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Mon Dec 9, 2013, 07:37 AM

Echoes of Enterprise

Back in those days everything was simpler and more confused
One summer night, going to the pier
I ran into two young girls
The blonde one was called Freedom
The dark one, Enterprise
We talked and they told me this story
Now listen to this...
I'll tell you about Texas radio and the big beat
-- The Doors; "Stoned Immaculate"

My brother called to tell me about a lecture he heard at the university he works at on the West Coast. The woman who presented on the environmental crisis that the world now faces was inspirational, but like many good people, my brother feels overwhelmed by the ultimate size of the problems we face -- including a corporate "shadow government" that is invested in ignoring the addiction to fossil fuels. And a corporate media that serves daily doses of narcotic nonsense, which dulls the senses of the public, and prevents them from grasping the certain pain and suffering that awaits just around the bend.

Ike issued the famous warning about the military-industrial complex, of course. Much of the public recognized this was a significant warning, but too many valued the statement, more than its implications. Since the end of WW2, the USA had become the most powerful nation on the planet, and the new middle class experience proved comfortable. Yet, by the time JFK took office as a new leader born in the new century, an older form of power-elite had become entrenched in the shadows of democracy.

That group, called the "High Cabal" by Churchill, and the "invisible power structure" by R. B. Fuller, had a governing philosophy based upon four social theories. Prouty notes that these include: [1] "real property," defined by the doctrine of discovery and the rights of conquest; [2] Malthus's population theory, in which humans reproduction is geometric, while resources reproduce at an arethmatic rate, before dwindling; [3] social Darwinism; and [4] Heisenburg's theory of undeterminant synergism.

In this context, Dallas wasn't a coup; it was a re-alignment of power. Likewise for the response to Watergate, in which the congressional actions were merely the visible part of a much larger iceberg. Lamar Waldron's series of three books (the first two written with Thom Hartman) document the "invisible power structure's" on-going re-alignment throughout the 1960s and '70s. (See "Ultimate Sacrifice," "Legacy of Secrecy," & "Watergate: The Hidden History."

The Reagan-Bush administration demonstrated that corruption alone did not disqualify those fronting for the machine from holding the reins of power. In fact, the Reaganites were more criminal than the Nixon gang, and did more institutional damage to our form of federal government. But the elite prospered: as David Stockman would later admit, "Reaganomics" was a lie intended to redistribute the country's wealth towards the top.

Based largely upon MIT's Jay W. Forrestor's theory of "systems' dynamics," the Reagan-Bush administrations recognized that US resources were dwindling. The example of steel shows how domestic industry was undercut, damaging the entire national economy. Yet the powerful elite became even more entrenched in a modern, updated feudal system.

This required their joining forces with the elites of other nations. This is best illustrated by its impact on US foreign policy: the Reaganites created an entity they called "the Enterprise," which ran the series of criminal activities known as the Iran-Contra scandal. A proper understanding of this "invisible government" activity includes not only a foreign policy that ignored the constitutional system, but which violated the very concepts upon which this nation was formed. It planted the seeds for Wall Street and banking "crises," which continue to undermine our society today.

The power elite's goal is not to avoid global crises, it is to prepare the 1% to survive these crises. Hence, Stockman's comments that the actual purpose of Reaganomics was to build the nation's military capabilities, while destroying the social programs that intended to benefit the masses. Often, this economic theology includes the delusional belief system voiced by James Watt, regarding not knowing how many generations were to preceed the "Second Coming."

One can debate which, if any, US President has challenged the power elite since JFK. What is beyond debate is that this tiny group has continued to increase in fortune, while the majority of citizens have endured a cold and harsh economic reality. More, our system of government has become the Jerry Springer Show. The few rational voices in DC are ignored by a media that provides a grand platform for the outrageous histrionics of jackasses unfit to hold office.

No one person, or single group, has "the" answer to the crises we face. However, in my opinion, every individual and group should focus upon the Constitution for a framework of how government can best work. More, we should study the ideas and activitiies of those who have challenged the machine in the past -- people like Martin Luther King, Jr., for example. We need to divest our investments in McAmerica. We need to stop being unconscious and unwitting participants in the destruction of the living environment, which includes humanity.

I can tell you this: no eternal reward will forgive us for wasting the opportunities of Now.

