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Thu Feb 13, 2014, 11:01 PM

To those of you who decided to leave corporate America

How did you do it?

what do you do now?

what were your struggles?

describe your emotional level in comparison to your life in the rat race.

thanks in advance and peace to you

7 replies, 1971 views

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Reply To those of you who decided to leave corporate America (Original post)
Quayblue Feb 2014 OP
Squinch Feb 2014 #1
Quayblue Feb 2014 #2
Squinch Feb 2014 #3
Quayblue Feb 2014 #5
NJCher Feb 2014 #4
Quayblue Feb 2014 #7
TBF Feb 2014 #6

Response to Quayblue (Original post)

Thu Feb 13, 2014, 11:21 PM

1. I did it. If you are thinking of it, I hope you have as good an experience with it as I did.

I went from corporate America to a healthcare field where I specialize in pediatrics. I had enjoyed the corporate job, but a day came when it just seemed clear that it was not feeding me any more.

I had to go back to school, so I had a very scary year of prerequisites where I was not sure I was going to get into a program. I had saved some money, but I still needed to take out some loans which was also frightening. I was without a job for three years, which was terrifying.

I had a lot of authority in my old job, and suddenly I was back to the position of being a rank amateur. I had to let go of a lot of the ego that attached to my old achievements, which was the most difficult part. Then I found a Chinese phrase that said, "before you can do something great, you have to look ridiculous to the crowds." I carried that around with me for a few years. You just have to accept that you will be bad at the new thing till you are good at it.

I am grateful every day that I made the change. It was one of the most radical, and most rewarding things I have ever done.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #1)

Thu Feb 13, 2014, 11:46 PM

2. thank you!

I am willing to increase my happiness while appearing ridiculous. Really. I think it's ridiculous I continue to put myself through this.

I have never done well working for others. It's a fact about myself I've come to terms with, but the security is what keeps me working. when I'm tired, I go elsewhere. The stress of it all is not worth it anymore.

I'm glad you found your calling. That is encouraging.

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Response to Quayblue (Reply #2)

Thu Feb 13, 2014, 11:49 PM

3. Good luck to you! I hope you do increase your happiness.

Keep us posted on your progress.

And welcome to DU!

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Response to Squinch (Reply #3)

Fri Feb 14, 2014, 07:15 PM

5. I will

And thank you for the welcome

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Response to Quayblue (Original post)

Fri Feb 14, 2014, 01:04 AM

4. yeah, I left it

I left it for academia. It has been a financial struggle ever since, as I held fairly high-level positions that paid well into the six figures. You would laugh if you knew what I made now.

I didn't like working for other people, either, so that part is good. Academia has a very hands-off position for its teachers.

I left because the work, despite being demanding, was not intellectually challenging. At least that is not a problem in academia.

I left by going back to school. The transition was corporate America, then school, then university teaching.

As I said, though, the biggest problem has been financial. I did not want to leave my home, which is in an expensive area so I have the expenses of someone who makes a lot more money than I do now.

Another problem, much smaller, has been the lack of recognition in my new job. In my old job, my ideas and work yielded a good deal of financial success for the companies I worked for and they rewarded me accordingly. Now I'm in a union and my pay raises depend on what we negotiate. If you do something spectacular, they barely even notice.

The big payoff, however, has been the emotional level, as you put it. It is so much better. Gone are the horrible dysfunctional stretches. Now I am happy every day when I go to work. I find myi work rewarding, fulfilling, and fun. I wouldn't part with it for anything.

Good luck to you!


Cher

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Response to NJCher (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 14, 2014, 07:30 PM

7. lady i won't laugh

I've never made the money I think I'm worth, square biz.

I think I may have a high level of empathy and ethical reasoning and thus have a hard time dealing with shit (I work with torts now and I supremely irritated with all facets of it).

I may be good in social work and public health.

and I'm getting old and it bothers me I'm just now figuring this out. Better late than never though




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Response to Quayblue (Original post)

Fri Feb 14, 2014, 07:21 PM

6. I did it -

But only after I got married. From support in large law firms (salary, OT and benefits) to legal recruiting in small companies. Often leaving will mean less money but more flexibility and I wanted that when I had kids.

Moral support from family and friends helps. Even if you do have a spouse who is working it may be a financial adjustment but you'd be surprised what you can cut if you're motivated.

Good luck!!

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