fact, one of my high school classmates moved to Oklahoma his senior year and has lived there ever since. He is liberal and HATES the predominant opinions around there. It is funny to see the flame wars started on his Facebook wall when he decides to let forth with an opinion about a current event.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:09 PM

11. Will Rogers

The best export the state ever produced. That, and Tom Joad.


Tom Joad: I been thinking about us, too, about our people living like pigs and good rich land layin' fallow. Or maybe one guy with a million acres and a hundred thousand farmers starvin'. And I been wonderin' if all our folks got together and yelled...

Ma Joad: Oh, Tommy, they'd drag you out and cut you down just like they done to Casy.

Tom Joad: They'd drag me anyways. Sooner or later they'd get me for one thing if not for another. Until then...

Ma Joad: Tommy, you're not aimin' to kill nobody.

Tom Joad: No, Ma, not that. That ain't it. It's just, well as long as I'm an outlaw anyways... maybe I can do somethin'... maybe I can just find out somethin', just scrounge around and maybe find out what it is that's wrong and see if they ain't somethin' that can be done about it. I ain't thought it out all clear, Ma. I can't. I don't know enough.

Ma Joad: How am I gonna know about ya, Tommy? Why they could kill ya and I'd never know. They could hurt ya. How am I gonna know?

Tom Joad: Well, maybe it's like Casy says. A fellow ain't got a soul of his own, just little piece of a big soul, the one big soul that belongs to everybody, then...

Ma Joad: Then what, Tom?

Tom Joad: Then it don't matter. I'll be all around in the dark - I'll be everywhere. Wherever you can look - wherever there's a fight, so hungry people can eat, I'll be there. Wherever there's a cop beatin' up a guy, I'll be there. I'll be in the way guys yell when they're mad. I'll be in the way kids laugh when they're hungry and they know supper's ready, and when the people are eatin' the stuff they raise and livin' in the houses they build - I'll be there, too.

Ma Joad: I don't understand it, Tom.

Tom Joad: Me, neither, Ma, but - just somethin' I been thinkin' about.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:10 PM

12. My friends and neighbors,

Just across the Red River from me. Eastern Oklahoma is beautiful, with ancient mountains, free flowing rivers, and amazing Native American culture. They are my bitter enemies once a year when the rivalry comes to Dallas-but the rest of the year, they are dear friends. The border is rough and meth-infested, but there remains a nucleus of smart, patriotic, industrious, proud Okies who love their families and their country. They even love their neighbors to the south.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:19 PM

13. One of the most progressive Senators of the last 50 years represented Oklahoma. Fred Harris

who was an early political hero of mine spoke at my college commencement the year he ran for president (1976). His former wife, LaDonna was an Native-American activist who was a hero in her own right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_R._Harris

In 1964 Harris entered the race to serve out the unexpired term of United States Senator Robert S. Kerr, who had died in office. He was successful, defeating former Governor J. Howard Edmondson, who had been appointed to succeed Kerr, in the Democratic primary, then narrowly upsetting Republican nominee and legendary Oklahoma football coach Bud Wilkinson by 51% to 49%, and was sworn in as soon as the vote totals could be verified, becoming, again, one of the youngest members of the body in which he was serving. Despite being fairly liberal from an increasingly conservative state, he was elected to a full term in 1966, defeating attorney Pat H. Patterson by a 54% to 46% margin. During this Senate term, he also served briefly as chairman of the Democratic National Committee, being both preceded and succeeded in that position by Larry O'Brien. Harris was one of the final two candidates considered by Vice President and Presidential nominee Hubert Humphrey to be the Democratic Party's nominee for Vice President of the United States in 1968; Humphrey ultimately chose Senator Edmund Muskie of Maine due to Harris' young age (37) at the time.[1] Humphrey, according to former DNC Chair Lawrence O'Brien, chose Senator Muskie at the very last minute.

