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Sat Jan 7, 2017, 10:24 AM

What political books are an absolute must-read for DUers?

The Shock Doctrine (Naomi Klein)

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Reply What political books are an absolute must-read for DUers? (Original post)
milestogo Jan 2017 OP
Girard442 Jan 2017 #1
Chipper Chat Jan 2017 #2
Dave Starsky Jan 2017 #34
Chipper Chat Jan 2017 #37
CivicGrief Jan 2017 #3
SecularMotion Jan 2017 #4
Kilgore Jan 2017 #5
hunter Jan 2017 #39
Kilgore Jan 2017 #41
Paladin Jan 2017 #6
CivicGrief Jan 2017 #14
Paladin Jan 2017 #16
Nay Jan 2017 #7
PatSeg Jan 2017 #32
Mendocino Jan 2017 #8
burrowowl Jan 2017 #24
FarCenter Jan 2017 #9
hunter Jan 2017 #40
milestogo Jan 2017 #10
milestogo Jan 2017 #11
yurbud Jan 2017 #12
yurbud Jan 2017 #13
First Speaker Jan 2017 #15
milestogo Jan 2017 #17
Stuart G Jan 2017 #18
Warpy Jan 2017 #26
Atticus Jan 2017 #19
Atticus Jan 2017 #20
TheBlackAdder Jan 2017 #21
malaise Jan 2017 #22
milestogo Jan 2017 #23
Danmel Jan 2017 #25
rurallib Jan 2017 #27
Vinca Jan 2017 #28
crazycatlady Jan 2017 #30
PatSeg Jan 2017 #33
dumbcat Jan 2017 #29
milestogo Jan 2017 #36
RedWedge Jan 2017 #31
milestogo Jan 2017 #38
zagamet Jan 2017 #35
canetoad Jan 2017 #42

Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 10:35 AM

1. The Handmaid's Tale

Probably should pour yourself a drink first.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 10:50 AM

2. The Ugly American

by Eugene Burdick

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Response to Chipper Chat (Reply #2)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 10:08 AM

34. And William J. Lederer n/t

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Response to Dave Starsky (Reply #34)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 11:29 AM

37. Thx

I couldn't remember Lederer's first name.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 10:52 AM

3. The Souls of Black Folk - W.E.B. Du Bois (eom)

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 10:56 AM

4. The Republican Noise Machine - David Brock

 

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 11:04 AM

5. The Art Of the Deal

Seriously, it gave much more of an insight into his thinking than any thing else i have read

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Response to Kilgore (Reply #5)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 01:35 PM

39. Trump didn't write it, and he probably didn't read it.

It's just one writer's perspective on Trump.

I can imagine Trump sitting impatiently with the writer, "Yeah, yeah, blah blah, sounds good, get to the next part..."

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Response to hunter (Reply #39)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 02:28 PM

41. Irregardless, it still does a better job

explaining his actions than anything else I have seen

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 11:22 AM

6. "The Peculiar Institution" by Kenneth Stampp (1956)

Yes, Stampp's study of slavery in the American South has been around for a while; it was an established classic when I read it as a college freshman, decades ago. I regard it as important reading for the way it strips away and negates the sort of neo-confederate myths that still are regarded as truths by way too many people in this country. It has had a lasting, positive impact on me, and I cannot recommend it highly enough.

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Response to Paladin (Reply #6)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 04:42 PM

14. Added to my wish list

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Response to CivicGrief (Reply #14)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 04:48 PM

16. Great. Hope it affects you as it did me. (nt)

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 11:29 AM

7. Confessions of an Economic Hitman -- John Perkins. In the Garden of the Beasts --

Erik Larson.

Also, an excellent memoir of Hitler's rise: Defying Hitler: A Memoir -- Sebastian Haffner

Haffner's memoir is the most relevant to us today.

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Response to Nay (Reply #7)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 09:42 AM

32. "In the Garden of the Beasts"

gave me such a clear picture of what happened in 1930s Germany. I highly recommend it. I heard that Tom Hanks bought the movie rights to the book and may play the U.S. ambassador.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 11:42 AM

8. The Truth by Al Franken

Howard Zinn- A Peoples History of the United States





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Response to Mendocino (Reply #8)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 02:31 AM

24. Amen!!!!!!!!

and The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich!
Hannah Arendt.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 12:37 PM

9. World Order by Henry Kissinger

 

He seems to be influential with Trump. May be predictive of how the next administration will view foreign policy.

I'm mostly through it. It is interesting, but he takes the Peace of Westphalia way to seriously.

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Response to FarCenter (Reply #9)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 01:46 PM

40. Maybe the reason politicians seem so peculiarly respectful of Kissinger...

... is that they believe he stood between angry drunk Nixon and all-out nuclear war.

It may be too much to hope for, but maybe some sane person in the Trump Administration will break Trump's tiny thumbs and assign the tweeting to staff.