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Arrow 25 replies Author Time Post
Reply Echoes of Enterprise (Original post)
H2O Man Dec 2013 OP
annabanana Dec 2013 #1
H2O Man Dec 2013 #10
coeur_de_lion Dec 2013 #2
H2O Man Dec 2013 #12
Octafish Dec 2013 #3
H2O Man Dec 2013 #13
democrank Dec 2013 #4
H2O Man Dec 2013 #14
Zorra Dec 2013 #5
LiberalElite Dec 2013 #11
coeur_de_lion Dec 2013 #24
H2O Man Dec 2013 #15
Warren DeMontague Dec 2013 #6
H2O Man Dec 2013 #16
Warren DeMontague Dec 2013 #18
malaise Dec 2013 #7
H2O Man Dec 2013 #17
malaise Dec 2013 #22
robertpaulsen Dec 2013 #8
H2O Man Dec 2013 #19
robertpaulsen Dec 2013 #25
hootinholler Dec 2013 #9
H2O Man Dec 2013 #20
hootinholler Dec 2013 #23
kentuck Dec 2013 #21

Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Dec 9, 2013, 07:52 AM

1. I was confronted, in my younger days, by an ill

salt water fish tank that I had set up in a flurry of ignorant enthusiasm. I came to regret that choice, and resent the work involved to keep it healthy.

Rather than do the moral thing, de accession the tank and rescue the denizens, I blanked its very existence out of my mind and stubbornly refused to look even into that corner of my small apartment as the water continued to evaporate and the salt continued to concentrate.

This wilful refusal to do the right thing has continued to haunt me even into my senior years.

Paralysis in the face of an unpleasant truth is a bad choice and there is still much that can be done.

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Response to annabanana (Reply #1)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 10:18 PM

10. Well said.

Well said, indeed. You hit the nail on the head. Thank you.

I think we are in that fish tank now. I recently had a meeting with the superintendent of a school district in upstate NY. A decade ago, a building project placed a wing of a primary school right on top of a toxic industrial waste dump site. The dump was one of those pesky, unreported ones that dot the land here.

A few school employees approached me with paperwork that the last superintendent had kept secret. In fact, employees were afraid to report the problems that have resulted. While that type of fear is a stick that I don't feel, I can understand why they were silent. Yet that community's itty-bitty children were exposed to extremely unacceptable levels of poisons.

I know the history of the site, and the new superintendent has a conscience. So we are addressing the issue.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Mon Dec 9, 2013, 06:43 PM

2. I fear you are right as usual H20

And I wonder how far away we are right now from American feudalism. Maybe we are already well into it.

People are actually still buying the notion that Reagan's "trickle down" economics is good for the country. The Republicans see Reagan as a God, the last great Republican President.

Members of my own family continuously vote against their own self interest. The fear is if they don't, the welfare cheaters are going to take away their hard earned money. They don't realize that the wealthy 1% already has.

Our "narcotic nonsense" on Faux News causes otherwise intelligent people to hate anyone but the most rabid republican. Whereas Rush Limbaugh used to only have followers in the radical, crazy bigoted fringe of our society, now I hear him referred to on national news as if what he is saying is the truth.

I do see reason for hope. Barack Obama was elected president twice because record numbers turned out to vote. Obamacare is law.

Some people I know who used to only vote republican voted for Obama because the thought of Rmoney as president was sickening to them.

I don't think the republicans have learned anything from the last election. I think in the next election they will prop up another lunatic candidate who will lose for the same reasons Rmoney did.

So I'm hopeful. But I would still like to know what we can do now to help our current situation.

Suggestions?


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Response to coeur_de_lion (Reply #2)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 09:51 AM

12. Thank you.

Minister Malcolm X taught that if one seeks to change people's behaviors, they must first change people's thinking. The 2008 election was indeed an important event, and offered the possibility of significant change. And some things, such as the Affordable Care Act, have happened.

However, in many other ways, the nation is heading down the same path. Foreign policy is the prime example: the US military continues to be active in on-going conflicts in the Middle East and Africa. The public has little idea to what extent, because the media doesn't report accurately. And members of Congress do not take their responsibility to educate and inform the public seriously.

The "Enterprise" was a multi-national group, that made use of mercenary groups. The Cheneyites continued that with Black Water, etc. As President, Obama has found that he has little control over these types of things. Corporate para-military groups, not tied to nation-states as closely as to business interests, are operating around the globe. And, as I noted in an OP a couple of months ago, domestic groups such as the gas industry are now able to contract with military intelligence to "lobby" poor communities to sign leases for hydrofracking.

Hence, the Constitution has been suspended, in a very real sense. Again, the media doesn't report on this, and the only person in DC who had the guts to inform and attempt to educate the public was the late Senator Robert Byrd, in his 2004 book "Losing America." Byrd was very specific in saying the federal government had been suspended on 9-11, and that the "shadow government" was placed in power.

