HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Chief Bigfoot's Band was ...

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 10:20 AM

Chief Bigfoot's Band was intercepted by the 7th Calvary on this day in 1890

?

After the murder of Tantanka Iyotake (Sitting Bull) and after eluding Custer's old unit, the 7th Calvary, for 12 days a band of Minniconjou Lakota, led by Spotted Elk ( Chief Bigfoot) was intercepted along the western rim of Porcupine Creek on this day in 1890. They were escorted to and camped in a hollow a few miles south near the creek called Wounded Knee.
In the early morning hours on December 29th, 1890, the men
were assembled in a semi-circle formation in front of the tipis
and disarmed.
Yellow Bird, a holy man fearing for the lives of his people stood up and beseeched the Creator and asked for protection.
A shot rang out and the soldiers fired en masse into the sitting
Lakota men, killing most of them instantly. The horror was only
beginning.
The women and children ran as the soldiers chased them
down and killed them one by one. The slaughter continued
for over three hours. Some of the dead were found over three miles
from the campsite.
In vol.3, issue 1, "The Lakota Journal" listed the names of the Lakota
victims of the massacre at Wounded Knee. Four-hundred and five were listed as killed. Of this number, 69 were identified as infants or young children, 133 were identified as women, the remaining 203 were identified as men or had no gender or age identification. Of the total dead, 39 were identified as elders.
The bodies were left to freeze onto the prairie. Over the next three
days survivors and relatives recovered nearly half of the dead. On
the third day a government burial detail arrived to bury the remaining
victims. The bodies were stripped of valuables and dropped into a
mass grave.
A 40 year old, named Last Man, lay gutshot, frozen
to the ground until he was discovered on the 5th of January, 8 days
after the slaughter of December 29th. Last Man died at 8am on
January 6th, 1891.
The United States government awarded 23 Medals of Honor to
members of the Seventh Calvary for their service to the nation at this
place, the creek called Wounded Knee. 45).
Chief Bigfoot's body was scalped and the trophy was sent to
the Seventh Cavalry's museum in Massachusetts. There it remained
over the protests of Chief Bigfoot's family until the summer of 2000.
The last remains of Chief Bigfoot were returned to the place of his
birth, 109 years after his murder.


"I did not know then how much had ended. When I look back
from this high hill of my old age I can still see the butchered
women and children lying heaped and scattered all along the
crooked gulch as plain as when I saw them with eyes still young.
And I can see that something else died there in the bloody mud
and was buried in the blizzard. A peoples dream died there. It
was a beautiful dream....the nation's hoop is broken and scattered.
There is no center any longer and the sacred tree is dead."

BLACK ELK
-Lakota-

http://www.brotherhooddays.com/woundedknee.html

?

Lost Bird was seven months old on December 29th, 1890, the day her mother was shot down at Cankpi Opi Wakpala, the creek called Wounded Knee. Four days after the massacre, Lost Bird was discovered under the frozen body of her mother by General Leonard Colby. Colby took the child for his own and raised Lost Bird in White society. Lost Bird suffered greatly during her life, searching for her identity, subjected to sexual abuse by an adopted cousin and raped and impregnated by Colby, her adoptive father.
She led a tragic life and died on Valentine's Day, 1919, in California. Lost Bird's remains were repatriated to the Wounded Knee Cemetery in 1991. Her life remains a powerful symbol and has become a rallying point for Native People attempting to re-connect to their culture and families the thousands of Native children and their descendants that were removed from their culture and adopted into non-Indian society.

