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Tue Jul 14, 2015, 12:17 AM

The international war on LGBT people

As Americans gathered in cities across the country to celebrate the legalization of same-sex marriage, several thousand Turks also tried to march in support of rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

Police in Istanbul attacked them with water cannons and rubber pellets. The repression reflected the narrowing of freedom under President Recep Tayyip Erdogan; in past years, Turkey was the site of the largest gay pride marches in the Muslim world.

But Turkey is hardly alone in vilifying, isolating and threatening LGBT people. While 25 countries and territories now allow gay marriage, 75 nations treat homosexual behavior as a crime.

In 10 countries, it is punishable by death — and even where it is not, just being gay is often fatal. A May U.N. report found “continuing, serious and widespread human rights violations perpetrated, too often with impunity, against individuals based on their sexual orientation and gender identity.”

“Since 2011, hundreds of people have been killed and thousands more injured in brutal, violent attacks,” the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights reported.

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mahatmakanejeeves

19 replies, 1169 views

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Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply The international war on LGBT people (Original post)
Behind the Aegis Jul 2015 OP
Hydra Jul 2015 #1
Behind the Aegis Jul 2015 #2
brer cat Jul 2015 #5
Bluenorthwest Jul 2015 #16
Skittles Jul 2015 #3
cwydro Jul 2015 #17
Heidi Jul 2015 #4
eridani Jul 2015 #6
951-Riverside Jul 2015 #7
Behind the Aegis Jul 2015 #10
951-Riverside Jul 2015 #11
Behind the Aegis Jul 2015 #13
NuclearDem Jul 2015 #19
beam me up scottie Jul 2015 #8
davidpdx Jul 2015 #9
msongs Jul 2015 #12
sheshe2 Jul 2015 #14
damnedifIknow Jul 2015 #15
stevenleser Jul 2015 #18

Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 12:21 AM

1. The march for freedom continues

And so do the bullets- rubber ones this time.

We're not even done here in the US, but the SCOTUS is a huge step.

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Response to Hydra (Reply #1)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 12:30 AM

2. Very true.

There is still much to be done in the US, without a doubt. I feel too many think the marriage equality win was the be-all-to-end-all for gay equality...it wasn't; it is simply one more layer of street leading us to equality. What I am finding interesting are the countries backsliding on GLBT issues, such as Turkey and Russia, and what those movements could have in store for LGBT people, not only in those countries, but in other countries where inroads have been made in GLBT equality. Sadly, many places are backsliding (or getting worse) because of American influence from the obsessed right-wing, fundamentalist groups exporting their "crazy" to other places.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Reply #2)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:16 AM

5. I have concerns regarding TPP

and GLBT issues. I am not automatically opposed to TPP, but the inclusion of Brunei is especially troubling. The priority of American foreign policy should be on protecting human rights, and Brunei's Sharia penal system is barbaric. I don't see how we can negotiate trade deals with such countries and still have a credible voice on GLBT abuses.

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Response to brer cat (Reply #5)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 09:55 AM

16. And while LGBT groups have been lobbying madly about TPP during the entire process, DU has

 

openly rejected any discussion of human rights concerns around TPP in favor of lots of statistics about potential job loss and dense rhetoric about national sovereignty. It is very sad, because while both areas of concern are important, the human rights issues are easily communicated and contain clear moral arguments.
The whole 'Civil rights do not matter, only economics matter' mindset on DU caused DU to forgo all of the most effective arguments against the TPP.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 12:34 AM

3. still a lot of work to be done

yes indeed

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Response to Skittles (Reply #3)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 10:12 AM

17. Yup.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:13 AM

4. Kick, kick, kick!

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:19 AM

6. While we celebrate here, we need reminders that civil rights in one country are not enough n/t

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:26 AM

7. Yet Apple which is headed up by a Gay man does business with a country that execute gays

 

Saudi Arabia: http://9to5mac.com/2014/05/21/apple-cleared-to-operate-and-market-products-in-saudi-arabia/

and Brunei which adopted an interpretation of Sharia law that calls for execution of gays: http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/01/world/asia/brunei-sharia-law/




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Response to 951-Riverside (Reply #7)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:43 AM

10. And?

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Reply #10)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:48 AM

11. Are you suggesting that doing business with countries that execute gays is no big deal?

 

I'm just trying to figure out what you're getting at here with your "And?" response.

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Response to 951-Riverside (Reply #11)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:58 AM

13. Are you suggesting one gay man doing business negates the article?

I am just trying to figure out what the relevance of using a gay man as an example has to do with the article, especially given you said nothing about the article.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Reply #10)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 11:42 AM

19. CHECKMATE

 

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:28 AM

8. A timely reminder that the fight is far from over.

What’s the right way to think about this global dichotomy? Overseas practitioners of bigotry sometimes plead for cultural or religious understanding: Just as they don’t tell us how to run our country, they say, we should show respect for their traditions. Of course killing transgender people is wrong, they might argue, but why should they be forced to legalize practices they find offensive?

You can hear similar arguments in defense of genital cutting, banning women from driving or keeping people with mental disabilities hidden away.

The appeal to a sense of tolerance may stop you for a moment, especially if you are loath to proclaim one faith or way of life superior to another.

But it shouldn’t stop you for long. Nations are entitled to organize themselves as they wish, but not at the expense of fundamental human rights.


Thanks for posting this, BtA.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:37 AM

9. South Korea is still very conservative and has a long way to go before gays are accepted

There was a whole battle over trying to get permits for the parade last month and conservatives were applying for permits on the same day to prevent it. The police ended up telling the gay pride parade organizers no and it went before a judge and was reversed. I saw an article in an online newspaper/blog (not sure what to call it) that did an interview with one of these conservative pastors here in Korea and reading it made me want to hurl.

It seems there is still a fair amount of censorship in terms of certain subjects unless of course you are a conservative. I really have to bite my tongue not to tell Koreans how much it pisses me off. Even though I have residency, I still have to mind my manners a bit.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 01:53 AM

12. religion marches onwards, forward into the past. hallelujah nt

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 03:12 AM

14. Late, gotta go. KnR.

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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 08:38 AM

15. Human beings can be an extremely ignorant species

Maybe we should let these guys run things for a bit and see how it goes:


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Response to Behind the Aegis (Original post)

Tue Jul 14, 2015, 10:47 AM

18. K&R. Lots of battles to fight. nt

 

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