In 1970, Harris was a major mover in the eventually successful legislation to restore to the inhabitants of the Taos Pueblo 48,000 acres (194 km²) of mountain land taken by President Theodore Roosevelt and designated as the Carson National Forest early in the 20th century.[2] The struggle was particularly emotive since this return of Taos land included Blue Lake, which the people of the Pueblo traditionally consider sacred. To pass this bill Harris forged a bipartisan alliance with then President Richard Nixon, from whom Harris was sharply divided on numerous other issues, notably the Vietnam War. In doing so, he had to overcome the powerful fellow Democratic Senators Clinton Anderson and Scoop Jackson, who were firmly opposed to return of the Taos lands. As recounted by Harris' wife LaDonna, who was actively involved in the struggle, when the bill was finally passed and came up to be signed by the President, Nixon looked up and said: "I can't believe I'm signing a bill that was sponsored by Fred Harris.".[3]

In 1971, Harris was the only Senator to vote against confirmation of Lewis Franklin Powell, Jr. to be Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court.[4] He also called for abolishing the Interstate Commerce Commission

Harris did not seek another Senate term in 1972, choosing instead to make a run for President on a campaign for "economic democracy".[6][7] That bid was short-lived but he ran again in 1976. Harris' second bid for President had at least two unusual features. For one, in order to keep expenses down, he traveled the country in a RV and stayed in private homes, giving his hosts a card which was to be redeemable for one night's stay in the White House upon his election. For another, he placed unusual stress on issues affecting the working class. He also pushed for Native American issues. This was due to his background – his former wife LaDonna Harris is of Native American Comanche ancestry, and had been deeply involved in Native American activism in her own right. Moreover, he was from the state which had begun its political existence as Indian Territory. After a surprising fourth-place finish in the Iowa caucuses, Harris coined the term "winnowed in", saying "The winnowing-out process has begun and we have just been 'winnowed in'". Harris won more than 10% of the vote, pushing Mo Udall, who was at one point leading the polls, into fifth place. Harris would be "winnowed out" just over a month later. He finished fourth in the New Hampshire primary and a week after that he finished fifth in the Vermont primary and third in the Massachusetts primary with just 7%. Harris remained in the contest for another month, with his best showing a fourth-placed finish in Illinois with 8%

http://www.ou.edu/special/albertctr/archives/exhibit/harris/harris3[1].jpg

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Response to Rowdyboy (Reply #13)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:46 PM

15. Good post.

Fred and LaDonna are two of my favorite Oklahomans.

Also, whenever I hear Senator Warren speak I hear her populous Okie roots.

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Response to DURHAM D (Reply #15)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:54 PM

19. She and Fred share an basic attitude and philosophy....

One that I truly appreciate. It used to be a lot more prevalent among Democrats back in the day.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:50 PM

16. I grew up there. It's my home...

I learned farming, cattle, how to drive a tractor, bail hay, and all the typical farming stuff if you were raised in a rural area. There are times the wheat, hay, and alfalfa would be so beautiful across the plains with the setting sun, it would take your breath away.

I had the best Dad in the world in Oklahoma and he's still there...buried in the hometown we all loved.

I miss home sometimes, but it's nearly impossible to make a living there.

I know it's a red state with repukes governing it to the point of idiocy. It sickens me sometimes.

But it's my home still and I love it. I won't apologize or be ashamed of that.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:51 PM

17. Well...it's not Kansas, and it's not Texas. nt

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Tue Jul 30, 2013, 11:54 PM

20. The farthest into OK I've been

is the Oklahoma side of Lake Texoma. That was when I was a kid. When I was a little older I enjoyed some Oklahoma home grown on occasion - but only when good stuff was hard to find....I got nothing against Oklahoma though. I have a few friends that moved there and I know a few others from there

Overall my limited experience with Oklahoma is net positive. Boomer Sooners! (Actually, I like watching the OK State Cowboys play football but my high school friend is a Sooner fan and I know that slogan).

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:00 AM

21. I have lived here all my life

I have a love/hate relationship with OK, but never seem to leave lol.

Woody Guthrie, Will Rogers, Leon Russell, JJ Cale, Dwight Twilley, David Gates, GAP Band, James Garner, Garth Brooks... you can name famous people from OK for days and still not name all of them. Also, OK has produced more astronauts than any other state

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #21)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:06 AM

22. And at one point Oklahoma held the record for number of Rhodes Scholars.

OU has had 29.

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Response to DURHAM D (Reply #22)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:15 AM

24. Indeed

As much as I hate to admit it since I'm a OSU Cowboys fan, OU has some really great academic programs.

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Response to PD Turk (Reply #21)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:34 AM

31. Ron Howard was born in Duncan...

I spent a few years in OKC, but the bulk of my growing up years were in NW Oklahoma.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:16 AM

25. Been there many many times

as a kid and as an adult. I actually really like the state. Great, kind people there. It is interesting looking with the red dirt in some places. Interesting little towns we used to stop in when i was a kid on the way to Texas from NE Kansas.