That "shadow government" concept was first developed under Eisenhower; it was updated under Reagan, by VP Bush and Oliver North. It included plans to bypass the Congress and federal courts, and to put a mix of unelected executive branch officials, military intelligence, and corporate leaders in charge. By no coincidence, Bush and North also devised the Enterprise -- which acted as the government in the 1980s. Iran-Contra was merely the tip of the ice cube, which they got caught doing.

I think that the best thing citizens can do is to exercise their Constitutional rights/muscles. I believe that grass roots activism, which includes informing and educating others, is the first step. When the different groups and individuals engaged in grass roots activism join forces, they can then address issues at the next level -- maybe county, eventually state. And eventually, they will be able to elect good people for Congress, and the presidency.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 01:34 PM

3. The 1-percenters think they'll survive.

Perhaps they will. Frank "The Congo Fixer" Carlucci and Co. are banking on it:



The Really Creepy People Behind the Libertarian-Inspired Billionaire Sea Castles

The stinking rich are planning billion-dollar luxury liners that keep the land-based Americans they've plundered at a safe distance.

AlterNet / By Mark Ames
June 1, 2010

What happens when Americans plunder America and leave it broken, destitute and seething mad? Where do these fabulously wealthy Americans go with their loot, if America isn't a safe, secure, or even desirable place to spend their riches? What if they lose faith in their gated communities, because those plush gated communities are surrounded by millions of pissed-off Americans stripped of their entitlements, and who now want in?

The first such floating castle has been christened the " Utopia"--the South Korean firm Samsung has been contracted to build the $1.1 billion ship, due to be launched in 2013. Already orders are coming in to buy one of the Utopia's 200 or so mansions for sale- -which range in price from about $4 million for the smallest condos to over $26 million for 6,600 square-foot "estates." The largest mansion is a whopping 40,000 square feet, and sells for $160 million.

SNIP...

Both Thiel and Milton Friedman's grandson see democracy as the enemy--last year, Thiel wrote "I no longer believe that freedom and democracy are compatible" at about the same time that Milton Friedman's grandson proclaimed, "Democracy is not the answer." Both published their anti-democracy proclamations in the same billionaire-Koch-family-funded outlet, Cato Unbound, one of the oldest billionaire-fed libertarian welfare dispensaries. Friedman's answer for Thiel's democracy problem is to build offshore libertarian pod-fortresses where the libertarian way rules. It's probably better for everyone if Milton Friedman's grandson and Peter Thiel leave us forever for their libertarian ocean lair--Thiel believes that America went down the tubes ever since it gave women the right to vote, and he was outed as the sponsor of accused felon James O'Keefe's smear videos that brought ACORN to ruin.

SNIP...

While neither Bush nor the Bin Ladens are principals in the Frontier Group, its founding director, Frank Carlucci, is a name they know well, and you should too. Carlucci ran the Carlyle Group as its chairman from 1989 through 2005, right around the time that the wars started going undeniably bad, and floating castles started to look like a viable plan. But Carlucci's past is much weirder and scarier than most of us care to know: whether it's his strangely timed appearances in some of the ugliest assassinations and coups in modern history, or serving as Carter's number two man in the CIA, and Ronald Reagan's Secretary of Defense, if Frank Carlucci (nicknamed "Creepy Carlucci" and "Spooky Frank" is the founding director of a firm that's building floating castles, it's a bad sign for those of us left behind.

I'll get into Carlucci's partners in the Frontier Group in a moment, but first, let's reacquaint ourselves with Frank Carlucci. From an early age, Carlucci learned the importance of getting to know the right people in the right places. He studied at Princeton in the mid-1950s, where as luck should have it, Carlucci roomed with Donald Rumsfeld. Both Carlucci and Rumsfeld shared a passion for Greco-Roman wrestling at Princeton, and both went on to serve in the Navy after Princeton. Their paths would split and merge several times over the next few decades, even as they remained close personal friends throughout their lives. In the late 1950s, Carlucci briefly served as an executive at a lingerie manufacturer, Jantzen (the Victoria's Secret of its day), but quickly left to join the State Department.

CONTINUED...

http://www.alternet.org/story/147058/the_really_creepy_people_behind_the_libertarian-inspired_billionaire_sea_castles



Outstanding essay, yours. Thank you for sharing, H20 Man!

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Response to Octafish (Reply #3)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 02:20 PM

13. Carlucci's role

reminds me, in a way, of James Baker's -- usually those who run the machine do not "lower" themselves by serving in government. And those who do cross that line tend to do it in the manner of those fellows: not as candidates who compete in elections, but rather as unelected advisors/agency heads.

That is distinct from the revolving door that allows elected officials to enter the corporate world in cushy positions, frequently to lobby with their former buddies in Congress. Both, of course, are cancerous growths on a democracy.

