HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » I will try again! How com...

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 04:04 AM

I will try again! How come the politicians only care about the middle class

but not the working class? The working class people have to work two or more jobs to put food on the table. That should not be in America. The most rich and powerful country on earth!

15 replies, 3389 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread

Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 04:10 AM

1. I don't think that Bernie Sanders only cares about the middle class. He talks about working people

 

all the time. Now I know, these days "working people" of all income levels may not be finding work or working, but "working people" is the accepted term for people earning less than the middle class.

Anyway, I know he's looking out for that too. Hence things like the "living wage" and so on.

When you read him or hear him speak, isn't that what you get too?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 04:11 AM

2. I think when people say they want to help the middle class they usually mean they want to grow

it. That includes the poor because in a growing middle class will be some formerly working class and wages will rise and opportunity. That is what I mean when I say middle class.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 04:15 AM

3. Because a lot of people think they are middle class

Many aren't, but they think they are because they have one job, a house, a car, and insurance. They don't get to go on vacation though because there is no budget, they have no savings because they make just enough to keep food on the table and gas in the car no one is starving though, a few disasters like a car break down and huge medical expenses can literally put them in the poor house.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kalidurga (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 07:35 AM

7. My mom took vacations growing up

They would pile in the car and drive to a national park, where they would either sleep in the car or rent a cabin. And they were definitely middle class. People could still do that, but the expectation of what a "vacation" should be like has gone up.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #7)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 07:59 AM

9. I have to say I agree with you on this. Expectations in general have

gone up. Expectations of how big one's house should be, how much money to spend on the kids' proms, etc.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to raccoon (Reply #9)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 08:28 AM

10. Economists always regarded the middle class as fairly

affluent comparatively, able to hire working class help around the house, for instance. Professional-level workers, like physicians and attorneys, were middle class.

With improvements in wellbeing, availability of affordable clothes off the rack,etc., guaranteed paid vacation time, etc., more leisure rime due to mechanization, the freedom afforded by a car in every garage, more access to amenities, -- and greater education attainment -- more and more working class people FEEL middle class.

I agree with the peoples' own definition. We haven't been in the 19th century for a very long change now. Many experts now use income, others lifestyle also. I agree with both.

The middle classes to my mind are a broad range between those who lack reliable provision for current and future needs at a basic level, with little or no disposable income left over, and those whose wealth frees them permanently from the need to work while maintaining a very high standard of living. Those lifestyle factors can be important also, tho, like level of education, adding complexity.

Pew puts it around $47,000 - $140,000 in dollar terms.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #7)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 09:02 AM

12. My parent's mortgage was $93.00 a month. Mine is not.

 

You parents life sounds nostalgic but not much like your own life.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #12)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 09:12 AM

13. My mom's is pretty nostalgic; my dad's not at all

Though my dad's mortgage still isn't much more than your parents', because he now lives in a tiny Mississippi town.

But,the kind of vacations my mom took as a middle class little girl are still affordable to most Americans.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 04:40 AM

4. To repeat from the earlier thread

The pitches are aimed at who is more likely to turn out.

If someone is working the two or three jobs, they "don't have time" to go vote. They also probably don't have a car to conveniently take them to the polls.

I was lucky when I was a grad student because I lived five blocks from the polling place. Later on, starting working before becoming car-owned, the connector bus at the subway went right by the place.

In the DC area, getting from point A to B can be very challenging without a car. Even in the areas that take pride in their bus routes, it's usually two bus rides (or subway plus bus) to get from, let's say work, to the polling place (often a school), and then one is faced with getting home after rush-hour service has often quit. The alternative is walking to the school/etc in time for polls to open, then somehow make it to work on time.

((In Virginia, one can apply for an absentee ballot, but that takes time and effort.))

Thus the propensity of many candidates to focus on the car-owned and their fears, such as "Will me or my kids ever be able to afford college?".

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 04:50 AM

5. Actually, it's even more precarious for the marginal workers

I volunteer at a tax assistance program. Some of them come in with evidence of five or more jobs (a couple of W2s, three (or more) 1099s,) plus estimates of cash income.

The lower earners often work part-time in the back (or front) of restaurants, doing the grunt work at car dealers, etc. If a business has a slump, guess who gets laid off first. So the helpers have to see if a client got unemployment payments...

And to see if ex-students are still living with/off parent(s), etc.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 05:45 AM

6. Because the elites have always managed to fool working class people that

they were 'blue collar' not working class. Neo-liberalism has shattered that myth as social mobility has vanished.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 07:55 AM

8. With the possible exception of Bernie...

... none of them give a shit about the middle OR working classes so I wouldn't get too worried about it.

Or at the very least their concern ends with the election.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 08:50 AM

11. The working class generally wants to be middle class

 

Economically, that's the next step up - and who wouldn't want to be in a better economic position?

Other than the elites, everyone is either in the middle class or wants to be.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 11:50 AM

14. Working class, middle class, what's the difference? We're all 99 percenters. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to akbacchus_BC (Original post)

Sun Apr 3, 2016, 01:40 PM

15. Nobody wants to consider themselves working class even though they are.

Our culture's malignant Social-Darwinist mindset meaning calling oneself working class would be an admission of being a "lazy taker". There is also a racial aspect to this, ever since Reagan's demonization of "welfare queems" the image of poverty has been racialized.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread