HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » U.S. talking to Chalabi, ...

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 12:33 PM

 

U.S. talking to Chalabi, originator of WMD lies, while pushing to replace Iraqi leader Maliki

Last edited Thu Jun 19, 2014, 08:04 PM - Edit history (3)

NYT:

BAGHDAD — Alarmed over the Sunni insurgent mayhem convulsing Iraq, the country’s political leaders are actively jockeying to replace Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, American and Iraqi officials said Thursday.

The political leaders have been encouraged by what they see as newfound American support for replacing Mr. Maliki with someone more acceptable to Iraq’s Sunnis and Kurds, as well as to the Shiite majority.

Over the past two days the American ambassador, Robert S. Beecroft, along with Brett McGurk, the senior State Department official on Iraq and Iran, have met with Usama Nujaifi, the leader of the largest Sunni contingent, United For Reform, and with Ahmad Chalabi, one of the several potential Shiite candidates for prime minister, according to people close to each of those factions, as well as other political figures.

read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/20/world/middleeast/maliki-iraq.html

_________________________________________

The fact that our government is comfortably talking to a criminal like Chalabi is the direct result of Congress allowing the Bush administration to walk away scot-free without any real accountability for their crimes in Iraq. Here we have a criminal like Chalabi, who was run out of the office Bush and Cheney gifted him for the bogus information he provided which was used as the initial impetus and justification for the original moves to invade Iraq and overthrow the government, being allowed to pose as some kind of statesman; still getting audiences with U.S. government officials.

It wasn't just that Chalabi had lied to the U.S. about WMDs . . . when they weren't found, Chalabi just brazenly declared that the ends had justified the means.

Chalabi was a wealthy, U.S.-educated banker whose family fled Iraq when the monarchy was overthrown in 1958. Chalabi's CIA contacts led to the formation of the Iraqi National Congress in 1992.

Chalabi's influence in Washington comes from conservatives in and out of the administration who had been advocating for the deposition of Hussein and who were closely associated with the right-wing American Enterprise Institute and the Project for a New American Century; conservatives still pushing for intervention in Iraq; like John McCain.

Chalabi had been tried in exile by a Jordanian court and sentenced to 22 years in prison on 31 charges of embezzlement, theft of more than $70 million, misuse of depositor funds and currency speculation.

Here is a family (Chalabi) that has ingratiated themselves with monied influences, in and out of our government. Their administration benefactors spread our tax dollars around the world with abandon, yet treat the most urgent of our basic needs here at home with miserly neglect. Consistent with Ahmed's U.S. military escort back to his homeland, the Chalabis assumed whatever mandate for power, money, or influence that their Pentagon cabal provided.

In 2002, John McCain claimed that a 'success' behind Bush deceitful coup in Iraq was going to be 'easy,' despite his acceptance of the inevitable casualties. “Because I know that as successful as I believe we will be, and I believe that the success will be fairly easy, we will still lose some American young men or women,” McCain told CNN in 2002. Days later, he backtracked to make a self-serving assurance that American lives would not be squandered for his manipulations in Iraq.

“We’re not going to get into house-to-house fighting in Baghdad," McCain told CNN. "We may have to take out buildings, but we’re not going to have a bloodletting of trading American bodies for Iraqi bodies.”

By the next year, McCain was cocky enough to predict a 'win' behind the invasion and occupation, telling MSNBC that "we will win this conflict. We will win it easily." That was in 2003. That was in the period where the Bush administration and their cohorts in Congress were frantically organizing separate teams of military investigators to comb Iraq for the weapons of mass destruction they had promised they were defending Americans against. As that cynical effort failed to produce any evidence of any weapons or weapons systems which remotely threatened the U.S. they set themselves to the diverting task of organizing and consolidating the real motive behind their opportunistic invasion; the overthrow of Saddam's hapless regime and the installation of their 'interim' junta.

John McCain's friend and primary instigator, enabler, and author of the lies used to justify the U.S. campaign for 'regime change' in Iraq, Ahmed Chalabi, began his deceptions in exile during the Clinton administration and was gifted with the leadership of the 'authority' which was constructed after the invasion to impose and lord their military dominance over the Iraqis.

Chalabi, who McCain called a "patriot," was finally driven out of the interim Iraqi leadership by predictable charges of the same manipulative corruption which had been his trademark. Even as he was elevated by the Bush administration to lord over Iraqis behind the sacrifices of our troops, Chalabi was under indictment for embezzlement and fraud. Chalabi was paid $335,000 a month as he promoted his lies about WMDs to the administration and their enablers in Congress. It was reported in 2004 that Chalabi's group-in-exile, the 'Iraqi National Congress,' received $39 million in tax dollars over 5 years as they promoted their lies.

When confronted about the complete lack of any proof that what he'd sold his U.S. supporters in the administration and Congress, Chalabi shrugged. "As far as we're concerned we've been entirely successful," Chalabi said. "That tyrant Saddam is gone and the Americans are in Baghdad. What was said before is not important."

"We are heroes in error," Chalabi was quoted as saying.

In the fall of 2002 the 'Committee for the Liberation of Iraq' was established in the Washington offices of the right-wing American Enterprise Institute. The CLI engaged in educational and advocacy efforts to mobilize U.S. and international support for policies aimed at ending the regime of Saddam Hussein. This advocacy came at the same time that Condoleezza Rice and her then-deputy Stephen Hadley were engaged in a series of briefings with foreign policy groups, Iraq specialists and other opinion makers that was termed as a "new phase," by a White House spokesman, who described the goal as building fresh public support for Bush administration policy vs. Iraq.

Members of the CLI met in November of 2002 with President Bush's national security adviser, Rice, in an effort they described as "education and advocacy efforts to mobilize U.S. and international support freeing the Iraqi people from tyranny." Members of the Committee for the Liberation of Iraq included, John McCain, Newt Gingrich, William Kristol, General Barry McCaffrey, and former CIA director James Woolsey. George Shultz, Amb. Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security John Bolton, and Elliot Abrams were also involved with the group. Abrams and Bolton were founding members of the CLI.

The CLI lobbied for the installation of the so-called Iraqi National Congress to replace the Hussein dictatorship. This group was the creation of the U.S. Congress which, following testimony from Chalabi, and defense policy executive, Zalmay Khalilzad (later appointed ambassador to Iraq), and the co-sponsoring of Sen. John McCain, passed the Iraq Liberation Act in 1998, and sanctioned the new U.S. policy of regime change.

Among the other participants in the CLI were, Gary Schmitt (director of the conservative foundation, Project for the New American Century) and Richard Perle, (chairman of Rumsfeld's Defense Policy Board, also closely associated with PNAC. Also involved was co-founder, president and executive director of the Committee for the Liberation of Iraq, Randy Scheunemann who served as a consultant on Iraq to Donald Rumsfeld and now serves as John McCain's top foreign policy aide.

In a scheme to hijack the next-generation of defense dollars, which our soldiers desperately need, and our country can scarcely afford McCain's cohort, Randy Scheunemann, headed a Washington lobbying firm called Orion Strategies, which just happened to share Chalabi's address and the location of his old CLI enterprise. His was just one of the investment groups that sprang to life in the wake of the invasion who sought to benefit from the blood and sacrifice of our soldiers.

In fact, Schennemann was partners in his Iraq lobbying with another facilitator for the former Soviet states, Bruce Jackson, the founder and president of the 'Project on Transitional Democracies', an organization which guided ‘newly independent', former Soviet provinces through the congressional appropriations process to connect the foreign leaders with U.S. tax dollars. Their influence led to the acceptance of many of these countries into NATO compliance and membership. The introduction of these former provinces into the NATO resulted in a boon for weapon's manufacturers as the new republics were required to modernize their military forces to comply with NATO defense requirements.

