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Thu Oct 30, 2014, 08:59 AM

Ebola can be spread through the droplets of a cough or sneeze.

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/infections-spread-by-air-or-droplets.pdf

97 replies, 4430 views

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Reply Ebola can be spread through the droplets of a cough or sneeze. (Original post)
Nuclear Unicorn Oct 2014 OP
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #1
Nuclear Unicorn Oct 2014 #2
Warpy Oct 2014 #74
Nuclear Unicorn Oct 2014 #85
Warpy Oct 2014 #90
Nuclear Unicorn Oct 2014 #94
LisaL Oct 2014 #3
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #8
PDJane Oct 2014 #11
LisaL Oct 2014 #27
catbyte Oct 2014 #38
LisaL Oct 2014 #80
catbyte Oct 2014 #82
Mojorabbit Oct 2014 #89
Mojorabbit Oct 2014 #88
bullwinkle428 Oct 2014 #44
Logical Oct 2014 #97
woodsprite Oct 2014 #14
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #17
HereSince1628 Oct 2014 #23
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #25
HereSince1628 Oct 2014 #29
LisaL Oct 2014 #32
HereSince1628 Oct 2014 #37
LisaL Oct 2014 #41
Warpy Oct 2014 #75
HereSince1628 Oct 2014 #79
magical thyme Oct 2014 #42
KMOD Oct 2014 #47
magical thyme Oct 2014 #50
Skidmore Oct 2014 #68
pnwmom Oct 2014 #78
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #81
pnwmom Oct 2014 #84
notrightatall Oct 2014 #4
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #6
notrightatall Oct 2014 #9
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #10
riqster Oct 2014 #19
freshwest Oct 2014 #49
riqster Oct 2014 #64
Stardust Oct 2014 #70
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #83
Stardust Oct 2014 #87
freshwest Oct 2014 #55
Travelman Oct 2014 #76
Fred Sanders Oct 2014 #95
belzabubba333 Oct 2014 #5
KittyWampus Oct 2014 #7
notrightatall Oct 2014 #12
PDJane Oct 2014 #16
riqster Oct 2014 #13
Fred Sanders Oct 2014 #24
riqster Oct 2014 #30
freshwest Oct 2014 #57
Nuclear Unicorn Oct 2014 #43
riqster Oct 2014 #63
Nuclear Unicorn Oct 2014 #66
HereSince1628 Oct 2014 #73
Erich Bloodaxe BSN Oct 2014 #15
Nitram Oct 2014 #18
Avalux Oct 2014 #20
yellowcanine Oct 2014 #21
Nuclear Unicorn Oct 2014 #59
yellowcanine Oct 2014 #65
Octafish Oct 2014 #22
riqster Oct 2014 #26
Octafish Oct 2014 #40
riqster Oct 2014 #69
seabeyond Oct 2014 #28
snooper2 Oct 2014 #31
SheilaT Oct 2014 #33
Puzzledtraveller Oct 2014 #34
Historic NY Oct 2014 #35
gollygee Oct 2014 #36
sharp_stick Oct 2014 #39
magical thyme Oct 2014 #48
LynneSin Oct 2014 #45
freshwest Oct 2014 #53
magical thyme Oct 2014 #46
Warren Stupidity Oct 2014 #51
seabeyond Oct 2014 #56
jen63 Oct 2014 #52
longship Oct 2014 #54
MuseRider Oct 2014 #58
morningfog Oct 2014 #60
mercuryblues Oct 2014 #61
upaloopa Oct 2014 #62
Progressive dog Oct 2014 #67
librechik Oct 2014 #71
Feral Child Oct 2014 #72
Fred Sanders Oct 2014 #96
SoCalDem Oct 2014 #77
polichick Oct 2014 #93
Beaverhausen Oct 2014 #86
polichick Oct 2014 #91
polichick Oct 2014 #92

Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:01 AM

1. the family of patient zero who dealt with him are ebola negative and im sure

 

he was coughing at the time he was dying

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:03 AM

2. And?

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Reply #2)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:10 AM

74. And that means it's not that easy to catch

Most aerosolized droplets are not respiratory fluids, they come from projectile vomiting late in the disease. Mr. Duncan was able to get to the toilet in time and that's why his family didn't get sick. They don't have flush toilets in most houses in Liberia, so their families get sick.