If this happens the mainstream media won't say a thing, they'll just make up some nonsense about Trump maturing into the job.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 02:23 PM

10. The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt (1951)

Arendt's first major book was titled The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951), which traced the roots of Stalinism and Nazism in both antisemitism and imperialism. In it, Arendt argues that totalitarianism was a "novel form of government," different from other forms of tyranny in that it applied terror to subjugate mass populations rather than just political adversaries.[25] The book was opposed by some on the Left on the grounds that it presented the two movements as equally tyrannical. She further contends that Jewry was not the operative factor in the Holocaust, but merely a convenient proxy. Totalitarianism in Germany was, in the end, about terror and consistency, not eradicating Jews only.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 04:09 PM

11. Thanks for the recommendations, hoping for more.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 04:13 PM

12. THE PRIZE by Daniel Yergin, a Pulitzer Prize winning history of oil

I had read that right before 9/11, and it made everything that happened after seem like surreal bullshit.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 04:16 PM

13. OVERTHROW by Stephen Kinzer. history of foreign gov'ts US overthrew from Hawaii forward

You get a couple of chapters in and realize all our military and covert interventions are about making the already rich a lot richer or protecting them from paying higher wages or being subject to the rule of law in other countries.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 04:45 PM

15. Alan Bullock's *Hitler*...

...still the best book on the subject, and indispensable to understanding how the world really works--what it's capable of. Also--anything you can find by Mencken, Orwell, Dwight MacDonald, Hunter Thompson, and oh geez, a million others...

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Response to First Speaker (Reply #15)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 04:48 PM

17. Thank you.

You should make a post sometime with all your recommendations. I'm interested to hear more.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 05:02 PM

18. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair ..

Originally an economic critique, but it revolutionized politics and brought about government regulation of food and the processing of food....(Food and Drug Administration)..1906...T Roosevelt, President at the time, gave up eating meat when this was published..(as did most of the country)

Must read for those interested in deregulating everything. It was the stock yards in Chicago about 1900.......

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #18)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 02:58 AM

26. It also indirectly inspired housing mortgage reform as part of the New Deal

since the shenanigans of the bankers produced balloon payment mortgages that were a glorified rental scheme since those mortgages had to be renegotiated every time the balloon payments kicked in. Few people were able to save enough to purchase a house outright and that was about the only alternative.

"The Jungle" did more to inspire the New Deal than any other book out there.

"The Grapes of Wrath" is another good read, documenting how people were forced off their land in favor of mechanized Agribusiness and set adrift across the country, landless, jobless and hopeless. Yes, the Joads look like caricatures now, but they weren't back then, they were honest, churchgoing people who lived as decently as they could afford until the collision of the Dust Bowl, mechanization, and predatory banking combined to destroy their lives. And don't we know all about those last two.

Both books are great reads.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 05:03 PM

19. A People's History of the United States---Howard Zinn nt

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 05:06 PM

20. Justice---Michael J. Sandel nt

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 06:05 PM

21. F.A. Hayek's "The Road to Serfdom," Buckley's "God and Man at Yale" show how F-ed New Reps are.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sat Jan 7, 2017, 06:12 PM

22. The Constitution of Imperium by Ronnie D. Lipschutz

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 02:20 AM

23. kick

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 02:43 AM

25. The Plot Against America

By Philip Roth

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 08:19 AM

27. Marking to return to - got to see other recs for books

hope this gets tons of responses.

For me "The Conscience Of A Liberal" by Paul Krugman. Really woke me up to the RW as a long standing and amoral movement, not a political party

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 08:23 AM

28. If you can stomach reading about the Manbaby, David Cay Johnston's book -

"The Making of Donald Trump." He's been studying the con artist for decades.

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Response to Vinca (Reply #28)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 09:33 AM

30. I'm on the waiting list for that one

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Response to Vinca (Reply #28)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 09:48 AM

33. I read that shortly after it came out

It should be required reading for every eligible voter.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 09:17 AM

29. Some won't like this, but Atlas Shrugged

You really need to see the world from their warped viewpoint to understand how the Trump got to where he is. It would probably be the hardest thing you have ever read, but is required to know thine enemy. It would help you to understand Ryan and many other con leaders.

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Response to dumbcat (Reply #29)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 10:56 AM

36. Milton Friedman - Capitalism and Freedom

is also important for understanding how we got here. Not as offensive as Ayn Rand, but very influential.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 09:40 AM

31. It Can't Happen Here, Sinclair Lewis; Outrageouts Acts and Everyday Rebellions, Gloria Steinem;

speeches of the Rev. Dr. MLK Jr.; The Half Has Never Been Told, Edward Baptist; etc.

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Response to RedWedge (Reply #31)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 01:28 PM

38. Thank you.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 10:28 AM

35. Primer on winning local

Man of the House - Tip O'Neill

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun Jan 8, 2017, 02:35 PM

42. From 1989

The original (and the best) - House of Cards by Michael Dobbs.

From the author's website:

The idea for a novel based around the dark political arts came to me shortly after the 1987 general election campaign, which had been particularly bruising. Margaret Thatcher won that election but made many enemies while doing so too many, I thought. It inspired me to begin work on a plot entirely fictional, of course to get rid of a Prime Minister. The book was dramatised by the BBC, and in the very week it was first broadcast Margaret was forced out of Downing Street. It seemed almost impossible, but she was gone. Fact had overtaken Fiction.
http://www.michaeldobbs.com/house-of-cards/

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