One thing that is really interesting that I don't think I saw mentioned. The Arbuckle Mountains. For most of my young life those were the only mountains I had ever seen.

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Response to MuseRider (Reply #25)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:26 AM

28. Speaking of interesting little towns...

Have you been to Boley?

"Boley was one of the wealthiest Negro towns in the US. It boasted the first nationally chartered bank owned by blacks, and its own electric company. Booker T. Washington visited Boley in 1905, and was so impressed that he included Boley in his speeches."



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boley,_Oklahoma

We used to drive through it on the way to Muskogee to see relatives.

ETA: All Black Towns in Oklahoma

The All-Black towns of Oklahoma represent a unique chapter in American history. Nowhere else, neither in the Deep South nor in the Far West, did so many African American men and women come together to create, occupy, and govern their own communities. From 1865 to 1920 African Americans created more than fifty identifiable towns and settlements, some of short duration and some still existing at the beginning of the twenty-first century.



http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/a/al009.html

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Response to DURHAM D (Reply #28)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:53 AM

32. No I have not.

I am recalling from our every year vacation to Dallas where my Grandfather lived. We would always poke around I35 since we were trying to get there fairly quickly. No air conditioning in the car, usually in August. We would almost always stop for gas in Perry (I remember seeing my first horny toad there) and stop then for a packed lunch in either Guthrie, Purcell or Paul's Valley depending on the time and how often my father had to stop to swat us.

There were always interesting characters, that i remember, mostly from the late 50's early 60's. Gas station guys or kids in the parks we would drive to to eat or run off excess energy.

Boley sounds interesting. I have not poked around there in years. Used to go to music symposiums at OU every year and occasionally we head to Tulsa for a concert. I need to poke around some more in the smaller towns and try to study up before I go there. Boley sounds interesting to visit. Thanks!

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:18 AM

26. I've driven through on the way to and from Texas

That's the extent of my experience with the state.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:20 AM

27. drove through in 1984, have not been back since

I vividly remember the summer dry heat and the beautiful waves of wildflowers by the road.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:27 AM

29. Great show. A little "racy" for my community's theatre scene...

...I live in Capo Beach, CA

The people who fund our theatre are the the same people who voted for our congressman, Darrell Issa.

They recently strung along the San Clemente theatre's production of "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest" until about a week before it was scheduled to open, then killed it.

They're really into the "get-them-to-submit-by-showing-them-how-futile-their-efforts-will-always-be" thing around here.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:29 AM

30. The morning TV schedule

leaves Kelly and Michael not shown in OKC, yet the locals adore their mostly 'black' Thunder basketball team.

I have family there that I visited for two months earlier this year.


The tallest elevation in Oklahoma seems to be an Interstate overpass.

Eischens in Okarche gets a big thumbs up. http://eischensbar.com/menu.html

Bars and churches are about equal in number.

After the last two twisters (one that missed them by less than a mile) I suggested their moving out here to Portland, OR where we only have to contend with a volcano eruption once every 500 years. lol

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 01:06 AM

33. I currently live in Oklahoma.

That makes me an Oklahomo.

I moved to OK in 1999 to work for OSU. After I left, I moved to OKC for just under a year, then moved to NE OK, where we currently live again, after a 5 year stint in New Orleans. We are a few miles from the KS border, so we slip over there every now and again, but usually prefer to go to Tulsa. Personally, I think Tulsa is a really nice city; it reminds me of east coast cities. I don't care for OKC; too spread out and industrial for my tastes. I have been to gay pride festivals in both cities. They are about the same, but the funny things is, they compete with one another. LOL!

There are some really good schools here. Lots...and I mean shitloads, of churches. It is difficult to find houses of worship for other groups, though there are a few mosques in some smaller cities, they are rare, and so are synagogues. Where I live just got a Jewish community center this year! The closest synagogue is in Tulsa, which actually has a sizable Jewish population; or, it used to have one. Finding religious items for anyone other than Christians is a fucking chore. When I had a Jewish friend die, I went to the Hallmark store to get a card. There was ONE Jewish sympathy card and it was completely in Hebrew (thankfully, the family was fluent...I am not though).