I'm glad that you enjoyed my essay.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 05:30 PM

4. Thanks for posting this, H20Man.

As far as U.S. presidents challenging the power elite since JFK....too much machine, too little challenge.

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Response to democrank (Reply #4)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 02:24 PM

14. Right.

I think that Jimmy Carter intended to, to a certain degree. But he mistook the Washington "elite" crowd for the actual powerful elite. His intial attempt to install Ted S as head of the CIA might have reinforced that error in perception, although I am obviously speculating on how President Carter understood the opposition.

Thank you for reading and responding to my OP. I appreciate it.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 06:58 PM

5. Great post, thanks ~ but...IMO, in this country, where watching "Duck Dynasty" and other inane

reality television culture/mind control devices are the most important events of the week in the lives of about one half of this nation's population, most of whom have been trained since birth to think and act against their own interests in many aspects of their lives, we will need to find a way to persuade them to go along with the necessary changes.

The sad fact is that the majority of Americans are irrevocably brainwashed by capitalist marketing (economic, religious, social, political, all of the above) of some form or another, and will not willingly give up their Big Macs, Cokes, Marlboros, big screens, and Dodge Rams even if it is indisputably clear that these things are definitely going to kill them, and everything else on the planet, and the planet itself, within 5 years of right now.

I believe the preservation of this planet will necessarily fall to a relatively small, extremely committed and dedicated, highly conscious collective of like minded, altruistic people, who are willing to take chances and make hard choices with a focused radical non-violent agenda. The only solution is world revolution, in so many areas of existence.



You're working for capitalism. Is capitalism working for you?






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Response to Zorra (Reply #5)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 10:23 PM

11. Margaret Mead quote:

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.

Margaret Mead


Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/m/margaretme100502.html#rWKdsicDb7Z4JCEL.99

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Response to LiberalElite (Reply #11)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 11:12 PM

24. yes! n/t

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Response to Zorra (Reply #5)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 02:30 PM

15. I agree 100%

I'm amazed that people watch that type of shit. It's curious -- I stopped at a farm/feed store this afternoon, and it had a display of what I assume were t-shirts etc featuring stuff from that program. (And, as we know, there are and have been equally shallow shows that enjoy some degree of undeserved popularity.)

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 07:42 PM

6. Down the road to Massachusetts, driving through the night

...I thought I saw Jack Kennedy hitchhiking by a light
I hit the brakes - backed up slow, and Kennedy got in
I said, "It's nice to see you lookin' back in shape again

Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe they gunned you down"
He just shook his head and looked off sadly with a frown
Said, "bullets are like waves, they only rearrange the sand
History turns upon the tides and not the deeds of man"


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Response to Warren DeMontague (Reply #6)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 02:30 PM

16. Very good!

Thank you!

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #16)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 03:21 PM

18. :)

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 07:59 PM

7. Excellent post

Long time no see Waterman

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Response to malaise (Reply #7)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 02:35 PM

17. Thanks!

I haven't been on here much recently, as I'm going through one of the worst periods in my life. Not the least of which was yet another surgery a week ago. Luckily, I was strong, stubborn, and/or stupid enough to leave the hospital "against medical advice" about an hour after I woke up. (grin) So it looks like DU will be stuck with me for a while.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #17)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 07:03 PM

22. Please get well soon bro

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 08:37 PM

8. Great post, H2O Man! Really gives the full late 20th century scope of our descent.

I hadn't heard the term 'The Enterprise' to describe the largely illegal Reagan foreign policy; would that also take into account some domestic plans like Rex 84? It never fails to amaze me how each succeeding Republican administration is measures worse than what came before. Nixon is practically left-wing compared with any Tea Bag pretender to the throne.

There's so much food for thought here, as your posts usually contain, that I wanted to discuss one minor aspect first. I'm curious how our opinions coincide or differ on the subject of the book Ultimate Sacrifice. What did you think of this book in its totality? Personally, I had mixed feelings. I thought they did a fantastic job documenting the role the Mafia had in the assassination of JFK. But I felt they really let the CIA off the hook; it came off as a "Wag the Dog" explanation where the Mob was pulling the strings of CIA officers like David Sanchez Morales. I haven't read Legacy of Secrecy or Watergate: The Hidden History, so my somewhat lukewarm opinion is limited to the first book. I just felt compared with a book like JFK and the Unspeakable, Ultimate Sacrifice kind of undercut the true legacy of JFK rather than bolstering it.

