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Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:38 PM

If 6 Turned Out to be 9

Jimi Hendrix died on this date in 1970. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame calls Hendrix “arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music.” A heck of a lot of his music has been released over the years -- far more since his death, than in his brief career -- and I think the sum total of that music shows that he was far more than an extremely talented guitarist.

As the youngest of five kids growing up in the 1960s, I was exposed to Hendrix by way of his debut album, “Are You Experienced?” But it wasn’t until after that I quit boxing -- and the disciplined life that sport demands -- that I really got hooked on him. In my teen years, I began collecting as many of his albums as possible (including some rather low-quality records that he may have played on in the background).

Some of my favorites are found on a 5 LP collection from Germany, of Hendrix playing Motown. His version of “Hang On Sloopy,” for example, is wonderful. The enjoyment he felt in performing those songs comes through. It’s in stark contrast to some of his later work, where the frustrations and pain he experienced is evident.

I have over 70 different Hendrix albums; a good number of CDs (including an outstanding 4 CD box set released a few years back, that a fellow DUer told me about); a few biographies; and a number of DVDs of his concerts.

Thirty years ago, sitting in this very room, I remember my sister-in-law telling me about meeting Jimi. Her (first) husband played in a band that opened for the Experience on a concert tour. She said that she was in the dressing room backstage before the concert, when Hendrix walked in. She stepped back, to get out of his way, and accidentally knocked over his guitar.

I had another friend who told me about joining the US Marines, eager to go defend democracy in Vietnam. By chance, he and a couple friends went to a concert to “beat up hippies” the week before they were to go to Vietnam. The concert was Woodstock. He described finding that he actually liked hippies. Someone shared some LSD with him. He figured it couldn’t be much different than whiskey (surprise, surprise!). He was tripping the morning that Jimi played the Star Spangled Banner, and he said it was then that he knew he did not want to go to Vietnam.

I’m curious what others here remember about Jimi Hendrix?

Thanks,
H2O Man

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Arrow 60 replies Author Time Post
Reply If 6 Turned Out to be 9 (Original post)
H2O Man Sep 2014 OP
msanthrope Sep 2014 #1
H2O Man Sep 2014 #2
msanthrope Sep 2014 #5
pinboy3niner Sep 2014 #3
H2O Man Sep 2014 #10
pinboy3niner Sep 2014 #58
tridim Sep 2014 #4
H2O Man Sep 2014 #11
iscooterliberally Sep 2014 #6
H2O Man Sep 2014 #12
iscooterliberally Sep 2014 #18
JI7 Sep 2014 #20
Dont call me Shirley Sep 2014 #43
thucythucy Sep 2014 #7
H2O Man Sep 2014 #31
hobbit709 Sep 2014 #8
H2O Man Sep 2014 #32
kentuck Sep 2014 #9
H2O Man Sep 2014 #33
ScreamingMeemie Sep 2014 #13
babydollhead Sep 2014 #14
H2O Man Sep 2014 #34
True Earthling Sep 2014 #15
cascadiance Sep 2014 #21
Zorra Sep 2014 #26
H2O Man Sep 2014 #37
frazzled Sep 2014 #16
H2O Man Sep 2014 #36
busterbrown Sep 2014 #17
dhol82 Sep 2014 #35
H2O Man Sep 2014 #38
nolabear Sep 2014 #19
Tikki Sep 2014 #22
livetohike Sep 2014 #48
Tikki Sep 2014 #56
Octafish Sep 2014 #23
Zorra Sep 2014 #24
BobbyBoring Sep 2014 #25
spanone Sep 2014 #27
BeyondGeography Sep 2014 #28
immoderate Sep 2014 #29
tkmorris Sep 2014 #30
immoderate Sep 2014 #41
RagAss Sep 2014 #39
logosoco Sep 2014 #40
Skittles Sep 2014 #42
azurnoir Sep 2014 #44
Blue_In_AK Sep 2014 #45
Enthusiast Sep 2014 #46
Blue_In_AK Sep 2014 #51
Enthusiast Sep 2014 #60
livetohike Sep 2014 #47
zappaman Sep 2014 #49
wilt the stilt Sep 2014 #50
Blue_In_AK Sep 2014 #52
Glassunion Sep 2014 #53
ms liberty Sep 2014 #54
kohodog Sep 2014 #55
Warren Stupidity Sep 2014 #57
panader0 Sep 2014 #59

Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:41 PM

1. My mother was at that same concert that shut down the NY State Thruway, pregnant with me.

 

Apparently, "Little Wing" could always get me to go to sleep.