You can't get sick from any person who is not showing symptoms.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #74)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:43 AM

85. You should write the CDC and tell them to correct their graphic. nt

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Reply #85)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 12:25 PM

90. And you need to watch those weasel words

like "may" and "might" and "could."

Try focusing on what is for a change.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #90)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 01:06 PM

94. Congratulations on turning the term "weasel words" into a weasel phrase.

Perhaps you could climb off your high horse long enough to tell me which "weasel words" I employed that inaccurately represent what is contained at the link.

I wrote --

Ebola can be spread through the droplets of a cough or sneeze.


can
kan/
verb
modal verb: can

1.
be able to.
"they can run fast"

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:03 AM

3. Numerous family members in Africa have caught it from the infected family members.

But hey, it didn't happen in Mr. Duncan's case so it can't happen, right?

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Response to LisaL (Reply #3)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:07 AM

8. we arent in africa and there may have been other factors you know since we're not in africa

 

but go on and set your hair on fire,duct tape your windows , wear a garbage bag with your goggles

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Response to LisaL (Reply #3)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:11 AM

11. Not from droplets from coughs and sneezes, they didn't.

I did not expect this kind of over-reaction from relatively educated people.

Frankly, it's depressing....and the original article states what is and isn't contagious.

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Response to PDJane (Reply #11)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:53 AM

27. How do you know?

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Response to LisaL (Reply #27)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:07 AM

38. Please explain to me, if it's so contagious, how not one American health care worker

has gotten sick in the 4 decades they've been treating Ebola until very recently? Sanitary conditions and cultural practices in Africa are very different than they are here. It's not common practice here for family members to care for patients in the hospital to the extent they do in Africa, nor is it common here to wash the corpse of the dead like in Africa. I am also disappointed in the hair-on-fire reaction of the American public, but it makes sense because a fearful population is an easily-controlled population, and that's just how the baggers want us.

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Response to catbyte (Reply #38)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:25 AM

80. How many American health care workers have been treating Ebola patients until the current outbreak?

Previous outbreaks were in remote areas of Africa. Therefore very small. They burned themselves out.

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Response to LisaL (Reply #80)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:30 AM

82. Yeah, but Ebola was just as virulent then as it is now. Modern society intervened,

Ebola hasn't changed, according to research I've seen.

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Response to catbyte (Reply #82)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:58 AM

89. I believe it has

Here is a lecture I watched recently. I still am not worried about it here.
http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=view_post&forum=1002&pid=5685607

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Response to catbyte (Reply #38)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:54 AM

88. It seems to be more virulent than before

according to a Canadian study where they infected macaques. Perhaps that is the reason for the change? I am not worried about it here but I am really concerned that enough people will not volunteer and that it will become endemic over there.

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Response to LisaL (Reply #3)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:12 AM

44. Yes, because of the cultural practices involving how the

corpses are handled in the affected African countries.

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Response to LisaL (Reply #3)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:28 PM

97. Are you tired of being wrong on this topic yet? nt

 

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:15 AM

14. The question for everybody at the end of the day, exposed or not exposed, is

Would you be willing to take that risk with yourself or your family?

I wouldn't and I hope someone wouldn't intentionally do something that would put me or my family in that situation.

Hell, I feel that way when my SIL brings her 5 vomiting, 102-degree temp running, plain old stomach bug-laden munchkins to family dinner! She says "It's only the stomach bug that's going around. It'll be gone in a few days even if you do catch it." For our 81yo father, it may not end up as 'just a stomach bug'. For all the parents there, it might be a few days off work -- paid or unpaid depending on what they do. For the kids, missing a field trip at school or having to retake a test and make up work.

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Response to woodsprite (Reply #14)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:18 AM

17. ebola doesnt have the mortality rate here that it does in africa

 

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #17)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:46 AM

23. At least at present. I'm hopeful that will remain so

Last edited Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:57 AM - Edit history (1)

Our facilities aren't overwhelmed, and we have sufficient high quality facilities to deal with very small numbers.

We also have had a few serum donors, who contributed to our good outcomes. The number of cases wouldn't need to get much larger to quickly out pace such donation

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Response to HereSince1628 (Reply #23)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:49 AM

25. i dont see why it would change - everyone that got ebloa here and got treated in time

 

here has survived - mr duncan would have survived if he wasnt brushed aside for lacking insurance

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #25)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:55 AM

29. IIRC one of the Nebraska cases was rescued from near death by a serum donation

from a Dr who had survived Ebola. I'm not sure if the two nurses received any antiserum

The number of such survivors is limited (although each survivor builds that pool) and if the number of cases was much bigger availability couldn't keep up.