"There is no doubt Saddam Hussein has weapons of mass destruction," Scheunemann had reportedly claimed before the Iraq invasion, promoting the fiction of his fellow nation-builder, Chalabi. It was that self-serving fiction (and others) which he and his nation-building partners used to influence the form, basis, and direction of John McCain's foreign policy.

The McCain/Chalabi collaboration was described in the book by award-winning journalist Aram Roston, "The Man Who Pushed America to War: The Extraordinary Life, Adventures and Obsessions of Ahmad Chalabi." Roston writes that McCain was "Chalabi's favored candidate in the 2000 election since Chalabi knew that he would be able to free up the $97 million in military aid plus millions pushed through in Congress and earmarked for Chalabi's exile group."

According to one report, McCain had initially pressured the administration to give Chalabi more money, signing a letter with four other Republican senators complaining that Chalabi's INC wasn't being funded.

In 2004, it was reported that Chalabi had leaked intelligence to Iran, informing the Iranians that the U.S. had broken their secret communications code. U.S. officials complained that the disclosures meant that Iran's security agencies would have to redo their codes and that, for, perhaps years, American intelligence wouldn't be able to read the transmissions. National security adviser Condoleezza Rice promised Congress a 'full investigation', at the time, but none materialized from the administration.

Also, in 2004 it was reported that Chalabi was counterfeiting old Iraqi dinars - which had been removed from circulation following the fall of Saddam’s regime . . . Police found the counterfeit money along with old dinars in Chalabi’s house during a raid.

The most important position Chalabi was provided by the Bush administration's hawks on Iraq, was the position he was gifted in the new Iraqi regime as the administration's shill within the Iraqi government for their escalation of force. Chalabi's job was to serve as an intermediary between Baghdad residents and the Iraqi and U.S. security forces as they destroyed homes, lives, and livelihoods in Iraq which found themselves in the way of Bush's swaggering advance.

The WSJ reported that Chalabi job was to "help Iraqis arrange reimbursement for damage to their cars and homes caused by the security sweeps in the hope of maintaining public support for the strategy." It's almost certain that Chalabi had his hands all over the unaccountable multi-million dollar money pile the Pentagon reportedly used to pacify the resisting Iraqi communities to facilitate their 'surge'.

In an amazing defiance of the rationale for the pimping he provided for Bush and Petraeus' escalation of force, Chalabi was reported to have 'sabotaged' reconciliation efforts with the Batthists (Chalabi as head of Iraq’s 'de-Baathification commission'); the enabling of which was the main argument Bush gave for his escalation of force to Iraq. The NYT reported that, "Chalabi and members of his organization had sabotaged the American-backed plan by rallying opposition among Shiite government officials in southern Iraq, then taking their complaints to Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, Iraq’s most powerful Shiite cleric."

Chalabi's disruptive and self-serving efforts mirrored McCain's foreign policy advisor Scheunemann's initial, ill-conceived opposition to leaving any members of Saddam's Baath party in government positions in his 2003 declaration that: "It is very difficult for me to conceive of democratic institutions being established in Iraq with the Baathist power structure mostly intact."

AN article published by Blackanthem Military News reported that the Commanding General in Iraq, Gen. Petraeus, took on himself to rehabilitate the duplicitous opportunist who sold the U.S. the lies about threats from Saddam's regime which led Clinton to legislate regime change for Iraq, and provided cover for the Bush administration's invasion and occupation years afterward.

Chalabi was reportedly treated like a visiting dignitary as Petraeus introduced him to members of the 1st Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga. stationed in Iraq.

In 2005, Chalabi, an 'elected' member of the Iraqi parliament, temporarily held the post of Iraqi Oil Minister. Chalabi's new 'job' in Iraq had been to get the country's electricity back in order, five years after the 'shock and awe' of the invasion needlessly destroyed the majority of Iraq's infrastructure. Yet, consistent with every other endeavor Chalabi had been allowed to involve himself in by this administration, it was been reported that, despite Chalabi's involvement, Baghdad's power supply remained "intermittent and well below pre-war levels." That September, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq told Congress that, Iraq's power supply is "woefully inadequate."