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Response to msanthrope (Reply #1)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:43 PM

2. The live version

of that (first released on "Hendrix in the West," now included on the boxed CD set) is so good! And it's a great example of his strength with lyrics.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #2)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:49 PM

5. I bought that boxed set about 30 seconds after the first copy hit the shelf at Tower Records in NYC.

 

Yeah...I love Hendrix. No one has matched him since.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:45 PM

3. I remember my little brother playing Jimi for me on his stereo in Vietnam

We didn't get to play music out in the field, so when I visited my brother's basecamp he was excited to show off his PX-bought stereo system and the great albums he had. Jimi was VERY popular among the troops in Vietnam.

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #3)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:58 PM

10. Interesting.

A number of my friends have told me that, too .....about Jimi Hendrix's popularity among the troops. One said that he believed it was for the "raw emotion" in his music. I'm curious what your opinion is on this.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #10)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 10:30 PM

58. Probably for the same reasons that fans at home liked him

Anything from home was popular there (those were still the days of Mail Call, which was a real BFD). And music that Armed Forces Radio didn't include in its playlists was naturally sought out.

Of course, generational music was popular among troops who were, on average, 19 years old when they arrived in-country.

Troops who stayed in basecamps had 'hooches,' or rooms where they bunked, where they could personalize their space and set up stereo systems.

You could buy stereo components from the PX, with the typical setup including turntable, tuner/amp, at least two speakers and a reel-to-reel tape recorder. (Because I was out in the field I ordered my PX components and had them shipped home. I may still have the PX bill, which came to $600+ for the whole shebang, including two extra, larger, speakers.) We went for stuff from Sansui, Akai, Pioneer...

I wish I could pick up the phone and ask my brother for his insight, but he died 3 years ago. I know he would have been able to respond much better than I.

R.I.P., Jim.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:48 PM

4. He died before I was born, but 40 years later...

I consider him my favorite guitar teacher. I've listened to, studied and replicated almost every note he has played and have never been bored with any of it. The man was brilliant.

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Response to tridim (Reply #4)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:02 PM

11. One of my

younger son's friends can play a lot of Hendrix's music. I'm impressed. (I attempted to master the guitar, but never was any good. Not from lack of effort -- just an absolute lack of talent!)

His friend told me that he likes to imagine what Jimi could have produced with the equipment of today.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:50 PM

6. I didn't discover Hendrix until almost a decade after he was gone.

I was in high school learning how to play the guitar. I thought his playing was totally amazing. I read that he hated his own vocals though, and was apparently very self conscious about them. I did read one story that he made fun of one of his most mis-heard lyrics during a concert in DC. 'Excuse me while I kiss this guy' and blew an air kiss to one of his band mates. I wish he was still around. I love watching his videos. I only have one CD compilation though. Thanks for posting this! I looked at the date this morning at work and thought about him, but this is the only thing I've seen online about him today.

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Response to iscooterliberally (Reply #6)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:04 PM

12. That's true.

He thought his voice was awful. Apparently, it was listening to Bob Dylan's singing that convinced him that his voice wasn't that important.

It's funny: I think his voice is beautiful.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #12)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:22 PM

18. I agree with you. I always loved his voice.

I liked those types of stories about him too, because it made him more human. It was encouraging and inspiring. I went on to play the bass for many years with no day job. I never was famous or anything, but it sure was fun, and I got to travel the world. One of my favorite tunes of his was Wait Until Tomorrow - 'click bang what hang, your daddy just shot poor me'. The guitar playing was amazing and the lyrics were quite funny too.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #12)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:30 PM

20. his talking voice was beautiful also

Found this recently and noticed how he seems a bit shy and downplays his talent.

http://m.