http://www.brotherhooddays.com/lost_bird.htm

49 replies, 10237 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 49 replies Author Time Post
Reply Chief Bigfoot's Band was intercepted by the 7th Calvary on this day in 1890 (Original post)
mikekohr Dec 2013 OP
intaglio Dec 2013 #1
edhopper Dec 2013 #2
kdmorris Dec 2013 #3
jwirr Dec 2013 #8
kdmorris Dec 2013 #11
mikekohr Dec 2013 #49
panader0 Dec 2013 #4
tblue Dec 2013 #26
dipsydoodle Dec 2013 #5
riverwalker Dec 2013 #6
niyad Dec 2013 #20
tblue Dec 2013 #27
jwirr Dec 2013 #7
Berlum Dec 2013 #9
newfie11 Dec 2013 #10
niyad Dec 2013 #12
nilesobek Dec 2013 #13
niyad Dec 2013 #22
CountAllVotes Dec 2013 #14
mikekohr Dec 2013 #16
CountAllVotes Dec 2013 #17
newfie11 Dec 2013 #31
niyad Dec 2013 #24
newfie11 Dec 2013 #32
jwirr Dec 2013 #46
DLevine Dec 2013 #15
JEB Dec 2013 #18
mikekohr Dec 2013 #19
nilesobek Dec 2013 #36
WinkyDink Dec 2013 #21
Generic Other Dec 2013 #23
dipsydoodle Dec 2013 #25
OmahaBlueDog Dec 2013 #28
heaven05 Dec 2013 #29
mikekohr Dec 2013 #35
hfojvt Dec 2013 #38
mikekohr Dec 2013 #39
heaven05 Dec 2013 #43
jwirr Dec 2013 #44
jwirr Dec 2013 #45
mikekohr Dec 2013 #48
hfojvt Dec 2013 #30
Generic Other Dec 2013 #33
mikekohr Dec 2013 #34
hfojvt Dec 2013 #37
mikekohr Dec 2013 #41
Tierra_y_Libertad Dec 2013 #40
mikekohr Dec 2013 #42
RobertEarl Dec 2013 #47

Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 10:23 AM

1. K&R n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 10:30 AM

2. Murka!

Best country ever! Shining light on the hill! Exceptionally exceptional! Blah, blah blah!


We have to remember these horrible acts and realize we are not as good as many think we are.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 10:32 AM

3. Such a devastating travesty...

It's a shame that so few Americans of European descent remember our own past where massacres are concerned (not necessarily DUers, but the population in general)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kdmorris (Reply #3)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 11:00 AM

8. The living back then knew from their own newspapers. But this subject has been buried even deeper

than our past regarding slavery.

It is not a matter of memory. It is a matter of education. We do not teach the things in history we want to forget. But they are exactly what we should be teaching. Our nation is not an object to be worshiped as a perfect creation. It is a evolving system that we should be learning from in order to build a more perfected system.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jwirr (Reply #8)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 11:21 AM

11. Good point

Perhaps "remember" isn't the best word. I just get so irritated when people do nothing to educate themselves on matters of history and then have an opinion that is so ignorant of what has happened in the world. So many times, before the 2003 invasion of Iraq, I heard people around me say that we HAD to do it because Hussein was a dictator that massacred people. But then, when you ask if that then means that Andrew Jackson should also have been overthrown (by the British, maybe, since the Native Americans would have been better off with the British than the nascent American government), they really don't know what you are talking about.

I grew up in the same school systems and learned the same bullshit about how we are so great. I celebrated Columbus Day and then grew up and learned that none of it was true. Christopher Columbus was an awful, evil guy who tortured and decimated the native population of Hispaniola. He wasn't some noble, great dude that found the "greatest country in the world".

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kdmorris (Reply #11)

Tue Dec 31, 2013, 08:21 AM

49. Columbus awarded, and his men prefered girls between the ages of 9-10

-clip- Other Taino People were levied taxes of food, cotton, and forced sex. Columbus would casually note in his journals that young girls of the ages 9 to 10 were the most desired by his men. 1) A story recorded by Michele de Cuneo is frightening proof of this abomination. After Columbus and his men fought a battle on Santa Cruz with a small band of Native People, Columbus presented Michele de Cuneo with a captured Taino girl that de Cuneo described as, "....most beautiful." The young maiden was taken by de Cuneo to his cabin where the young woman defended herself so fiercely that de Cuneo wrote, "...I wished I had never started. But to tell you the end of it, I seized a rope and beat her well. She cried out in such a way that you would not believe it! Finally we reached an agreement...." -end of clip

http://www.brotherhooddays.com/HEROES.html#Christopher Columbus

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 10:42 AM

4. 23 medals of "honor"?

Never forget Wounded Knee, or the shameful treatment of Native Americans by our society.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to panader0 (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:52 PM

26. This country was founded in bloodshed

Why would God bless it at all ever?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 10:44 AM

5. Upsets me just reading this.

Medals of Honour.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 10:45 AM

6. The Ghost Dance


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to riverwalker (Reply #6)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:28 PM

20. all of you who have not yet seen this video, please watch it. so horrible, so sad. the savagery

of the american military is nothing new, alas (see sand creek massacre, for one).

