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Sun Nov 24, 2013, 09:36 AM

 

My employer-based health insurance rates

Anthem Blue Cross POS - Employee + 1 (wife)

Per Month Total - $1725.04

Employer - $1273.24
I pay - $451.80


These rates hurt both the employer and employee.
Employer-based insurance is hurting our economy big time.

ON EDIT: This premium is at approximately 37.5% of my gross pay. Outrageous. How much would single-payer cost?


And here is more:

Anthem Blue Cross POS - Employee + 2 or more

Per Month Total - $2464.33

Employer - $1642.89
Employee - $821.45


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30 replies, 2494 views

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Arrow 30 replies Author Time Post
Reply My employer-based health insurance rates (Original post)
SHRED Nov 2013 OP
MANative Nov 2013 #1
SoCalDem Nov 2013 #2
cilla4progress Nov 2013 #3
SoCalDem Nov 2013 #5
PeaceNikki Nov 2013 #4
Warren Stupidity Nov 2013 #7
PeaceNikki Nov 2013 #8
Lex Nov 2013 #6
mzteris Nov 2013 #9
SHRED Nov 2013 #13
mzteris Dec 2013 #23
SHRED Dec 2013 #25
mzteris Dec 2013 #26
SHRED Dec 2013 #27
mzteris Dec 2013 #28
edhopper Nov 2013 #10
Yo_Mama Nov 2013 #11
SHRED Nov 2013 #12
Yo_Mama Nov 2013 #17
SHRED Nov 2013 #18
Sunlei Nov 2013 #14
SHRED Nov 2013 #15
tavalon Nov 2013 #16
INdemo Nov 2013 #19
SHRED Nov 2013 #20
INdemo Nov 2013 #22
Rosa Luxemburg Nov 2013 #21
Tuesday Afternoon Dec 2013 #24
Loudly Dec 2013 #29
dchill Dec 2013 #30

Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 09:56 AM

1. For United Healthcare Silver, through hubby's employer...

PPO model - Employee + spouse

Monthly total: 840.91

Employer Contribution: 583.08

Employee Contribution: 257.83

Roughly 25% of salary, for insurance that still leaves us with a $1500 deductible and 20% co-insurance on just about everything. Single payer is the only way to go.

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 10:15 AM

2. The un-affordability of healthcare is costing EVERYONE

Not all that many years ago, BEFORE the HMO was "born" (and along with it, the rise of the mega-insurance companies & the hospital corporations) , some of all of that money would have been in the employee pay envelope.....not in an insurance CEO's Cayman bank account.


Stop and think about all the things that came along at roughly the same time:


HMO coverage at specified facilities instead of the family doctor
401-k
union busting
defined benefit pensions swapped for defined contribution, and then ended
credit cards instead of raises

All of these things started really ramping up from the 80's to the present , and the wages these things stole from employees have been flushed from the main street economies.

Had we removed employer-medical coverage back when we should have, I suspect that medical care would not be as expensive, and we would have had single payer/universal/nationalized health care ages ago...


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Response to SoCalDem (Reply #2)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 10:48 AM

3. Reading Thom Hartmann's new book

The Crash of 2016. Really lays all this out..and at the feet of "Saint Ronald."

Before he slashed top income tax rates, everything was balanced and far more equitable.

That single fact started this downhill trajectory.

I wonder if it can be stopped? At least we (the bottom 99%) still have the numbers. One would think in a democratic electoral system, we could vote in higher income tax rates? I think that's what we were all hoping for with Pres Obama. Damn Congress.

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Response to cilla4progress (Reply #3)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 11:23 AM

5. I heard Thom once on the radio, telling about how the Boomer generation

is going to participate the the largest transfer of wealth in human history...

NOT to their heirs, but to the healthcare INDUSTRY..


unless we "take responsibility" and refuse to play their game..

A dear friend of ours recently died and he got all the family together and flat-out told them he wanted NO FUNERAL..NO MEMORIAL (except for the immediate family) and showed them his paperwork demanding no "heroic" efforts.

He stopped chemo when it was obvious he would not "win" his war. He was medicated to prevent as mush pain as possible, and he participated in life as long as he could.. We saw them out socially 4 days before he died.

He wanted to die at home with his family..and he did

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 10:51 AM

4. This is why I do NOT understand why corporate America (save insurance companies) is not 100% behind

single payer.

Those numbers do not factor in all of the administrative work that employers have to pay for HR people to shop for and manage these plans.

I just don't get it.

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Response to PeaceNikki (Reply #4)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 11:34 AM

7. It is a really good question.

 

Of course the health insurance industry and big pharma are opposed, but every other corporate sector should be lobbying for single payer Medicare for all.

The answer is that they understand class loyalty, they always have.

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Response to Warren Stupidity (Reply #7)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 11:36 AM

8. I guess another reason is that it's a way to have the upper hand with employees

when health insurance is tied to employment, it makes it that much harder for the employee to leave.

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 11:29 AM

6. Nothing would boost the economy more than fixing the healthcare system.

Imagine all the things employers could be doing if there weren't these criminally high costs to pay to insurance companies. Practically extortion.


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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 11:37 AM

9. You have a crappy agent.

Or someone's getting a very nice kickback

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Response to mzteris (Reply #9)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 12:00 PM

13. my employer has a small and expensive pool

 


I work in the public sector for a city of 50,000.