It's not as if there hadn't been more than enough discrediting evidence for the U.S. to completely shun the formerly exiled con man after he mislead (admittedly obliging) U.S. officials who were looking to make a case against Saddam.

Once again Chalabi is being fetted by the U.S. government as a front man for their faltering Iraqi regime. Even Chalabi's reported ties to the rebel Shiite group, led by al-Sadr, who has rivaled and worked to disrupt the influence and authority of the Maliki regime, hasn't been enough for the Obama administration to cut ties with the opportunistic confidence man.

In exchange for the short-sighted support Chalabi provided Bush's duplicitous administration for their rape and plunder of Iraq, he's been allowed to maintain an influential (and lucrative) niche in Iraq which has allowed the U.S. occupation's initial enabler to continue his confidence game with impunity.

Chalabi has stalled reconciliation several times in the past, and, it looks like he's now being promoted in that effort by the Obama administration to manage the increasing unrest in Iraq. In allowing Chalabi continued VIP treatment in Iraq, it's almost as if the administration isn't concerned that his lies are what led us to the Iraq debacle. Once again, Chalabi is under consideration by the U.S. as leader of their junta in Iraq.

Surprised?

related:

U.S. Turns to Old Frenemies
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/06/19/u-s-turns-to-old-frenemies-for-new-iraq-war.html

Striking Out at Bush's Phantoms in Iraq
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10025122509

Progress and Successes of the Bush and Maliki Regime
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10025122781

36 replies, 2376 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 36 replies Author Time Post
Reply U.S. talking to Chalabi, originator of WMD lies, while pushing to replace Iraqi leader Maliki (Original post)
bigtree Jun 2014 OP
SamKnause Jun 2014 #1
Comrade Grumpy Jun 2014 #2
bigtree Jun 2014 #4
Turbineguy Jun 2014 #3
WilliamPitt Jun 2014 #5
bigtree Jun 2014 #6
choie Jun 2014 #7
bigtree Jun 2014 #8
KoKo Jun 2014 #9
bigtree Jun 2014 #11
global1 Jun 2014 #10
bigtree Jun 2014 #12
KoKo Jun 2014 #14
bigtree Jun 2014 #15
KoKo Jun 2014 #17
Duppers Jun 2014 #13
bigtree Jun 2014 #16
bigtree Jun 2014 #18
Autumn Jun 2014 #19
bigtree Jun 2014 #20
Autumn Jun 2014 #21
bigtree Jun 2014 #25
Autumn Jun 2014 #27
DCBob Jun 2014 #22
bigtree Jun 2014 #23
DCBob Jun 2014 #24
TheKentuckian Jun 2014 #36
scarletwoman Jun 2014 #26
bigtree Jun 2014 #28
scarletwoman Jun 2014 #30
HooptieWagon Jun 2014 #29
abelenkpe Jun 2014 #31
pa28 Jun 2014 #32
MannyGoldstein Jun 2014 #33
LineLineNew Reply ?
bigtree Jun 2014 #34
whatchamacallit Jun 2014 #35

Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 12:35 PM

1. Surprised ?

Not in the least.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 12:38 PM

2. I didn't realize the US got to choose Iraq's leader.

 

Wasn't there just an election like last month?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Comrade Grumpy (Reply #2)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 12:46 PM

4. I have no idea why American officials have anything to do with the makeup of the Iraqi govt.

 

. . . outside of deciding whether the Iraqi's ultimate choice is worthy of U.S. support and assistance.

They're still behaving as if Iraq's on a string they're holding. It's almost as if we hadn't declared our occupation over. I don't recall the Iraqi government asking for our help in replacing the leader of their regime.