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to riverwalker (Reply #6)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:59 PM

27. Robbie Robertson:



I love this song.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 10:49 AM

7. Which just goes to show how much a medal of honor is worth. Absolutely nothing unless the actions

it represents are honorable. These medals to the 7th are symbols of dishonor.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 11:04 AM

9. Bury my heart at Wounded Knee

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 11:04 AM

10. Thanks for posting this

I've been there many times and it is always a very sad reminder of our country then and the atrocities even now.

My Lakota friend have many stories of crime and corruption through the years.

The children taken from their homes for school, hair cut, and not seeing parents for the school year. That also includes a foreign religion forced on them.

The treaties that were not upheld, crime against the Lakota by politicians.

Even now. When Dashel was running years ago and very popular on the Rez, there were shenanigans.
White people taking pictures of people, cars & license plates at polling places.
The word spred and many many did not vote because of this. He lost.

One note most folks do not know is Chavez gave free heating oil to Cheyenne River Rez, I don't know about others.

Now that he is passed away I don't know if that's still going on.


Edit: this cemetery is owned by a white man and is for sale. Of course the price is out of reach for Pine Ridge Rez.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 11:25 AM

12. the sand creek massacre--29 nov 1864

. . . .

Attack

Black Kettle, a chief of a group of around 800 mostly Northern Cheyenne, reported to Fort Lyon in an effort to establish peace. After having done so, he and his band, along with some Arapaho under Chief Niwot, camped out at nearby Sand Creek, less than 40 miles north. The Dog Soldiers, who had been responsible for many of the raids on whites, were not part of this encampment. Assured by the U.S. Government's promises of peace, most of the warriors were off hunting buffalo, leaving only around 60 men, and women and children in the village. Most of the men were too old or too young to hunt. Black Kettle flew an American flag over his lodge, since previously the officers had said this would show he was friendly and prevent attack by U.S. soldiers.[17]

Setting out from Fort Lyon, Chivington and his 700 troops of the 1st Colorado Cavalry, 3rd Colorado Cavalry and a company of the 1st Regiment New Mexico Volunteer Cavalry marched to Black Kettle's campsite. James Beckwourth, noted frontiersman, acted as a guide for Chivington.[18] On the night of November 28, soldiers and militia drank heavily and celebrated their anticipated victory.[19] On the morning of November 29, 1864, Chivington ordered his troops to attack. Two officers, Captain Silas Soule and Lieutenant Joseph Cramer, commanding the First Colorado Cavalry companies D and K, respectively, refused to follow Chivington's order and told their men to hold fire.[20]

Other soldiers in Chivington's force, however, immediately attacked the village. Disregarding the American flag, and a white flag that was run up shortly after the soldiers commenced firing, Chivington's soldiers massacred many of its inhabitants.

I saw the bodies of those lying there cut all to pieces, worse mutilated than any I ever saw before; the women cut all to pieces ... With knives; scalped; their brains knocked out; children two or three months old; all ages lying there, from sucking infants up to warriors ... By whom were they mutilated? By the United States troops ...
—- John S. Smith, Congressional Testimony of Mr. John S. Smith, 1865[21]

Fingers and ears were cut off the bodies for the jewelry they carried. The body of White Antelope, lying solitarily in the creek bed, was a prime target. Besides scalping him the soldiers cut off his nose, ears, and testicles-the last for a tobacco pouch ...
—- Stan Hoig[22]

Jis to think of that dog Chivington and his dirty hounds, up thar at Sand Creek. His men shot down squaws, and blew the brains out of little innocent children. You call sich soldiers Christians, do ye? And Indians savages? What der yer 'spose our Heavenly Father, who made both them and us, thinks of these things? I tell you what, I don't like a hostile red skin any more than you do. And when they are hostile, I've fought 'em, hard as any man. But I never yet drew a bead on a squaw or papoose, and I despise the man who would.
—- Kit Carson[23]

Some of the Indians cut horses from the camp's herd and fled up Sand Creek or to a nearby Cheyenne camp on the headwaters of the Smokey Hill River. Others, including trader George Bent, fled upstream and dug holes in the sand beneath the banks of the stream. They were pursued by the troops and fired on, but many survived.[24] Cheyenne warrior Morning Star said that most of the Indian dead were killed by cannon fire, especially those firing from the south bank of the river at the people retreating up the creek.[25]