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Response to H2O Man (Reply #12)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:59 PM

43. I loved his voice too, quiet and strong.

Amazing guitarist too

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:52 PM

7. One of my favorite not officially issued

during his lifetime albums is "Loose Ends," an English import. I have it on vinyl.

It gave me quite a chuckle, listening to "The Stars That Play with Laughing Sam's Dice" and realizing that the acronym was "STP with LSD." Also, the best version ever of "Jam 292." I always thought that the Stevie Ray Vaughn tune "Soul to Soul" was his take on "292."

And you're right, Hendrix was far more than an accomplished instrumentalist. Had he lived, I think he'd be up there with Miles Davis as a composer. Hell, maybe even Bach, considering that in three short years he produced hundreds of hours of original music, including extended suites like "1983: A Merman I Should Be" and "Poli-gap." Absolute genius, is what he was.

Alas, I was too young ever to see the man in person, or even be aware of his music contemporaneously. But it's been a wonderful ride, finding out about him since.

Best wishes.

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Response to thucythucy (Reply #7)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:39 PM

31. I have an

album of him playing jazz. It's not a favorite, but it is good, and shows the guy had a lot of talent. Like some others at the time (such as Jim Morrison), he became somewhat trapped by fans who wanted the freak show every time he appeared on stage.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:52 PM

8. he was one of those that when he played, something fired in your nervous system.

One of the best of the many musicians I've seen play.

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Response to hobbit709 (Reply #8)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:40 PM

32. Well said!

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 03:52 PM

9. I chose Lorraine over Jimi...

I was stationed at Ft Lee VA and a bunch of friends were going up to Woodstock to see Jimi but I chose to go back and see a girlfriend in KY that weekend.

So, Lorraine, wherever you are today, I want you to know that I chose you over Jimi.

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Response to kentuck (Reply #9)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:41 PM

33. It seems to me

that this could be the stuff of a good song, "Lorraine."

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:05 PM

13. I was born in June of the year he died.

He's just "good" in my opinion. I think he is bigger than life because of his tragic death, and that's okay... but I tend not to make more of people than they are. No life-changing events in my life set to his music, and I don't see much emoting in his music on his part. I think he is a tragic figure in a country filled with them. Nothing more, nothing less.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:05 PM

14. the first time I heard Hendrix

was in a stoner's apartment , they had the speakers set up around the whole room. It was quadraphonics and youth and the most incredible experience, the way the music moved around the room and drew in in, then out. It was alive. even tho this was 1980, it was new to my teenage ears.

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Response to babydollhead (Reply #14)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:43 PM

34. I have heard

that certain chemicals enhanced the experience of listening to his music.I assume that this is the reason that Nancy Reagan wore Jimi Hendrix t-shirts while recording her "Just Say No!" bit.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:08 PM

15. If 6 was 9

is the correct name of the song...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/If_6_Was_9

Interpretation[edit]
The theme has been described as an "individualist anthem".[4] The lyrics portray the underlying conflict of the counterculture of the 1960s: the "social and cultural dichotomies" between the hippies and the "white collared conservative" business world of the establishment. Beginning with a blues riff, the lyrics accompany a "spacey" free-form jam, with Hendrix epitomizing the existentialist voice of the youth movement: "I'm the one that's gonna have to die when it's time for me to die/so let me live my life/the way I want to."[5]

Authors Harry Shapiro and Caesar Glebbeek believe the lyrics, "if the mountains fell into the sea" are a reference to the creation myth of the second world of Hopi mythology.[6] Frank Waters' Book of the Hopi (1963) was known to have influenced Hendrix, and many of his songs contain mythological themes and images related to Native Americans in the United States;[7] Hendrix himself was part Cherokee.[8]

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Response to True Earthling (Reply #15)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:32 PM

21. Coincidentally, just this morning my odometer went to 96000 on the way to work...

 



Looking for when it will be 96969 not too long from now!