On one hand, they tout Iraq as independent, on the other, we have this latent paternalism. It's no wonder Iraqis feel they're being manipulated by the people we enabled into power there.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 12:42 PM

3. We always get the same characters

and get the same results.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink



Response to WilliamPitt (Reply #5)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 12:50 PM

6. +1

 

. . . good info.

. . . just . . . wow. My fingers feel like lead typing this all out again.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 12:54 PM

7. are you fucking kidding?

n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to choie (Reply #7)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 01:05 PM

8. no kidding

 

. . . unfuckingbelievable.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 01:09 PM

9. I didn't know he was still around...Thought he'd made enough money off us

that he'd slunk off enjoy the fruits of his evil...

Another one of the many who should be indicted for War Crimes....

-----------

The McCain/Chalabi collaboration was described in the book by award-winning journalist Aram Roston, "The Man Who Pushed America to War: The Extraordinary Life, Adventures and Obsessions of Ahmad Chalabi." Roston writes that McCain was "Chalabi's favored candidate in the 2000 election since Chalabi knew that he would be able to free up the $97 million in military aid plus millions pushed through in Congress and earmarked for Chalabi's exile group."

According to one report, McCain had initially pressured the administration to give Chalabi more money, signing a letter with four other Republican senators complaining that Chalabi's INC wasn't being funded.

In 2004, it was reported that Chalabi had leaked intelligence to Iran, informing the Iranians that the U.S. had broken their secret communications code. U.S. officials complained that the disclosures meant that Iran's security agencies would have to redo their codes and that, for, perhaps years, American intelligence wouldn't be able to read the transmissions. National security adviser Condoleezza Rice promised Congress a 'full investigation', at the time, but none materialized from the administration.

Also, in 2004 it was reported that Chalabi was counterfeiting old Iraqi dinars - which had been removed from circulation following the fall of Saddam’s regime . . . Police found the counterfeit money along with old dinars in Chalabi’s house during a raid.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to KoKo (Reply #9)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 01:20 PM

11. so much wrong about Iraq has been dismissed

 

. . . brushed aside by folks assuring us that the consolidation of power behind Maliki made all of the past transgressions moot. It's convenient for people to move 'forward' in Iraq, as Bush used to say, and neglect to press for the righting any of the U.S. wrongs; quick to defend the occupation as an end that justified the means, much like Chalabi's own dismissal when his lies were revealed as false.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 01:16 PM

10. It's Like Deja Vu All Over Again.....nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to global1 (Reply #10)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 01:42 PM

12. One by one I see the old ghosts rising

 

Did you hear 'em talkin' 'bout it on the radio
Did you try to read the writing on the wall
Did that voice inside you say I've heard it all before
It's like Deja Vu all over again

Day by day I hear the voices rising
Started with a whisper like it did before
Day by day we count the dead and dying
Ship the bodies back home while the networks all keep score

Did you hear 'em talkin' 'bout it on the radio
Could your eyes believe the writing on the wall
Did that voice inside you say I've heard it all before
It's like Deja Vu all over again

One by one I see the old ghosts rising
Stumblin' 'cross Big Muddy
Where the light gets dim
Day after day another Mamma's crying
She's lost her precious Child
To a war that has no end

Did you hear 'em talkin' 'bout it on the radio
Did you stop to read the writing at the wall
Did that voice inside you say
I've seen this all before
It's like Deja Vu all over again
It's like Deja Vu all over again

- John Fogerty

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Reply #12)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 02:13 PM

14. Chalabi should have been hauled in..

I can somewhat understand why Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld and PNAC are too big to jail...(given the PTB of both parties supporting them along with MIC) but surely that criminal Chalabi could have been made to pay for war crimes. It would have been a start and a warning. Instead, with no one held accountable, they go at it again and again, each time reaching further.

As the lyrics say, Deja Vu all over again...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to KoKo (Reply #14)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 02:30 PM

15. I wanted to post this statement Pres. Obama just made, as a reflection of what I just posted

 

from WaPo running transcript:


Mr. President. Do you have any confidence in Prime Minister al-Maliki at this point? And can your -- can Maliki bring political stability to Iraq?