In testimony before a Congressional committee investigating the massacre, Chivington claimed that as many as 500–600 Indian warriors were killed.[26] Historian Alan Brinkley wrote that 133 Indians were killed, 105 of whom were women and children.[27] White eye-witness John S. Smith reported that 70–80 Indians were killed, including 20–30 warriors,[2] which agrees with Brinkley's figure as to the number of men killed. George Bent, the son of the American William Bent and a Cheyenne mother, who was in the village when the attack came and was wounded by the soldiers, gave two different accounts of the Indian loss. On March 15, 1889, he wrote to Samuel F. Tappan that 137 people were killed: 28 men and 109 women and children.[28] However, on April 30, 1913, when he was very old, he wrote that "about 53 men" and "110 women and children" were killed and many people wounded.[29] Bent's first figures are in close accord with those of Brinkley and agree with Smith as to the number of men who were killed

. . . .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_Creek_massacre

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 11:34 AM

13. After Custer's annihilation

General Miles went on a war of genocide. The natives had to carry their supplies and families with them. General Miles knew how to exploit that. He waited for winter, extremely bitterly cold in Montana and turned his raiders loose with instructions to specifically burn supplies. The jerky and provisions, the hides to keep warm went up in flames in every encampment. You can read stories of women and children wandering the countryside with no clothing or food at -20F. It was and is a war crime.

Terrible, reprehensible and shameful.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to nilesobek (Reply #13)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:34 PM

22. welcome to DU. terrible, reprehensible and shameful, exactly.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 11:57 AM

14. Just yesterday ...

Was speaking with a woman that worked for a drug company I have to deal with. She said she'd gone to So. Dakota about 14 years ago and that she could not believe how racist the Indian people there were.

She said, "Well, I thought all of that hatred and stuff was over with."

I didn't know what to say as the call was being recorded but I felt like telling her that the hatred is justified and how would YOU feel if everyone in your family had been killed?

I didn't say it but sure thought it.

I find it almost amazing to know that there are Americans among us that think that the Indian issue is "over with". It is far from over with and never will be "over with".

Much restitution is deserved to the Native people of this land we call America. The crime of genocide has taken a tremendous toll over the years and it is almost amazing to know that there are still some Indian people alive today. With government policies such as extermination, assimilation and alas, "self-determination" at work one can see how horrific the white man's will has harmed and damaged a people that most certainly never deserved it.

It is all about one word and that is GREED. GREED kills.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CountAllVotes (Reply #14)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:05 PM

16. I've been to Pine Ridge many times. I've never experienced anything but hospitality and friendship

I'm sure there are exceptions to my experience.

https://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/mike.kohr.9/media_set?set=a.1183571711497.2027130.1294363166&type=3?

My son Ryan and Severt Young Bear Junior.
Good friends come in all colors at International Brotherhood Days.




Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #16)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:13 PM

17. I've been to the Black Hills myself

The ugliest racists I encountered were white people. They were hoping the forest would catch on fire and that the Black Hills would burn so they could make a bunch of $$$ working overtime.

Nice folks alright ...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to CountAllVotes (Reply #17)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 03:51 PM

31. I live in the Black Hills and that's news to me

The people you heard don't speak for the majority that love our Black Hills.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #16)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:37 PM

24. that is a beautiful pic, mike, and thank you for sharing.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #16)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 03:59 PM

32. For 15 years I was on a medical mobile unit

I went to Pine Ridge, Rosebud, Eagle Butte, and several other Rez in ND.
I found wonderful people, got to know my patients over the years as well as folks working IHS.
I heard their horror stories from years past and they have over the years been treated horribly.
I was never treated badly and miss my many friends since I retired.
The Lakota People are a warm welcoming people. Proud of their heritage and living with the atrocities their families have endured.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #16)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 05:43 PM

46. I was there in 1970s at the time of the take over then. Even with the terrible events that were

happening I was welcomed and treated well. I also have known many wonderful people on the rez.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 11:58 AM

15. Absolutely horrific.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:14 PM

18. Indeed,

 

"the nation's hoop is broken and scattered.
There is no center any longer and the sacred tree is dead."

BLACK ELK
-Lakota-

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:18 PM

19. General Nelson A Miles Letter regarding Wounded Knee- March 13, 1917

The following is a letter from General Nelson A. Miles to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs in 1917 concerning the Massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890:
Washington, D. C. March 13, 1917
The Honorable Commissioner of Indian Afairs

Sir:

I am informed that there is a delegation in Washington now who came here from... South Dakota and who are representatives of the remnant of what is known as the Big Foot Band of Northern Sioux Indians.