The people are hit or miss, but I am finding that is the truth in most places nowadays. There are some really wonderful people here, very liberal and open-minded, and some....well...I'll be nice. Of course, the best person this state produced is, of course, my partner of almost 12 years! He is a born and raised Okie. I will say that in a crisis, the people here are some of the biggest hearted people I have met! Their own houses can be gone, but they will make sure their neighbors are cared for as well. IMO, they can be some of the most generous people you will know!

The worst thing about OK is the fucking weather!!! Scorching summers, wet and cold winters, no real spring or fall (two weeks doesn't really count) and then there is the TORNADOES! It is funny to me how many will complain about humidity. Sure, there are times it is humid, but for the most part, it is pretty dry. Given I lived in the deep South most of my life, and New Orleans for 5 years; I know humidity! Did I mention the tornadoes?! OH yeah...and we have some fierce...scare the Devil fierce, thunderstorms! I am sure I mentioned the tornadoes!

There are some really neat and unique places in Oklahoma. If you get a chance, you really should visit. The zoos are really cool. The Cherokee nation is located here. There are TONS of lakes; there are even mountains. During the two weeks of fall, take the Muskogee Turnpike and see the leaves change. It is beautiful! Wollaroc Park has wild buffaloes and game that roam free. You can also get some really good photos here!

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Reply #33)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 04:14 AM

37. You'll have to do a weekend in Eureka Springs, Arkansas

If you haven't been there, it is in the hilly northwestern end of the state. Quite a lovely, eclectic little town that relishes their celebration of everyone and everything. They have a huge outdoor Passion Play (and that giant milk carton Jesus) but also have two gay pride festivals each year, a UFO conference, biker weekends. . .haha. There is a rather substantial number of gays living in that area though there are no designated "clubs" - the little town prides itself on having every little bar/restaurant be welcoming of everyone. It's also quite a beautiful area.

I spent a few days a few years ago in OKC on the way to doing some research in New Mexico - and stayed at that Habana Inn place at the time. We'll just say that was quite an interesting experience. All I remember about Tulsa is driving through...the expressway speed limit is like 75 or something, isn't it? Whoosh. . .

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Response to kevinbgoode1 (Reply #37)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 04:19 AM

38. Hey you! I was thinking about you the other day!

Ahh...The Habana, now there is an interesting "hotel." LOL! And yes, we have some interesting speed limits.

Hope you are well.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Reply #33)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:56 PM

46. omg

when I wrote the last sentence it said ok okies oklahomans and oklahomos but I changed it
but I thought I would be taken wrong and distract from the OP
thanks for replying and for letting me know im twisted but not bad twisted!

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 01:17 AM

34. Oklahoma is one of the few states I have never visited.

The others are North Dakota, West Virginia, and Indiana.

However,

1) My ex MIL (RIP) was one of the feistiest good persons lb for lb I have ever met was born in Enid and came to the San Joaquin Valley of CA in the 1940s and had 11 children.

2) Jim Thompson is one of my very favorite genre authors of fiction.

3) Oklahoma, the musical.

4) One of my best friends was born in OK and is Karuk (CA Tribe), Cherokee, Mexican, and Scotch-Irish. She might beat my ex MIL by the same positive measures.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 02:21 AM

35. I graduated Jr. High School in Midwest City (a suburb of OKC).

I did a Google Maps search on my old address a couple of years ago (yes, I still remember it). The house was gone, wiped off the face of the earth by the 1999 tornadoes -- along with most of the neighborhood.

As I remember, there were good people there, along with some not-so-good people. Just like everywhere else.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 03:19 AM

36. The corn is as high as an elephant's eye.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 05:15 AM

39. I've only driven through a couple of times

 

not my cup of tea as far as the landscape goes. Politically I think it's a horror show, but I'm sure that lots of people who live there love it.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 10:11 AM