PRESIDENT OBAMA: As I said, it’s not our job to chose Iraq’s leaders. Part of what our patriots fought for during many years in Iraq was the right and the opportunity for Iraqis to determine their own destiny and chose their own leaders. But I don’t think it -- there’s any secret that, right now at least, there is deep divisions between Sunni, Shia and Kurdish leaders. And as long as those deep divisions continue or worsen, it’s going to be very hard for an Iraqi central government to direct an Iraqi military to deal with these threats.

And so we’ve consulted with Prime Minister Maliki. And we’ve said that to him privately. We’ve said publicly, that whether he is prime minister or any other leader aspires to lead the country, that it has to be an agenda in which Sunni, Shia and Kurd all feel that they have the opportunity to advance their interest through the political process.

And we’ve seen over the last two years -- actually dating back to 2008, 2009, but I think worse over the last two years -- the sense among Sunnis that their interests were not being served, that legislation that had been promised around, for example, de- Baathification had been stalled. I think that you hear similar complaints that the government in Baghdad has not sufficiently reached out to some of the tribes and been able to bring them into a process that, you know, gives them a sense of being part of -- of a unity government or a single nation-state.



this is what I had to say about Chalabi and de- Baathification:

In an amazing defiance of the rationale for the pimping he provided for Bush and Petraeus' escalation of force, Chalabi was reported to have 'sabotaged' reconciliation efforts with the Batthists (Chalabi as head of Iraq’s 'de-Baathification commission'); the enabling of which was the main argument Bush gave for his escalation of force to Iraq. The NYT reported that, "Chalabi and members of his organization had sabotaged the American-backed plan by rallying opposition among Shiite government officials in southern Iraq, then taking their complaints to Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, Iraq’s most powerful Shiite cleric."



from the NYT article

. . . The latest effort began this spring with the grandly titled Reconciliation and Accountability Law, a proposal backed by Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, the senior American envoy in Iraq until April. The draft decreed that all former Baathists who had worked in the government could collect their pensions. It opened government jobs to thousands more, and set a three-month time limit for Iraqi citizens to bring lawsuits against former members of the Baath Party.

Sunnis supported the overhaul, and Shiites and Kurds were expected to fall in line after the Shiite prime minister and the Kurdish president announced the plan on March 26.

But the law was stymied by Ahmad Chalabi, who headed Iraq’s de-Baathification commission. Mr. Chalabi, the former Pentagon protégé, relies on the commission for an official role in Iraq’s government. Having just renovated a spacious office in the Green Zone, he has strongly opposed any effort to weaken his position or the country’s policy on former Baathists.

According to a senior official with the commission, Mr. Chalabi and members of his organization sabotaged the American-backed plan by rallying opposition among Shiite government officials in southern Iraq, then taking their complaints to Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, Iraq’s most powerful Shiite cleric.

On April 1, Mr. Chalabi visited the ayatollah’s office in Najaf. He later appeared at a news conference, declaring that Ayatollah Sistani told him the law was incomplete and that “there would be other drafts.”

A day later, an aide to the reclusive cleric confirmed that there was “a general feeling of rejection” about the proposal . . .


. . . why are they still talking to this man?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Reply #15)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 03:50 PM

17. It's the DOS doing it. Remember they are infested with...

Neocons/PNAC'ers: Nuland, Pstaki, (sp) a host of others. I don't know why Kerry has to keep them unless they are just too powerful to remove. I don't know whether Hillary brought them in or they were already there in junior positions working their way up.