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Response to HereSince1628 (Reply #29)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:00 AM

32. Yes, both nurses got plasma from survivors.

I believe Dr. Brantly donated to both of them.

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Response to LisaL (Reply #32)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:05 AM

37. Which makes the use of such plasma a significant difference

between the treatment for an average person in west Africa and in the US.

I hope and expect the US cases will remain small and that availability of limited resources continues to meet demand

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Response to HereSince1628 (Reply #37)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:10 AM

41. Exactly.

We had very few patients treated in the best hospitals.
I have no doubt that if we were to get a lot of patients, our survival rate would go downhill.

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Response to HereSince1628 (Reply #37)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:12 AM

75. They will. The US is not Africa

and whole families aren't crammed into one room houses with dirt floors and no sanitation.

Viruses know no borders, but contagion in the US will be limited by our sanitation infrastructure.

Where this disease will be the worst is likely India. I hope it doesn't travel there.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #75)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:22 AM

79. I agree that sanitation in the US significantly contributes to health

It's also true that in the US people who are seriously sick seek help. If you suspected someone you knew had Ebola that seems even more likely.

In most American homes there is a thermometer of one type or another for body temp. The onset of a 103 fever would take many people, perhaps most people with a known or suspected exposure to a person with Ebola to urgent care prior to the onset of vomiting and diarrhea, which is to say, prior to a time when the risk to spreading the infection is greatest.

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Response to HereSince1628 (Reply #29)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:12 AM

42. both nurses received patient plasma with antibodies

 

from Dr. Brantly.

Writebol also offered to donate to Vinson, but it was decided that she didn't need additional plasma. I'm happy to see Writebol as recovered to the point that she is able to donate.

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Response to magical thyme (Reply #42)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:14 AM

47. And Writebol was finally able to contribute. She donated to Dr. Spencer. :)

 

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Response to KMOD (Reply #47)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:17 AM

50. that's good news. :-)

 

I didn't know she had donated to Dr. Spencer. Happy she is doing so much better...

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:48 AM

68. There are people in every epidemic in history who did not become infected

and for various reasons which may have included frailty of health before infection, genetics, or environmental factors. Not every person in the nations affected in Africa gets ill with this disease either. And people survive it too. It is not unlike people being exposed to the flu. Some may get very ill with an influenza, others only mildy ill, and still others may not get ill at all. I think we need to learn more about ebola because I don't think that everything is understood about it. If we did have full knowledge of it, there would be a vaccine and a cure for it.

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:16 AM

78. And some people smoke cigarettes all their lives and don't get cancer. So what?

Anecdotal evidence of a handful of cases doesn't mean anything.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #78)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:28 AM

81. handfull? it's all of the cases we have here in the u.s.

 

and it's not so anecdotal since we have doctors to tell us that they are ebola negative.

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #81)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:41 AM

84. An African study showed that 16% of family members had gotten it. So that's not negligible.

Duncan's family was very lucky.

http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/179/Supplement_1/S87.full

The surviving members of 27 households in which someone had been infected with Ebola virus were interviewed in order to define the modes of transmission of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF). Of 173 household contacts of the primary cases, 28 (16%) developed EHF. All secondary cases had direct physical contact with the ill person (rate ratio [RR], undefined; P < .001), and among those with direct contact, exposure to body fluids conferred additional risk (RR, 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9–6.8).

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:03 AM

4. Ohs no!!!!!1!

 

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Response to notrightatall (Reply #4)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:05 AM

6. yea really - duct tape your windows and wear a garbage bag

 

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #6)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:10 AM

9. But how do I go to the store?

 

If I go out I might get bengaz.....I mean Ebola !!!

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Response to notrightatall (Reply #9)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:10 AM

10. you'll be ok- you'll have to wrap yourself up like a mummy

 

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Response to notrightatall (Reply #9)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:28 AM

19. No, that's "Obamla".

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Response to riqster (Reply #19)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:17 AM

49. No, Oh-bola! Yodeled like Ri-cola for coughs. Gotta keep up with the slurs. n/t

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Response to freshwest (Reply #49)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:39 AM

64. I skipped my Remedial Teabaggerisms class this week.

That'll teach me to flick classes.