We have approximately 85 employees in Anthem and 35 in Kaiser.
Last year at least 8 Anthem members had multi-thousand/million dollar care treatments as in cancer and other things.

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Response to SHRED (Reply #13)

Sun Dec 1, 2013, 11:40 AM

23. Why is it split?

Between Anthem and Kaiser? Is there a reason? Generally speaking, one company with the whole loaf will give you a better price than two with part of a loaf.

And you can pit one against the other. Were their other companies involved in the bidding process? Are there any smaller local co-op type health care associations? Some hospitals/clinics have their own. But it is a smaller city (or large town) so maybe not.

Though it does sound like your group is very high risk. That's not the insurance companies' fault. There has to be a spreading of the risk. That's what groups are for.

It sounds like you would be better off with independent coverage, in fact probably most of you. Except those high risk people of course. That would pretty much leave them out in the cold even with ACA. Unless their medical bills were so high they qualify for subsidies. My suggestion? You all take a look at what ACA gets you.

And I still say you have a crappy agent.

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Response to mzteris (Reply #23)

Sun Dec 1, 2013, 11:52 AM

25. We have two choices: Anthem or Kaiser

 


I think we are getting ripped off.

No worries for me though because I am getting the heck outta there soon. Retirement! Thanks ACA!!!!

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Response to SHRED (Reply #25)

Sun Dec 1, 2013, 11:58 AM

26. Why? is the question?

Again, one agency who has access to ALL of your employees business will give you a better deal than two companies who will have fewer participants.

Your agent may tell you it's a better price because the "competition" for the individual business, but you're way too small for that. The bidding war should come BEFORE the policy is in place.

Someone - besides the insurance company - is making out like a bandit. Maybe several someones.

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Response to mzteris (Reply #26)

Sun Dec 1, 2013, 12:05 PM

27. I work for a city so it's the public sector

 


I doubt if there are any "kickbacks" going on but who knows.

Good point about the two groups. We have approximately 85 employees in Anthem and 35 in Kaiser. Would those 35 make a big difference if we had only Anthem?

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Response to SHRED (Reply #27)

Sun Dec 1, 2013, 12:37 PM

28. The larger the pool,

the better the deal, because there are more people to spread the risks around.

And if it's public sector, it's probably more likely there are kickbacks - of some sort (jobs, contracts, freebies - it doesn't HAVE to be $$) than in the private!

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 11:43 AM

10. The sad part

is that if corporations were taxed as part of National Healthcare it would probably cost them half as much as they pay now in premiums. But they would fight such a tax tooth and nail because, you know, socialism, taxes, job creators, etc...

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 11:51 AM

11. ACA is the reform - you are entitled to a subsidy on the exchange

The premium exceeds 9.5% of your household income, right? If that's so, then you can go on the exchange and get a premium subsidy.

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Response to Yo_Mama (Reply #11)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 11:56 AM

12. Not in this case

 

My employer covers me 100%.

Dependent coverage expense is not counted in the "affordability" factoring.

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Response to SHRED (Reply #12)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 12:18 PM

17. Oh, shit.

You're right.

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Response to Yo_Mama (Reply #17)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 12:24 PM

18. My coworker makes less than me

 

He has a wife and two kids on his plan... Over 800 dollars per month. Criminal.

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 12:05 PM

14. I bet if you told your employer to give you the 1700 a month, he would say no.

think employers get perks from insurance co like free insurance for them and a type of life insurance on all employees that employer/insurance co collect on if employee dies.

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Response to Sunlei (Reply #14)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 12:08 PM

15. I work in the public sector

 

Last edited Sun Nov 24, 2013, 01:14 PM - Edit history (1)

It's the tax payers who are getting ripped off.


ON EDIT: I just figured it... His total premium costs for him and his family come out to 65% of his pay. He pays 21% and the city pays the remaining 44%.

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 12:09 PM

16. I'm with you

I think my employer is proud of how much they contribute to my insurance. And yet, I paid $5000 out of an empty pocket this last year.

Single Payer. Single Payer. Single Payer.

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 12:37 PM

19. I honestly dont see where you came up with these figures

I question the validity $2664.00+? ..I jut don't believe this is accurate

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Response to INdemo (Reply #19)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 12:54 PM

20. Well here is a screenshot for ya (city blanked out for privacy):

 

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Response to SHRED (Reply #20)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 02:03 PM

22. Sorry...I thought you meant this premium was what

you found as part of the affordable care act. Still for group insurance this seems high when just for fairly low copays my wife get individual coverage through BC BS for 525.00 per month..

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Nov 24, 2013, 01:06 PM

21. In the UK you would contribute less than this through taxes

Tax breakdown for 25,500 salary (approx. $40,000)
2,080 Pensions and Benefits
(including 212 on Housing Benefit and 296 on Incapacity Benefits)
1,094 on the NHS
824 on Education
339 on Defence
160 on the Police
44 on Prisons
92 on Roads
71 on Railways

just 1094 a year for health! (S1770 per year)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-16744819

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Dec 1, 2013, 11:50 AM

24. I can not get a co-pay for my monthly Rx until I get to the Silver Plan offered by my Employer.

I can not afford the Silver Plan. I have two Rx that I take daily. Ugh.

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Dec 1, 2013, 12:59 PM

29. Compare to Medicare.

 

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Response to SHRED (Original post)

Sun Dec 1, 2013, 01:35 PM

30. K & R.

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