From your current NYT snip:

Over the past two days the American ambassador, Robert S. Beecroft, along with Brett McGurk, the senior State Department official on Iraq and Iran, have met with Usama Nujaifi, the leader of the largest Sunni contingent, United For Reform, and with Ahmad Chalabi, one of the several potential Shiite candidates for prime minister, according to people close to each of those factions, as well as other political figures.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 01:42 PM

13. Holy Hell! nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 02:59 PM

16. kick

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 07:09 PM

18. kick

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 07:11 PM

19. Oh for fucks sake no

no no no fucking NO.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Autumn (Reply #19)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 08:00 PM

20. yep

 

U.S. Turns to Old Frenemies

On Wednesday, Brett McGurk, the senior State Department official responsible for policy on Iraq, met in Baghdad at the home of Ahmed Chalabi, the former exile leader who was supported by neoconservatives inside the Bush administration before the Iraq war.

The meeting, first reported by the New York Times, was the first time McGurk had traveled to Chalabi’s Baghdad estate, according to Chalabi’s Washington adviser, Francis Brooke. “They discussed the current politics and Dr. Chalabi told him it would be very difficult for (Nouri al) Maliki to continue as prime minister,” Brooke told The Daily Beast.

The outreach to Chalabi is part of a frantic scramble by U.S. military, diplomatic, and intelligence agencies to respond to the growing violence in Iraq before the country collapses. On Thursday, Obama announced that he was sending up to 300 U.S. special operations forces to Iraq—in addition to the 275 such troops already in country. Manned and unmanned aircraft are also now in the region. The U.S.S. George H.W. Bush, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, has been dispatched to the Persian Gulf. Senior U.S. military officials say they have the capability to launch airstrikes within a matter of hours against the Sunni extremists of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), the terror group that has seized control of several key Iraqi cities.

Brooke would not say if Chalabi was eyeing the top job himself. But he did point out that the former exile leader—who is now a member of parliament and a senior member of the Shi’ite party affiliated with Iraq's powerful Hakim family—supported the creation of a national reconciliation committee and the release of Sunni prisoners detained without charge. What’s more, Brooke added, Chalabi “is now open to reconsideration of the national de-Baathification law.”


read more: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/06/19/u-s-turns-to-old-frenemies-for-new-iraq-war.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Reply #20)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 08:13 PM

21. I feel sick. No matter how we vote or who wins the same

fucking murders get what they want.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Autumn (Reply #21)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 09:27 PM

25. Autumn, we didn't elect an anti-war candidate

 

. . . we saw that when President Obama accepted his peace prize in Oslo, and he used the occasion to outline what he called, 'just wars'. This president has always found at least some justification for our military to operate in Iraq; even in the SOFA where Iraqis allow for the type of military 'assistance' that he's advantaging his policy of with these two deployments.

The best that can be said about Pres. Obama's exercise of military force is that he's resisted involving our forces in any more consequential combat since his devastatingly deadly surge in Afghanistan where more American lives were lost providing cover for the Afghan govt.s political goals than Bush had managed to sacrifice there in retaliation for 9-11.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Reply #25)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 09:32 PM

27. bigtree, I trust Obama on most things but to see the same snakes

being touted about just sickens me. Military 'assistance' is one thing, a bitter pill but it can be swallowed. Regime change in Iraq and putting another chosen puppet in place? I can' t sign on for that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 08:23 PM

22. I think you are not interpreting this correctly.

The US is simply meeting with potential candidates based on their popularity in Iraq.. not the ones the US has chosen. We may not like any of them. which is most likely the case. We just trying to the find the least bad potential candidate so we can back them.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DCBob (Reply #22)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 08:57 PM

23. I haven't mistaken that at all

 

. . . you should find a reason to at least cringe when our government is consulting on the future leadership of Iraq with the man who was the original, unrepentant liar that Bush and others used to involve us in that invasion and overthrow in the first place with an admitted pack of lies.

It's not a question of whether we 'choose' their new leadership. We should have absolutely no influence in that decision, but it would be incredibly naive to believe we'd provide millions of dollars to the new regime and millions more in manpower and military equipment without manipulating the outcome.

It would concern me even if this report just mentioned that our State Dept. was just talking to some uncontroversial blokes who were pure as the driven snow. What the hell are they doing openly courting potential candidates while the U.S. president hints and urges a change in the Iraqi government while holding our military forces over their heads?