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Response to True Earthling (Reply #15)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:11 PM

26. But what if 6 had turned out to be 9?


Polonius:
This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Farewell, my blessing season this in thee!

Laertes:
Most humbly do I take my leave, my lord.

Hamlet Act 1, scene 3, 78–82

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Response to True Earthling (Reply #15)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:46 PM

37. I just got my litter airy permit.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:19 PM

16. My story is short

I arrived in New York City one sunny fall day in September 1968, ready to start college there . And walking in Washington Square Park that first afternoon I saw Jimi Hendrix. It wasn't that I heard him play or anything. I just saw him walking across the park and recognized him. And I thought, "Gosh, I'm in New York!"

That's my story. Except that I loved his music.

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Response to frazzled (Reply #16)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:45 PM

36. Very good!

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:20 PM

17. It was widely reported that Jimi Possessed a huge....

Its been over 5 hrs since a DU jury has been called to action.

Thought it was time...

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Response to busterbrown (Reply #17)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:45 PM

35. yeah - remember that movie


think it was called 'the plaster casters.'

it was very very weird.



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Response to dhol82 (Reply #35)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:47 PM

38. Ah, the two

infamous groupies .....

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:28 PM

19. A house in Seattle recently sold that claimed he practiced in the basement.

We toured it and I stood in awe in that big old bare room. I suspect it's true; he had to do it somewhere and it's in the right location, and I've never heard that claim before, and I'm a hobby house-tourer.

And the Experience Music Project has a fabulous exhibit, including the guitar (or what's left) he played at Woodstock and the one he set on fire in England (or what's left of it). It is in two pieces but you can see where what I think were little "helper" fuel jets. There's a continuous bunch of concert and interview footage, and some charming things like a note he wrote to a young girl fan. And that hat.

I could spend hours there.

Oh, Jimi. What a talented man.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:32 PM

22. Well, he was from Seattle and I was living in Seattle at the time. I love his music...

It is very conceptual, but it is Rock and Roll.

My husband had just been with a job a short time working the over night shift and we decided not to go to the
Seattle concert because he didn't want to lose his job, but some friends of ours from the
Eastern side of the Mountains came over and stayed with us that week and I made them some special
tops to go with their hip hugger bell bottoms for the Hendrix concert.

One was a little jacket from deep purple crushed velvet like this:

and the other was a metallic stripped tunic with a round stand up collar from fabric like this only all metallic..

They had a great time, told me all about the show and the ironic thing is a couple weeks later my husband got his draft notice. We probably would have gone to the concert if he knew he was going to have to leave his job soon, anyway.

I love the Hendrix version of Dylan's "all Along the Watchtower".


Tikki ps...when you play your Hendrix always separate your speakers.

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Response to Tikki (Reply #22)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 07:25 PM

48. Love your story and the fabric. What's stopping us from dressing this way now?

I saved some of my old clothes, including a pair of patched jeans made from scraps of material of all the dresses I sewed in high school.

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Response to livetohike (Reply #48)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 09:29 PM

56. It's kind of amazing because when I showed this post to my husband he said he wouldn't have....


minded me going to the Concert with my friends, but I was a newly wed and wanted to
do everything with my husband and then he got drafted and I learned to do so much as a young adult by myself which actually made my husband very proud of me.


Tikki
PS I still sew and am introducing my granddaughter to clothing construction.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:33 PM

23. You got that Polydor one, ''Loose Ends''?



One of its great tunes:



If not, don't worry. I'll bring my copy. I don't mind.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 04:44 PM

24. The intro to "Hey Joe" was the first really cool lick I learned to play on the guitar.

I love Jimi's music, I think his version of "All Along The Watchtower" is the best produced rock song ever.

I had a poster of Jimi on my wall that said "I'll meet you in the next world...don't be late".

"I thought it was beautiful"





He was way, way outside the box, and had a "native intelligence" a way of perceiving the world, that was beyond what most people can understand, and his guitar playing is one example of that. No matter how hard I try, even when I play his licks note for note, using my Strat, Marshall, and similar analog effects to what he used, it never sounds remotely the same as when he played them.

Most every guitar player on the planet who knows Jimi's music has a great respect for Jimi's technique, ability, and creativity. He was a master and a natural genius.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:07 PM

25. I remember Jimi totally changed the direction of music!

I was lucky enough to be around and lucky enough to see him although it was with Buddy Miles and Billy Cox. Still great, but the Experience was the best IMHO. Manic Depression was the first song I learned to play in 3/4 ( I'm a drummer).
I was going through Middleburg VA with friends on the way to DC when news of his death was announced on the radio. I felt like I lost my best friend.
To this day, I still have to have a daily Jimi fix. That will never change and there will never be another Jimi.
RIP

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:11 PM

27. as a guitarist i was awestruck at his first album. still am.

i remember seeing him on the dick cavett show and he was so sweet, honest and humble.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:19 PM

28. The Brits have the only Hendrix museum

or, as they put it, the only recognized Hendrix residence:

http://www.handelhouse.org/discover/jimi-hendrix

London really was the bomb in the 60's for rock'n roll. Picture Hendrix wandering the neighborhood looking for places to play. Whenever there's any confusion in the room about what the 60's meant to popular music, I think of vignettes like that.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:23 PM

29. I was at Woodstock. An overwhelming experience...

 

But my close up experience with Jimi was at Ungano's, which was on W 72 Street in Manhattan. I was there for my favorite group, the NRBQ, who were living in Clinton Corners at the time. It was a mid week late booking, and there were about a dozen people in the club, and the 'Q was finishing up what I would have to call an unremarkable set, when Jimi walked in, to see them.

I'll interject that though the NRBQ is a relatively esoteric group, they are a favorite of many super famous musicians, and this was Jimi's time.

Jimi sat in the middle of the almost empty club, with two young women (in those less enlightened days, they were "hippie chicks" ) And a vast charge of electricity went through the group on stage, and suddenly it was a new morning. I sat next to Jimi, and was able to observe what he listened to and reacted to. We didn't interact much. (He might have been stoned. I was.) He was all smiles, and left as the set ended.

I saw Jimi jam at Ungano's another time. He liked to play the blues.

--imm

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Response to immoderate (Reply #29)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:37 PM

30. You sat next to Jimi Hendrix to watch NRBQ at Ungano's?

OK. That is officially the coolest thing that never happened to me.

I have got to get out more...

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Response to tkmorris (Reply #30)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:53 PM

41. Before there was an internet...

 

People could get paid for being a "rock and roll critic." And club owners would welcome you. Those were the days.

--imm

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:47 PM

39. Plugging into electric organ speakers....

Like every great musical artist.....he chased unique sound.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:53 PM

40. So much talent from one person in such a short time on the planet.

His skill will influence guitar players for generations to come.


(and I just wanted to be in this thread with other people who saw him in person!)

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 05:54 PM

42. loved, loved LOVED Jimi

was living in England when he passed and was crushed - I was very young but old enough to realize how uniquely talented he was

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 06:03 PM

44. The way he's (re)discovered by every generation since his passing

I remember being in a record store 20 years ago and some kids talking about this guy named Jimi Hendrix, who did really great music looking for his stuff-more recently my son who's 17 and his friends again the same story and couple of others in between

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 06:34 PM

45. I don't mind.

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Response to Blue_In_AK (Reply #45)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 06:49 PM

46. Might as well post this.

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Response to Enthusiast (Reply #46)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 07:53 PM

51. I always loved these words

at the end

"I'm the one that's gotta die when it's time for me to die, so let me live my life the way I want to."

That pretty well sums up my philosophy of life.

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Response to Blue_In_AK (Reply #51)

Fri Sep 19, 2014, 03:23 AM

60. Me too. It seems like yesterday but it was so long ago.

We used to dissect the lyrics of thousands of songs. It was just something we did back in the day.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 07:11 PM

47. On this date, I was a Freshman in college at a state university north of Pittsburgh. I was working

in the cafeteria and one of my friends came in to tell me he heard that Jimi died. The day before, we were excited about buying tickets to see Jimi in Pittsburgh (he had not been to Pgh. before) and I had not seen him in concert. I loved his music from the first time I heard Purple Haze on the radio. I remember where I was when I first heard the Are You Experienced album. I loved everything about his music, but especially the lyrics.