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Response to freshwest (Reply #49)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:52 AM

70. Oh, I thought it was sung to the tune of "Lola"-- E-B-O-L-A BOLA. (my bad) nt

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Response to Stardust (Reply #70)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:33 AM

83. rocky mountain mike from the stephanie miller show did a song parody of lola/ebola

 

i think he is on facebook under rocky mountain mike -

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #83)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:51 AM

87. Thanks--I'll check it out!

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Response to belzabubba333 (Reply #6)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:23 AM

55. But you have to poke a hole in the bag for air. To 'avoid suffocation,' the bag says. Then what?

Last edited Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:30 AM - Edit history (1)

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Response to notrightatall (Reply #4)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:14 AM

76. I'm going straight to hell for this....

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Response to Travelman (Reply #76)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:50 PM

95. I think you may have scored a point or two with Him with this.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:04 AM

5. read the op read my response and you should be able to connect the dots

 

if you cant then i cant help you

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:07 AM

7. Your OP is incomplete & thus misleading. It can be spread by a SYMPTOMATIC cough or sneeze.

 

There would have to be enough viral load in a person's system.

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Response to KittyWampus (Reply #7)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:13 AM

12. Stop with the science crap!!!

 

This is a PANIC situation !!1!!

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Response to KittyWampus (Reply #7)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:17 AM

16. The point is that it's not airborne.

Yes, it can be spread through droplets IF those droplets make it into the mouth, nose or eyes of someone else.

In other words, if you haven't been caring for a person who is ill and if you are wearing protective gear, it's unlikely that you will catch it.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:13 AM

13. Exaggerated and incomplete.

[IMG][/IMG] [IMG][/IMG] [IMG][/IMG] [IMG][/IMG]

The info sheet specifically says that Ebola is not transmitted via an airborne route. The droplets would have to land at very close range and directly onto a mucus membrane.

Note to all Panic Platoon members: Contact the burn unit to get treatment for those scalp burns.

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Response to riqster (Reply #13)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:48 AM

24. More of the "I am not a scientist", but......I want to pretend to be one because of my fear.

Ludicrous.

Why are there so many science deniers and fear lovers at DU?

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Response to Fred Sanders (Reply #24)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:55 AM

30. Fear is a far more transmissible disease than Ebola.

Pretty damned deadly, too, in its way.

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Response to riqster (Reply #30)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:25 AM

57. Tied straight into that reptilian reflex and survival mechanism. Works perfectly.

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Response to Fred Sanders (Reply #24)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:12 AM

43. I posted a link to a CDC publication. nt

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Reply #43)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:37 AM

63. Yes you did. And your OP did not accurately reflect it.

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Response to riqster (Reply #63)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:46 AM

66. How so?

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Reply #66)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:08 AM

73. I'm not sure, why they say that

the new CDC guidance on risk says droplet transmission is low risk when outside of 3 feet

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:16 AM

15. True, but you're probably going to be able to see signs that a person

who has enough viral load to transmit it in such a way is really ill.

(And, btw, in medical parlance, the only person who can see 'symptoms' is the person with the illness. 'Signs' are the objective, observable, and measurable effects that caregivers can see, 'symptoms' are the subjective feelings that only the sick person knows. This is why doctors and nurses ask you what your symptoms are - they have no way to know your symptoms, but they can observe and measure the 'signs' of your problem. If you're in pain, you can experience the symptom of pain, while your caregiver might notice signs indicating that you're in pain, such as you groaning or grimacing. Everybody keeps talking about 'symptomatic' patients, but only the patient themselves can tell if they're 'symptomatic'. High temperatures, emesis, etc, are 'signs'.)

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:26 AM

18. Calm down, Nuke. Theoretically it possibly could spread that way, but...

But those drops would have to encounter a wound or other receptive site on the body. Influenza actually is spread with every breath we exhale and inhale. Has nothing to do with "drops", which don't travel through the air very far before landing on the floor because of their weight.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:28 AM

20. LESS THAN THREE FEET IN DISTANCE. Please clarify, this is not AIRBORNE transmission. n/y

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:34 AM

21. Maybe if they sneeze right on you and it gets into your eyes, nose or mouth.

And of course they would have had to be in a stage where they are shedding viruses. Ebola patients in that stage are not walking around sneezing on people.