I was in command of that Department in 1889, 1890, and 1891, when what is known as the Messiah craze and threatened uprising of the Indians occurred. It was created by misrepresentations of white men then living in Nevada who sent secret messages to the different tribes in the great Northwest calling upon them to send representatives to meet Him near Walker Lake, Nevada.

This was done, and returning to their different tribes in the Northwest and West, and even in the Southwest, they repeated the false statement to the different tribes that the Messiah had returned to earth and would the next year move East,driving large herds of wild horses, buffalo, elk, deer and antelope, and was going to convert this into an Indian heaven--in other words, the Happy Hunting Grounds.

This, together with the fact that the Indians had been in almost a starving condition in South Dakota, owing to the scarcity of rations and the nonfulfillment of treaties and sacred obligations under which the Government had been placed to the Indians, caused great dissatisfaction, dissension and almost hostility. Believing this superstition, they resolved to gather and go West to meet the Messiah, as they believed it was the fulfillment of their dreams and prayer and the prophecies as had been taught them by the missionaries.

Several thousand warriors assembled in the Bad Lands of South Dakota. During this time the tribe, under Big Foot, moved from their reservation to near the Red Cloud Agency in South Dakota under a flag of truce. They numbered over four hundred souls. They were intercepted by a command under Lt. Col. Whitside, who demanded their surrender, which they complied with, and moved that afternoon some two or three miles and camped where they were directed to do, near the camp of the troops.

During the night Colonel Forsyth joined the command with reinforcements of several troops of the 7th Cavalry. The next morning he deployed his troops around the camp, placed two pieces of artillery in position, and demanded the surrender of the arms from the warriors. This was complied with by the warriors going out from camp and placing the arms on the ground where they were directed. Chief Big Foot, an old man, sick at the time and unable to walk, was taken out of a wagon and laid on the ground.

While this was being done a detachment of soldiers was sent into the camp to search for any arms remaining there, and it was reported that their rudness frightened the women and children. It is also reported that a remark was made by some one of the soldiers that "when we get the arms away from them we can do as we please with them, " indicating that they were to be destroyed. Some of the indians could understand English. this and other things alarmed the Indians and scuffle occured between one warrior who had rifle in his hand and two soldiers. The rifle was discharged and a massacre occurred, not only the warriors but the sick Chief Big Foot, and a large number of women and children who tried to escape by running and scattering over the prarie were hunted down and killed.

The action of the Commanding Officer, in my judgement at the time, and I so reported, was most reprehensible. The disposition of his troops was such that in firing upon the warriors they fired directly towards their own lines and also into the camp of the women and children. and I have regarded the whole affair as most unjustifiable and worthy of the severest condemnation.

In my opinion, the least the Government can do is to make a suitable recompense to the survivors who are still living for the great unjustice that was done them and the serious loss of their relatives and property--and I earnestly recommend that this may be favorably considered by the Department and by Congress and a suitable appropriation be made.

I remain Very truly yours,

(SGD.) NELSON A. MILES

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #19)

Sun Dec 29, 2013, 08:49 PM

36. It seems like the guilt

finally caught up with Miles. How could he write this sensitive letter after all the things he had done? He was the chief field strategist in starving and killing these very natives. Maybe he was just, "following orders?"

Thanks again for the warm welcome from DU. Its great to have an outlet for ideas and feelings even when I don't have a dog in the fight. All I have to do is keep trudging off to work, make it through one more shift...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:30 PM

21. The myth of our nation's greatness and blessed nature yet remains.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:35 PM

23. WARNING: Disturbing photographs



A group portrait of Big Foot’s Miniconjou Lakota band at a Grass Dance on the Cheyenne River, South Dakota, in August 1890. Nearly all these people were killed at Wounded Knee just a few months later.



Wounded Knee encampment.



Hotchkiss guns used at Wounded Knee.



View of the slain body of Chief Big Foot propped up in the snow at Wounded Knee. U.S. soldiers, civilian burial party members, and a “Chunk” or “Stick” Stove of the type used to heat the Conical or Sibley army tent are shown in the background. (The Stick Stove almost certainly marks the location of Big Foot’s tent, which was very close to the council circle. Major Samuel Whitside of the 7th Cavalry ordered a stove placed in Big Foot’s tent on the night before the massacre.)