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Response to robertpaulsen (Reply #8)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 03:35 PM

19. Right.

The first book did focus a great deal on the mafia. More, it made it appear that the "mafia" was distinct from certain elected officials in Washington, and government agencies, including the CIA. So I agree with you that this was a major short-coming in that book.

Both the second and third were made possible because of more and more documents being made available to researchers. (Luckily, that allows us to discuss this in the context of research in investigations, keeping this discussion from being referred to as "conspiracy theory."

One of the obvious problems with the Warren Commission is that two agencies -- the FBI and CIA -- failed to share information with the commission's investigators. This is a well-established fact. And any investigation can only be as good as the information available.

While I strongly disagree with Vincent Bugliosi's book on Dallas and the Warren Commission, I respect that it was well-researched. Yet, much of the information reported on in the three books we are discussing was not available to Bugliosi. Hence, while he disagrees with the authors, even he has said that these books are informative, important, and are not "conspiracy theories."

One of the things I believe is most important, and which rarely is reported upon, involves the ONI. By no coincidence, some of the major figures from both the first two books (Dallas) and the third (Watergate) are men who were officially in either the FBI or CIA. But, upon closer examination, they were actually from ONI, serving "on loan" as shared staff -- not uncommon, but definitely significant. Most journalists, like the general public, assume that "intelligence agency" equals CIA. Even here on DU, very few people understand the distinctions.

One of the things that the authors have learned is that ONI did its own investigation of Dallas. The study's conclusion is very different from that of the Warren Commission. The report, of course, will never be released to the nation.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #19)

Thu Dec 12, 2013, 04:42 PM

25. Those are important distinctions to make.

Important distinctions regarding both intelligence and conspiracies. In the context of research in investigations, it is important for the practitioner, like a good scientist, to test their hypothesis against the larger pattern of facts. I think Jamey Hecht wrote a great essay where he differentiated between hypothesis and theory where conspiracy is concerned and gave high praise to practitioners who engage in the rigorous standards of a scientist when investigating political conspiracy. It's a shame that far too many engage in what I call "conspiratainment"; treating rumors and untested conspiracy hypotheses as highly probable for the sake of entertainment. This is part of why the word "theory" has become so debased in our society.

The other part of why the word "theory" has become so debased in our society concerns the power elite. It seems to me that the more deeply a theory threatens the way certain powerful institutions in society operate, the more controversial that theory is made to appear. Just ask Galileo or Copernicus. Why is it that gravity and relativity are accepted as reality, yet evolution and the greenhouse effect are a source of controversy? All four concepts are scientific theories. As it goes with scientific theories, it goes to an even greater degree for conspiracy theories. After all, the academic study of conspiracy theory hasn't exactly been embraced by institutions of higher learning to the same degree the study of scientific theory has. If anyone offers a Doctorate in Political Conspiracy Theory, I'm not aware of it. Lacking that legitimacy, it is a field of study that is easy to debase because so many practitioners fail to apply the same rigorous standards that a scientist does when testing a hypothesis.

Where the assassination of JFK is concerned, you are quite correct and it is an excellent point to make that there were some major figures (Guy Banister in particular jumps out to me) who were on loan from ONI. What I didn't know was that ONI conducted their own Dallas investigation with a different conclusion. Why has this report not been released and who is responsible for repressing it? I'm wondering if this might dovetail with my own little investigation. I've been researching the rarely reported role that the DIA might have played, taking into account the relationship Allen Dulles had with some key figures there, as well as the hidden history the DIA has had with Operation Gladio. When the DIA was created in the aftermath of the Bay of Pigs fiasco in 1961, one of their chief objectives was to coordinate all US Military Intelligence activities, including ONI. It would be extremely intriguing, to say the least, if the DIA played any part in the suppression of the ONI report on the JFK assassination.

Great talking to you again, H2O Man! I hope you recover from your surgery soon. Take care.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Tue Dec 10, 2013, 09:32 PM

9. It's great to read you

I trust you are well.

Personally, I'm not convinced that what we observed in those cases were a shift in power as much as a change of color ala a chameleon, or a serpent shed.

I do believe you have the core of it correct.

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Response to hootinholler (Reply #9)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 05:39 PM

20. Thank you!

Though I'm not well now, I plan to be again, soon.

There are often conflicts between "new" and "old" wealth/power; there are at times conflicts between the young lions and the old fucks, too. That can account for some of the changing colors, from time to time.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #20)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 08:04 PM

23. Sorry to hear that

If there's anything I can do to aid in Rocky's revival, don't hesitate.

So to change the subject a little, well a lot actually, are we seeing the beginning of the demise of the corporate wing of the party?

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Wed Dec 11, 2013, 05:47 PM

21. Great post!

As usual.

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