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Response to yellowcanine (Reply #21)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:27 AM

59. Plenty of healthcare professionals are being infected without having patients sneezing on their eyes

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Reply #59)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:45 AM

65. No kidding, the question was about getting Ebola from sneezing. Pay attention.

How did you get from there to "the only way to get Ebola is to have someone sneeze into your eyes." Confused much?

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:44 AM

22. Thank you for the information, Nuclear Unicorn.

I wonder why it bothers some DUers so much? Doesn't public safety, like democracy itself, require knowledge?

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Response to Octafish (Reply #22)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:53 AM

26. It requires detailed and complete knowledge.

The CDC doc linked makes it plain that actual contact with bodily fluids is STILL required to catch Ebola.

This is old information, rephrased and incomplete. Gives a mistaken impression. OP needs detail added.

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Response to riqster (Reply #26)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:09 AM

40. Thanks for the added detail.

Having worked in a hospital, I was sneezed on, on occassion.

Having ridden public transportation, I was sneezed on a lot.

That's why I cover my mouth when I sneeze.

I wonder how many people don't? A lot, I've seen.

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Response to Octafish (Reply #40)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:49 AM

69. Yeah, I spent a lot of years in the medical biz, too.

And am likewise cautious. More people should cover up and use other basic precautions like you do.

Flu is a good example of a serious and deadly disease that is transmitted by air when someone sneezes. Ebola is not: it requires actual droplet-membrane contact.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:54 AM

28. a.... ccchhewwww.

 

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:56 AM

31. It can also be spread via the dirty sanchez

 

FYI

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:01 AM

33. I find it quite bizarre that the

 

information page from the CDC makes it sound as if Ebola is spread as easily as a cold or the flu. Here's another CDC page which makes it a bit more clear just how you get Ebola: http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/infographic.pdf

In the end, you can only get Ebola if you have the misfortune to be in fairly close contact with a very sick, symptomatic patient. Isn't ANYBODY out there paying any attention to the fact that none of Duncan's housemates got sick? Or that none of the patients or medical staff in the ER where he twice went while symptomatic got sick?

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:02 AM

34. knew this already.

Ebola concentrates in the lungs. When it was first talked about in the news, years ago, it was often described by how it caused the lungs to hemorrhage.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:04 AM

35. Every person around you this season will be spreading

something mainly the flu. But the again I'd worry about pertussis, so far its killing more than ebola.

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Response to Historic NY (Reply #35)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:05 AM

36. And the flu will kill many more people than ebola

but people are all worried about ebola and can't be bothered to get a flu shot.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:09 AM

39. Explained Properly Here

From:
http://commonhealth.wbur.org/2014/10/reality-check-how-catch-ebola

A question/answer session with an actual Ebola expert. Dr. Elka Muhlberger. I recommend reading the whole thing before posting panicked bits and pieces of hysteria.

Some people are claiming that to infect so many people, the virus must have moved from just bodily fluids to “airborne”…

I think there’s some confusion here. We know that some viruses — like influenza virus, and measles — are transmitted before the patient shows symptoms. Especially the measles virus, which is the winner in terms of being contagious. What these viruses do is infect the respiratory tract — that is their first target organ. That’s how they start the infection, and then they replicate or amplify themselves in cells of the upper respiratory tract. And then when we breathe, we release these viruses because they’re part of our ‘breathing air.’ There are tiny, tiny, tiny little droplets, and these droplets contain the virus. They can stretch pretty far, like a couple of feet. And that is what we call an airborne infection. If we breathe and then we shed virus with our breath.

So you don’t even need visible droplets, it’s just air?

They’re tiny little droplets in our breath. And these viral particles are part of it. This is completely different from Ebola virus. First of all, Ebola virus does not begin an infection by infecting our upper respiratory tract. The route of infection starts with little lesions in our skin, and then the virus gets in our skin, and then in our blood system, and then in these immune cells I mentioned before, which are the primary target cells. It’s also able to get into our eyes and mucosal membranes, but it does not infect the cells which we need to get infected to have an infection be airborne. Late in the infection, when the Ebola virus patients have very high viral loads, they are really really ill, way too ill to get on a train and sit there.

So you’re saying that when they’re so ill that it could be in the respiratory system, they’re super-ill, not able to go anywhere?

Exactly. The cells in the lung can be infected by Ebola virus but really late in the infection. That’s very important. As far as we know, the infection starts with the immune cells — for those who know a little more about the immune system, it’s dendritic cells and macrophages. Then it goes to lymph nodes. Then very quickly to the liver, and there it goes crazy. The liver is very crucial in Ebola virus infections because it is so heavily affected. Ebola virus also spreads to the spleen, to other organs, and then later in infection it tends to infect the cells that coat the blood vessels, and of course we have these cells in the lung as well.

So when we are infected with Ebola virus and we are really sick, then we spread the virus through all our body fluids, which includes blood, sputum, feces urine, breast milk and semen. Again, then we have Ebola virus in little droplets, which is the reason we talk about infection via droplets, but these droplets are much bigger — though they are tiny, of course — but these are much bigger than the droplets which cause aerosol-borne disease. So it’s a matter of size. And if they are bigger they cannot be transmitted over a large distance.

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Response to sharp_stick (Reply #39)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:15 AM

48. exactly. The virus doesn't infect the entire body until very late stage, when the

 

entire immune system is broken down.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:12 AM

45. But that does not make it airborne

Airborne means that the virus can continue to travel in the air for a period of time after leaving the host.

In advance stages of Ebola, all the fluid coming out of an infected patient is teaming with Ebola virus which would include blood, puke, tears, sweat, urine, feces and yes phlegm from coughing and/or sneezing.

The link even says that Ebola is not airborne.

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Response to LynneSin (Reply #45)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:21 AM

53. Reading links is a good thing.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:14 AM

46. only after the patient is symptomatic, and it would be in the later stages of the disease

 

when the virus is taking over all the systems, as opposed to early on when it is concentrated in blood and liver.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:17 AM

51. I'm hiding under my desk with my bleach aerosol right now!

 

Would somebody please let me know when the ebola zombie apocalypse is over?

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Response to Warren Stupidity (Reply #51)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:24 AM

56. i know. it was duct tape. we need to just start handing out bleach aerosol. cha..ching.

 

you are brilliant.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:21 AM

52. This is not a respiratory virus.

How often do you sneeze or cough if you don't have a respiratory virus?

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:22 AM

54. Yet another unwarranted panic post.

No! Ebola is not airborne transmissible. And it infects the bloodstream, but not the lungs.

Yet another hair-on-fire Ebola post.

Sheesh!

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:25 AM

58. Relax

My husband just read this to me from a football forum he is on. It was from the Drudge report, I also found it on the New York Post.

Lay people interpreting medical information, especially with the intention of causing panic, disruption or paranoia should not be listened to.

This is not news nor is it any different than anything they have said before. It is just being blown into the air like little droplets (sorry, I can't help myself) to cause everyone to panic and not forget we could ALL DIE if we do not elect tough leaders (i.e. those we are not exactly prone to vote for here).

Worry about the flu, really.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:29 AM

60. Theorectically. But not practically. And not ever in reality for patients with no or early symptoms.

 

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:29 AM

61. yeah your

link says the person has to be less than 3 feet from you and coughs or sneezes in your face. Good thing Coughing and sneezing are not symptoms of the Ebola.

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/symptoms/index.html

•Fever
•Severe headache
•Muscle pain
•Weakness
•Diarrhea
•Vomiting
•Abdominal (stomach) pain
•Unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising)

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:36 AM

62. Well then keep clear of the one or two Ebola patients

in the country at any one time. Meanwhile you could get hit by a car tonight. There is a much better chance of that.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:47 AM

67. And it can only be spread by people who

are infected.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 10:58 AM

71. duh.

Better safe than sorry!

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:06 AM

72. Fear mongering, Nuke.

Did you know you can get herpes from a toilet seat?

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Response to Feral Child (Reply #72)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 09:52 PM

96. Double nuke.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:14 AM

77. When was the last time a stranger sneezed/coughed in your face? n/t

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Response to SoCalDem (Reply #77)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 12:31 PM

93. Sunday, in a restaurant. Not a rare event in a city.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 11:44 AM

86. Ebola doesn't make you sneeze. This is ridiculous

it's not a respiratory illness. The chances of anyone getting it from someone sneezing is about zero.

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Response to Beaverhausen (Reply #86)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 12:27 PM

91. Tons of other things make people sneeze of course.

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Original post)

Thu Oct 30, 2014, 12:28 PM

92. Yep - something to consider for sure.

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