One of the most amazing abuses of power came when the Maliki regime came into being, with the invading and occupying forces posturing as if they were protecting the integrity of Iraqi democracy while pointing their weapons at the government's opposition; Maliki actively working on their disenfranchisement.

I get your point, we don't have any business in choosing their leader, but, neither do we have any business helping direct military attacks against the population while complaining about the need for political reconciliation. It's a self-defeating enterprise; just as it's always been since the days when Bush was encouraging regime change in Iraq behind the threat and exercise of our military.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Reply #23)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 09:09 PM

24. I wouldnt use the world "consulting".. I think its more like interviewing.

Why should we have no influence at all? That's a bit extreme and naïve as you said. I don't think we should get involved again militarily unless the shit really hits the fan there. I protested against the original Iraq war back before it started and believe it was huge blunder but we now have some responsibility there since we were the ones to create this mess... even though it was Bush its still the US. It complicated for sure.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DCBob (Reply #24)

Sat Jun 21, 2014, 12:56 PM

36. We may be responsible but we have no ability to put Humpty Dumpy together again

And have refused to hold wrongdoers accountable and the same crew wields tremendous, if not overriding influence.

The shit is going to hit the fan because such is inevitable and all we can do is spread more shit. Look at the pieces on the board here, we can only make matters worse there and at home.

I understand the sentiment but there is nothing we can do to "fix" anything. The toothpaste isn't going back in the tube no matter how many Iraqis we zilch out or how much money we throw at the MIC, nor which radicals we prop up.

At this point, we are a crackhead, molester father. We might be responsible for the kids but we are also fundamentally incapable of being so and no the magic of Obama's touch is not going to heal it either.

You can't unscrew the pooch and all of the original architects of the screw up are still at least greatly influencing us and their motivations objectives permeate the entire situation.

What do you folks think we can do that is good?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 09:27 PM

26. Thank you for this important, albeit extremely distressing post.

I wish I could think of a trenchant comment, but words fail me at the moment. It's just all so ugly and misbegotten...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to scarletwoman (Reply #26)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 10:09 PM

28. it's agonizingly predictable

 

. . . no accountability for the architects and orchestrators in the last administration; no clear repudiation of those crimes, abuses, and mistakes from the succeeding administration.

Pres. Obama accepted and adopted both Bush justifications that we were defending democracy in Iraq and defending our national security. That made a return militarily likely and probably inevitable.

I see where Carney said the president is interested in repealing the 2002 AUMF, but it's hard to believe he'd completely cut the lines of opportunity to interject our military in some way in Iraq. He's still enamored (albeit, not as much as Bush and Cheney) with the U.S.'s Iraq prize.

Pres. Obama just can't let go of the notion that there's something the U.S. military is good for in Iraq. There's almost no realization apparent from the administration that U.S. military activity in these supposedly sovereign nations does little more than fuel and foster violent, resistant opposition. It's right there in Bush's own intelligence assessments. It's not rocket science.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Reply #28)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 11:45 PM

30. We are all trapped in the belly of the Beast that is the U.S. Imperial project/MIC - even Obama.

I despair, I truly despair.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 11:29 PM

29. Curveball wasn't available?

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 11:47 PM

31. K&R

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 11:55 PM

32. What happened to the whole idea of democracy and self determination?

I think 9 out of 10 Iraqis would agree we've "helped" enough. We don't need to "help" them more by replacing their elected leader with a grifter like Chalabi.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Thu Jun 19, 2014, 11:58 PM

33. "Maybe Cheney will realize I'm a man Republicans can do business with"

 

"then he'll tell Boehner to shake on the Grand Bargain"

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MannyGoldstein (Reply #33)

Sat Jun 21, 2014, 11:55 AM

34. ?

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bigtree (Original post)

Sat Jun 21, 2014, 11:59 AM

35. "Chalabi is different now because Obama"

Won't be long before this sentiment is supported.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread