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Thu Nov 7, 2013, 05:31 PM

'Women Voters' Aren't Monolithic: Terry McAuliffe Can Thank Black Women For His Win

On Tuesday night, as Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe eked out a win over Republican Ken Cuccinelli in the Virginia gubernatorial race, both the media and reproductive rights organizations heralded his victory as a win for and by women. Exit polls revealed that while 45 percent percent percent of men voted for McAuliffe, 51 percent percent percent of women did, revealing a gender gap of six percentage points. But if we dig deeper, we begin to see a recurring trend within that gender gap and the gender gap of recent presidential elections: it is women of color, particularly black women, who help drive it.

The gender gap in voting patterns is nothing new. It first emerged in 1980, when it was revealed that Ronald Reagan had won the presidency with more votes from men than women. In fact, the Center for American Women in Politics shows that a gender gap has been present in every single election since the presidential election of 1980. Overall, women tend to vote more Democratic, and men tend to vote more Republican. Hence, the gender gap.

Yet, as we all too well know, women are not a monolith, and their voting patterns reflect that.

Women are not quite the cohesive voting bloc that political scientists have seen with African-Americans, Hispanics/Latinos or members of the LGBTQ community. Pundits, pollsters and politicians alike often opine about which way the "women's vote" will go in any given election, rhetorically framing women as a cohesive voting bloc despite evidence to the contrary. Because women are such a large group and constitute the majority of the American electorate, they continue to garner significant media coverage and political speculation. Additionally, the gender gap is not nearly as pronounced as the partisan divide between white voters and black and Latino voters.

In post-election cycles, the gender gap can become yet another way to reinforce the mythical narrative of the monolithic women's vote.

Much has been made about the gender gap in both of President Obama's elections. In 2008, the gender gap was 7 percentage points, despite the presence of Sarah Palin as the vice-presidential nominee on the Republican ticket. The gender gap then notably increased in 2012, to 10 percentage points in favor of President Barack Obama over Republican nominee Mitt Romney in what was heralded as a women-dominated election. Fifty-five percent of women voting for Obama compared with only 45 percent percent of men. President Obama's re-election was largely credited to women voters who overcame his deficits among men.

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/cafe/women-voters-aren-t-monolithic-terry-mcauliffe-can-thank-black-women-for-his-win

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Arrow 14 replies Author Time Post
Reply 'Women Voters' Aren't Monolithic: Terry McAuliffe Can Thank Black Women For His Win (Original post)
ismnotwasm Nov 2013 OP
Warpy Nov 2013 #1
ismnotwasm Nov 2013 #3
Warpy Nov 2013 #6
raging moderate Nov 2013 #2
TheOther95Percent Nov 2013 #4
MacGregor Nov 2013 #12
Warpy Nov 2013 #7
BainsBane Nov 2013 #5
Warpy Nov 2013 #8
ismnotwasm Nov 2013 #9
BainsBane Nov 2013 #10
David Zephyr Nov 2013 #11
ismnotwasm Nov 2013 #14
AverageJoe90 Nov 2013 #13

Response to ismnotwasm (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 05:43 PM

1. He can also thank the ones who voted for him and then lied about it to their husbands

and everybody they know after getting their marching orders from some fundy minister.

But no, most women in that situation don't risk the fiery pit for disobeying gawd and voting for a Democrat instead of for some fundamentalist crazy who gets off on rape by proxy via an ultrasound dildo.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #1)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 06:24 PM

3. That's so sad I don't know where to start

At least they voted.

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #3)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 07:20 PM

6. I know

and the saddest part is that some will confess and be "churched," held up as a source of shame in front of the entire congregation.

It's one of the absolute worst aspects of modern (and some old time) religion.

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Response to ismnotwasm (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 05:46 PM

2. Which Virginia towns are NOT white supremacy havens?

It looks as if my husband and I will be moving next year to Virginia from Northern Illinois, to be near children and grandchildren. That's if we can unload our old half-paid house. We kind of need a little town. Obviously we can't live in their rich Arlington neighborhood (well, it looks rich to me). And if we wind up in one of these deep-red all-white towns, we may have bad things happening to us. Are there inexpensive places with lots of black people and sane white people?

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Response to raging moderate (Reply #2)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 06:29 PM

4. Norfolk or Hampton Roads or Charlottesville Areas

Of course, I'm in NYC so the real estate prices look inexpensive from my vantage point. Houses here usually start around $500K and that's for a small house.

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Response to TheOther95Percent (Reply #4)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 09:30 PM

12. Richmond metro is probably cheaper than any of them.

I mean, sure, it's a deeply unsexy location, but it's affordable, and it's not quite two-stray-blades-of-grass-from-being-totally-paved-over yet. And it being centrally located makes escaping to NoVA, Hampton Roads or Charlottesville for the day pretty easy (barring I-64 or, especially, I-95 shenanigans, of course).

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Response to raging moderate (Reply #2)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 07:27 PM

7. Distances there aren't really that great

so think about Maryland, too. Some places near the city are quite reasonably priced and look like the kind of human rainbow I've always insisted on being part of. I can't speak for anybody's sanity, but the insane ones generally keep their traps shut so it's all good.

You won't find the type of little town you're describing with all the white folks on one side of the freeway and all the black folks on the other until you're considerably south of there, south of Richmond.

Your children will be your best guide of where to live. If you've got a half paid off house in NY, you can probably afford one for cash in parts of southern Maryland and northern Virginia.

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Response to ismnotwasm (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 07:19 PM

5. Ism, you're on a GD tear!

It's great to have your voice in here, but I am wondering how you came to think differently about participating in GD?

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Response to BainsBane (Reply #5)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 07:28 PM

8. Face it, GD can be a mosh pit at times

and some people are afraid of it.

I've always had a hide like a rhino because I cut my political teeth in Boston.

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Response to BainsBane (Reply #5)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 07:41 PM

9. Well, it's a story, I'll make it very short.

I am not by nature polite, although I am by nature altruistic. Go figure. I'm very blunt. I tone it down on-line because I understand how misunderstandings can happen. So I'm very careful. I was a child of the street, and that's like my first language. Now years and an education away, it still resonates with me. So I avoid certain arguments that goes nowhere.

Recent events gave me a decision; to either leave, or increase my participation.

I decided to increase my participation.

I still plan on being polite. (The alternative ain't pretty) I'm still able to find common ground with those who honestly seek it, in fact skilled at it. But I won't be silenced.

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #9)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 08:33 PM

10. Good for you!

Yours is a voice we all can benefit from.

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #9)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 08:43 PM

11. Kudos.

As a "child of the street" myself, I totally get it. It is like my "first language, too". Dumpster diving, surviving without family day after day for years sharpens one's insight and also leaves little regard for the niceties that dress up bullshit.

Post away. I'm reading.

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Response to David Zephyr (Reply #11)

Fri Nov 8, 2013, 04:00 AM

14. +1

If you haven't been there,it's hard to explain, thank you

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Response to ismnotwasm (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2013, 09:34 PM

13. AA & Latino ladies do, in fact, deserve a LOT of credit for Terry Mac's win.

 

Good post, Ism. Even if Obenshame manages to hang on to his ill-deserved post, the Repubs are probably all shaking their heads in disgust or swearing in anger tonight.....

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