On December 29, 1890, in a ravine near Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota, the U.S. Army, supported by American Indian mercenaries, slaughtered approximately 300 Lakota men, women and children—75% of Big Foot's Lakota community. They had already surrendered when they were brought to Wounded Knee by the army. The U.S. troops turned their weapons—including 4 rapid-fire Hotchkiss guns—against clearly defeated warriors and innocent women, children and old men.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Generic Other (Reply #23)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 12:43 PM

25. Disturbing indeed

but important they are seen.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 01:10 PM

28. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 01:10 PM

29. Whoa!!!!

 

How sad and vicious. Apple Pie, huh? Eat this pie, 'god bless amerika' crowd.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to heaven05 (Reply #29)

Sun Dec 29, 2013, 07:06 PM

35. "What has happened has happened and can not be changed. We must find a way

to move forward, together."
- Eli Tail- Lakota spiritual leader and veteran, at International Brotherhood Days, 1994

There will always be those that attempt to diminish or dismiss the horror of what happened 123 years ago. There will always be disagreement over who, how and why the first shot was fired. But the three hour long indiscriminate slaughter of women, children and unarmed elders at Canki Opi Wakpala that followed the initial volleys of the soldiers remain one of the darkest moments in a very dark history of relations between the First People of this land and those that took it from them.

And yet in spite of this this history, this shared legacy, we can speak, remember, and commemorate that dark day without fear of reprisals from our government. That means something. That counts for something.

The first step in reconciliation is acknowledgment. Understanding and respect are the next. And never losing sight of of the words of Friedrich Nietzsche:
"Memory says, "I did that." Pride replies, "I could not have done that." Eventually, memory yields," ensures that the deniers among us never carry the day.

In the Spirit of Brotherhood

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #35)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 12:55 PM

38. why is that day darker than these days in August, 1862

"August 23 - About 650 Dakota attack New Ulm. Town is burned; 34 die and 60 are wounded, but the barricaded area holds out.

August 25 - 2,000 New Ulm refugees head for Mankato, thirty miles away."


Looks to me like they certainly TRIED to kill a whole bunch of women and children there. If the town had not been able to defend themself, how many women and children and elders would have died there?

Should we remember THOSE dead every year?




Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hfojvt (Reply #38)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 03:22 PM

39. "If they are hungry let them eat grass or their own dung." Trader Andrew Myrick 1862

remember all who died and the reasons that led the Dakota to attempt to recapture their own land rather than starve to death. Remember that Minnesota newspapers published articles encouraging settlers to leave strychnine poisoned food along Indian trails and hailed the more efficient costs of poison over lead and gunpowder.

Every atrocity committed by Native Americans was committed in retaliation or in a hopeless attempt to defend their land, their culture and existence. Every atrocity committed by Europeans against Native People was committed in the taking of their land.

GENERAL POPE: First commander of the Military Department of the Northwest, and later a Civil War leader in the Union Army:
"It is my purpose to exterminate the Sioux."
Later, after uttering these words, General Pope over-saw the military trial of the Santee-Dakota People, arrested after their desperate attempt to drive out the settlers in southwest Minnesota. The Santee-Dakota were slowing starving to death due to chronic shortages of promised government rations and rampant theft of government commodities by traders and corrupt government officials. After a trader named Andrew Myrick told a council of elders, "So far as I am concerned, if they are hungry let them eat grass or their own dung," 92). the Santee-Dakota rebelled and drove off 1000's of settlers, killing hundreds before their rebellion failed against the weight of General Pope's Army. Of the 392 prisoners tried, 306 were sentenced to death. So gross was the miscarriage of justice in these proceedings that all but 38 of the death sentences were commuted.
http://www.brotherhooddays.com/HEROES.html#GENERAL POPE

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #39)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 05:05 PM

43. It's good to know your own history

 

I applaud your answers to me and the person you're responding too with this answer. In peace.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #39)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 05:25 PM

44. Having done some genealogy in that period of time in the NW Iowa area I will add that it was not

only the MN newspapers that encouraged to murder of Native Americans. I was sickened by what I read.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hfojvt (Reply #38)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 05:28 PM

45. There are a number of memorials regarding the insident all the way from Northern Iowa to the New

Ulm area. They have not been forgotten.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hfojvt (Reply #38)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 09:08 PM

48. War Within War: Lincoln and the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862 .

-clip-
In early 1862 a federal investigator cautioned President Lincoln that mass corruption within Minnesota's system of Indian Agencies would lead to disaster if left unchecked. The president, consumed by the battle to preserve the Union, ignored the warning. When the U.S.-Dakota War broke out eight months later, Lincoln told Minnesota's governor Alexander Ramsey, "Attend to the Indians... Necessity has no law." -end of clip-

view the following lecture video. It's an hour long but it is very insightful:

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 01:58 PM

30. of course, it simply MUST be mis-remembered every year

this account gives a slightly different version, from an eye-witness.

http://www.historynet.com/philip-wells-wounded-at-wounded-knee.htm

"As interpreter Philip Wells listened carefully, the Sioux medicine man's incantations took on a darker tone."