I visited Jimi's grave in 1982 and just sat there and heard the music. Nothing was growing in front of his headstone.....I think it was from all of the flowers, etc. people left there. When we pulled into the cemetery, we went into the office to ask where to find the grave. My husband said to the director, "We're looking for the grave of a friend." That's how it felt.

In 1987, I was working as a manager in a manufacturing plant in Los Angeles. One of the production control employees came into my area and I had to look twice! He looked just like Jimi. I went up to him and said, "Excuse me, but are you related to Jimi Hendrix?" Then I looked at his badge and his last name was Hendrix!. He was his second cousin. He was a ten years old when Jimi died, but he collected everything he could find regarding Jimi. One day, he gave me a cassette tape he made of bootleg songs from live concerts. I still play it (and really should burn a CD).

So here is my favorite Jimi song - at least at this moment. Rest in peace Jimi.




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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 07:29 PM

49. I have a signed Hendrix CD which only cost $700.

You would think his autograph would be more...

How about 6 AND 9?

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 07:40 PM

50. n Jan. 1, 1970 my friend called

 

me with tix for the band of Gypsy's show at the Fillmore east. It was snowing so i begged off and he took another friend. I said i would see him next time. He died 4 months later. I blew that one and I saw everyone back then.

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Response to wilt the stilt (Reply #50)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 07:55 PM

52. That happened to me, too.

He was in Denver in '69 and I didn't have any money for the show. Same thought - I'll catch him next time...

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 08:07 PM

53. Sadly his train left before mine arrived.

That said, I bump into him every time I pick up my guitar.

You can hear a little bit of him every time I strum away.

He was a huge influence on me. Young black man, in an absolutely passionate love affair with rock. Heavy, loud, smooth, aggressive, tender, rough rock.

His finger style took me 6 months to master, his blues I still go back to.

Whenever I need an escape, I drop down a 1/2 step and play along with the greatest 12 minutes and 37 seconds ever recorded. Machine gun, 1970 - Band of Gypsys.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 08:14 PM

54. A funny story for you...

My husband and I met in karate class in 1994 ( we just celebrated our 19th wedding anniversary on Tuesday). We had just begun dating; we were standing in a waiting/ lounge area of this place, which was really just the instructors very large basement. There was a kid about 15/16 years old (we were in our later 20's and early thirties at that time) sitting by where we were standing, talking to a couple of his friends and in his best west coast imitation voice - for a kid in rural NC, lol - said "yea man, Kurt Cobain is the greatest guitarist out of Seattle ever!" and the future mr liberty and I just looked at each other; I may have lifted an eyebrow, and mr liberty said, "Really? You might want to check out this dude, Jimi Hendrix." Next class, the kid came in and made a point of finding mr liberty and thanking him for blowing his mind, lol. We were very happy to have expanded his horizons! One of the things that brought us together was our shared love of music, and so far its worked out pretty well!

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 08:59 PM

55. Synesthesia

I never got to see Jimi, but it has been reported that he had synesthesia, where you see music as colors.

Once, when I was on lsd, listening to Electric Ladyland, the music turned to color, an unbelievably beautiful experience that has never left me and probably had influence on my current art work that combines painting and LED lights.
I never saw Hendrix live but definitely experienced him!
Btw, this may well have happened in 69 (if 6 turned out to be 9).

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 10:12 PM

57. Jimi and acid was the best.

 

Listening to one of his records while tripping was just a giant fuck fest of orgasmic colorized musical entanglements.

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Response to H2O Man (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 11:21 PM

59. I saw Jimi in Portland, Oregon, two days after my 18th birthday. Fall tour '68

The details are a bit hazy, but as I remember it, the cops turned on the lights and shut the show down when he was finishing with 'The Star Spangled Banner'.

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