40. A happy transplant.

We moved here in 98, and haven't regretted it a bit. The people are almost all friendly, and the climate agrees with me. There are twisters, high temp days, high humidity days, periods of drought, and it will even snow a day or two in the winter. None of this bothers me much. Every state has something that people complain about, and if our major complaint is weather, that's the way it is. I live in the NE part of the state. It is called Green Country, and rightly so. We have a lot of green because of the climate, and we get a bit more rain than the rest of the state. There are many lakes (most are man-made) and miles and miles of shore line. The trees are not as tall as those in other states, but that just give you a better view of the sky. It is not all flat like many people believe, we have lots of hills, and some pretty interesting scenery. The town that I live in has a low crime rate, excellent services, and gives the citizens a voice in all major matters. One of the best parts, for me at least, is that Oklahoma treats it's Veterans much better than most states. As a 100% disabled vet, I pay no property taxes, no sale taxes, and can buy a car with no excise tax every three years. That is like getting a raise just for living here. The politics vary a lot. You can hear the most right-wing rants and some of the most progressive rants within a few minutes of each other, and in the same place. Don't assume that because we are in the Bible Belt that every one is conservative. You would be very wrong. The Federal level politicians are selected, and elected, for the same reasons that other states elect theirs. The bring home the bacon. And as long as the continue to do that, they will get elected, and re-elected. That is the way politics work in America.
Everything considered, I am happy that I am an Okie.







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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 10:32 AM

41. Not all of Oklahoma is dry, flat plains

The Tulsa area is actually quite hilly and very lush with lots of big trees and mature plants.

Tulsa ranks #3 in the United States for surviving Art Deco architecture--right behind New York City and Miami Beach.

Tulsa is home to two of the world's finest museums--Gilcrease and Philbrook. People literally travel from all over the world to visit these museums. Philbrook is in Waite Phillips' mansion, which is incredible to see in and of itself.

Most would be shocked to see how affordable houses are in Tulsa. Whenever I have visitors from out of state, they think my house cost a fortune. It would, where they come from. I've often wondered why people pay so much for housing and get so little in return. Sure, it's great to have lots of things to do nearby, but you can't spend all of your time away from home, if you could you wouldn't need a home. It's shocking what some people pay for real estate in parts of this country, basically buying a shack for $400,000.

The BOK Center, designed by César Pelli, is one of the world's top 20 venues and many of the top performers have stated it has perhaps the best acoustical properties of any place they've played.

Over the years, Tulsa has been named the Oil Capitol of the World, America's Most Livable City, and America's Most Beautiful City, among others.

The right wing political climate is perhaps the biggest hindrance to the area. There are lots of rural, country bumpkin-type people around, and they tend to lean to the right, just as they do in most of the country. However, there is a growing progressive base, and Oklahoma historically has been controlled by Democrats more often than Republicans, and most registered voters here are Democrats, last I heard.

I've lived in lots of other cities, and I think Tulsa is one of the best. The streets are laid out in a grid, and are named after other cities in the United States. They are in alphabetical order, with streets on the east side of town named after cities east of the Mississippi, and streets on the west side named after cities west of the Mississippi.

We have nice weather most of the time, and lots of sunshine. Severe periods of extreme heat or cold are usually short lived, and in between are many days of near perfect weather.

Tulsa is near lots of other great cities a day's drive or less away--St. Louis, Kansas City, Oklahoma City, Dallas/Fort Worth, Albuquerque, Little Rock, etc., so it's easy to get away when you want to. There's tons of lakes in Oklahoma--I think the state has more shoreline than the east and gulf coasts combined.

If you haven't visited, you should. It's really very nice here...and if we can get the political climate to change, which I think is going to happen as the population changes, one of the biggest negatives to the area will be removed.

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Response to AndyA (Reply #41)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:09 PM

43. Tulsa is a NICE town. Largest Unitarian church in the USA

http://www.allsoulschurch.org/#

Personally even the rednecks I meet are darn nice.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 10:44 AM

42. My father was born and raised in Oklahoma City.

He joined the Air Force when he was 18, and scooted out of there as fast as he could.

I still have family who live there, and I lost a cousin in the Federal building bombing in 1995. But other than that, I have no attachment to the state, and no desire to ever live there.

One interesting feature: The Devil's Graveyard, north of OK City; an unusual geologic formation that looks like odd, rough-looking gravestones as far as the eye can see in both directions on either side of the highway.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:14 PM

44. They should change the state song to "Oklahoma Hills." Yeah, I know that it's the official state

folk song.

But I still think it should be the state song.

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Response to SwampG8r (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 12:17 PM

45. First Oklahoman I ever met was in D.C.

 

he told me that he wanted to find where Earl Warren was buried "so I can dance on that liberal's grave."

Apparently, that's the mentality, given the fact that Tom Coburn is the liberal Senator from that state.

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