...

"Men leaped to their feet. Younger warriors were throwing off their blankets, bringing their rifles to their shoulders. One brandished his rifle in the air, vowing to keep his gun forever. Another fired into the soldiers."

So, if the soldiers were shot at first, should they NOT return fire? I guess if several hundred cavalry had been killed instead on this day, it would be just as forgotten every year as the Battle at the Little Bighorn or the attack on New Ulm, Minnesota or the River Raisin Massacre.

"When the last gun was silenced on December 29, a hastily set up field hospital doled out initial treatment to 37 wounded soldiers, Father Kraft, Philip Wells and 51 Indians who were too maimed to escape the battlefield."

Wait? What? 51 wounded Indians were captured/rescued? First time I have heard that. According to your account, they were all hunted down and treacherously slaughtered.

And how could I NOT have heard of this hero? Especially considering that that is MY name too!!

"The Reverend Thomas Cook, rector of the Holy Cross Episcopal Mission and himself half Sioux, came on the rest of the shivering but silent huddled Indian wounded much later that evening. Too stunned and fearful to utter a sound, they had been left lying in a horseless wagon — forgotten as more urgent matters took precedence. The horrified pastor took things into his own hands."

So, in this account there were at least 51 Indian survivors that the US Army took care of. In your account, almost all of them were mercilessly hunted down and slaughtered.

Which account is true? Perhaps some combination of both. Some, perhaps more than a few, were hunted down and slaughtered. But, surely, the story of 51 wounded being taken care of could not be a complete fabrication.

And there should be records of THIS, official inquiry as well.

"Colonel Forsyth, subject to two courts of inquiry for his deployment of troops and the deaths of noncombatants, was cleared of deliberate misdeeds and restored to his command. "

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hfojvt (Reply #30)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 06:33 PM

33. A very interesting account of a terrible day

Did you notice that descendents of Philip Wells were the main comments after the article? A reminder how close this history is to living memory. And even so, the details have gotten fuzzy. Thanks for posting this.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hfojvt (Reply #30)

Sat Dec 28, 2013, 08:47 PM

34. 4 of the wounded were Lakota men, the 47 remaining wounded were Lakota women and children

Indeed wounded were removed and treated. But considering the women and children were separated from the men, most of whom were killed in the first few moments, one must be drawn to the obvious conclusion that the women and children were then systematically hunted down and killed.

Was every soldier at Wounded Knee a blood thirsty monster? No, such is human nature, and exactly what one would expect.
See the letter above from the commanding General Nelson A. Miles:

-clip-
While this was being done a detachment of soldiers was sent into the camp to search for any arms remaining there, and it was reported that their rudness frightened the women and children. It is also reported that a remark was made by some one of the soldiers that "when we get the arms away from them we can do as we please with them, " indicating that they were to be destroyed. Some of the indians could understand English. this and other things alarmed the Indians and scuffle occured between one warrior who had rifle in his hand and two soldiers. The rifle was discharged and a massacre occurred, not only the warriors but the sick Chief Big Foot, and a large number of women and children who tried to escape by running and scattering over the prarie were hunted down and killed.

The action of the Commanding Officer, in my judgement at the time, and I so reported, was most reprehensible. The disposition of his troops was such that in firing upon the warriors they fired directly towards their own lines and also into the camp of the women and children. and I have regarded the whole affair as most unjustifiable and worthy of the severest condemnation.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Reply #34)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 12:31 PM

37. but isn't that really the point?

"Was every soldier at Wounded Knee a blood-thirsty monster?"

The point of this story, the way you tell it, seems to be to say "MANY of them were" and to point an accusing finger at the WHOLE United States of America.

It seems kind of odd, to read what Miles says, that apparently he feels that troops and warriors should have been arrayed differently. "The disposition of his troops was such that in firing upon the warriors they fired directly towards their own lines and also into the camp of the women and children."

And he calls that bad troop arrangement "reprehensible."

Yet the bad troop arrangement would have caused ZERO harm, if some of the Indians had not been stirred up by that medicine man and decided to start shooting. (at least in the accounting of Wells).

And if another post in this thread is to be believed, Miles himself caused quite a bit of death of women and children by his own deliberate orders (rather than by his incompetent troop arrangement).

You make an "obvious conclusion" that women and children were hunted down and killed. Yet other accounts say that most of the deaths happened in the first few minutes. Especially with the rapid firing of the Hotchkiss guns.

And Dewey Beard recounts that people were called from hiding places and then killed, but Wells account has him calling people from hiding (and he would have the language they understood, unlike most of the others there) and rescuing them.

And there is no way to really know, is there. If soldiers were hunting down those escaping in order to capture them, but the people fleeing, naturally being frightened, might not have allowed a capture without a fight. But we do know, for a fact, a fact that you conveniently left out of your OP, that 51 who did give up, or were unable to flee or fight, were captured and then taken care of - and NOT executed.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hfojvt (Reply #37)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 03:40 PM

41. There is overwhelming evidence and testimony from both Native and Non-Native witness's

Last edited Mon Dec 30, 2013, 09:10 PM - Edit history (1)

that the women, and children were hunted down as far as 3 miles from the initial killing fields. You miss the point that both Well's and Dewey Beard's accounts are true. Both happened. Well's account is what one would expect and demand from a military operation against essentially defenseless and women, and children. The latter accounts of Dewey Beard and many others is what history all to often tells us also happens when military cohesion and control is lost on the battle field.

During the administration of Cecilia Fire Thunder in the early 2000's the 7th Calvary attempted to visit Wounded Knee in a training exercise to demonstrate to it's officers the results of the failure of command on the battlefield. Locals prevented them from coming. A lost learning moment for sure, but the wounds still linger there.

Today's 7th Calvary holds up the loss of control and command at Wounded Knee and uses it's horrific example as a training exercise for it's officers today.

They understand. They accept the failure of their own unit and the tarnishment of it's own legacy to ensure that day is never repeated.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 03:30 PM

40. Now, we do it with drones. No horses, rifles, sabers, or conscious required.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 03:49 PM

42. 1890: Dakota doctor witnesses Wounded Knee aftermath

Wounded Knee aftermath
Dr. Charles Eastman, a Dakota, hears reports of a battle. Despite a blizzard and Army efforts to delay him, three days later he arrives with 85 Lakotas and 10 to 15 white civilians who plan to bury the dead at Wounded Knee. Although he had been told that the incident was a battle, Eastman writes that it was massacre, in which those who fled were “relentlessly hunted down”. Amid the destruction he finds a baby girl, named Zinkala Nuni by Lakota survivors, who is adopted by an Army officer.

“Fully three miles from the scene of the massacre we found the body of a woman completely covered with a blanket of snow, and from this point on we found them scattered along as they had been relentlessly hunted down and slaughtered, while fleeing for their lives. Some of our people discovered relatives or friends among the dead, and there was much wailing and mourning. When we reached the spot where the Indian camp had stood, among the fragments of burned tents and other belongings, we saw frozen bodies lying close together or piled one upon another,” Charles Eastman wrote. “It took all my nerve to keep my composure in the face of this spectacle, and of the grief of my Indian companions, nearly everyone of whom was crying aloud or singing his death song.”

?


http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/timeline/378.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mikekohr (Original post)

Mon Dec 30, 2013, 07:24 PM

47. Sadly... kicked

 

"But Smohalla," said I, "the country is all filling up with white people and their herds. The game is nearly all gone. Would it not be better for your young Indians to learn the white man's work ?"

"My young men shall never work," said he with a wave of the hand, including numerous imaginary Indians, as well as the two seated near by. " Men who work cannot dream, and wisdom comes to us in dreams."

" But your young men have to work hard during the fishing season to get food for winter."

"We simply take the gifts that are freely offered. We no more harm the earth than would an infant's fingers harm its mother's breast. But the white man tears up large tracts of land, runs deep ditches, cuts down forests, and changes the whole face of the earth. You know very well this is not right. Every honest man,'" said he, looking at me searchingly, "knows in his heart that this is all wrong. But the white men are so greedy they do not consider these things."

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread