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Wed Jun 7, 2017, 04:33 PM

 

The Criminal's Use of Everyday Words ( Explains Donald?)

When a basically responsible person converses with a criminal, their frames of reference are completely different, and therefore it is as though they are conversing in different languages. Because criminals have a view of life that is radically different from people who are basically responsible, they use words differently from most people. Professionals working in corrections and law enforcement discover that words commonly encountered in daily conversation have a very different meaning when spoken by criminals.

When a criminal says he “trusts” someone, that is not a compliment. He means that he has a person under his control; the individual will go along with him or, at the very least, not interfere with one of his enterprises. Or he may mean that he counts on a person not to “snitch” or inform on him. This is very different from what most people mean when they speak of relying on someone with the integrity and ability to provide help, support, or comfort.

When a criminal says he has a “problem,” he usually means that he is in a jam created by his own irresponsibility and demands that someone remove that difficulty as quickly as possible. He may claim he needs “help” referring to having another person assist him in a criminal venture or avoid the unpalatable consequences of his own misconduct.

Having no concept of “loyalty,” criminals seldom use the word. When they do, it is referring to a person who will be an accomplice or someone who will do precisely what they want.

Criminals have no concept of “love.” When criminals speak of love, they are often referring to sex. They also use the word in a sentimental manner, perhaps with respect to their mother or their child. But they abuse the very individuals whom they claim to love. One man stole coins from his son’s piggy bank and spent it on drugs. Another promised to take his wife out for a romantic evening. He left her waiting at the door while he had a fling with a prostitute.

A person in a relationship with a criminal is likely to be angrily told, “You don’t understand.” That precipitates the individual engaging in a bit of reflection, if not soul searching, to figure out what he failed to comprehend. Whereas, of course, misunderstandings do occur, the criminal pounces on, “You don’t understand” and employs it as a weapon to put others on the defense. This is a tactical maneuver that takes the focus off the offender.

“I can’t” is another phrase often uttered by criminals. What this usually translates to is, “I won’t.” If one thinks about the phrase, it denotes incapacity. This is not usually the case for the boastful criminal who regards himself as omnipotent. “I can’t” constitutes a rejection of what is obligatory or necessary because it doesn’t fit in with his plans.

Boredom is experienced by most people as a kind of weariness due to tedium. A six hour drive on an interstate highway may become boring. Attending to a menial and routine task may be boring. When a criminal complains of boredom, this is an angry restless state in which he is deterred from doing what he finds exciting or forbidden. Excitement to a responsible person comes from a new experience, an extraordinary performance, or something dramatically out of the routine. For a criminal, excitement comes from the pursuit of a conquest, the exercise of power and control over other people.

“I got real paranoid” is another assertion one may hear. A criminal may appear paranoid in that he seems unduly suspicious and distrustful. Paranoia actually is a feature of a serious mental illness in which a person is suspicious irrationally, i.e. with no basis in reality. A criminal has good reason for being extremely suspicious because he has betrayed others and engaged in conduct that is irresponsible, if not illegal. People likely are looking to hold him accountable. There is no mental illness involved.

Even the word “police” has its idiosyncratic meaning. Most people use the term to refer to law enforcement officers. A criminal uses the word to refer to any person who checks up on him and holds him accountable. It could be a parent or a teacher.

The above provide examples of commonly used words to which the criminal imparts an idiosyncratic meaning. It is a meaning very different from what a responsible person intends to convey using the exact same words. In their interactions with criminals, responsible people need to be aware of these semantic issues.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inside-the-criminal-mind/201706/the-criminals-use-everyday-words

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Reply The Criminal's Use of Everyday Words ( Explains Donald?) (Original post)
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 OP
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #1
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #2
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #3
lunatica Jun 2017 #5
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #7
furtheradu Jun 2017 #4
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #8
smirkymonkey Jun 2017 #6
raccoon Jun 2017 #9
DefenseLawyer Jun 2017 #10
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #11
DefenseLawyer Jun 2017 #13
Blue_Roses Jun 2017 #15
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #16
DefenseLawyer Jun 2017 #17
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #18
DefenseLawyer Jun 2017 #19
Madam45for2923 Jun 2017 #20
malaise Jun 2017 #12
Blue_Roses Jun 2017 #14

Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 04:34 PM

1. When a criminal says he trusts someone, that is not a compliment. He means that he has a person un

 

When a criminal says he “trusts” someone, that is not a compliment. He means that he has a person under his control; the individual will go along with him or, at the very least, not interfere with one of his enterprises. Or he may mean that he counts on a person not to “snitch” or inform on him. This is very different from what most people mean when they speak of relying on someone with the integrity and ability to provide help, support, or comfort.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inside-the-criminal-mind/201706/the-criminals-use-everyday-words

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 04:36 PM

2. Author: Stanton E. Samenow Ph.D. Dr. Stanton E. Samenow

 

Stanton E. Samenow Ph.D.
Dr. Stanton E. Samenow, Ph.D.
Stanton Samenow, Ph.D., received his B.A. (cum laude) from Yale University in 1963 and his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1968. After working as a clinical psychologist on adolescent inpatient psychiatric services in the Ann Arbor (Michigan) area, he joined the Program for the Investigation of Criminal Behavior at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, D.C. From 1970 until June, 1978, he was clinical research psychologist for that program. With the late Dr. Samuel Yochelson, he participated in the longest in-depth clinical research-treatment study of offenders that has been conducted in North America. The findings of that study are contained in the three volume publication The Criminal Personality (Lanham, Md.: Roman and Littlefield) that he co-authored with Dr. Yochelson.

In 1978, Dr. Samenow entered the private practice of clinical psychology in Alexandria, Virginia. His specialty has continued to be the evaluation and treatment of juvenile and adult offenders. Dr. Samenow has delivered lectures, training seminars, and workshops in 48 states, Canada, and England. These presentations have been to a variety of professional groups including mental health, law enforcement, corrections, education, social services, and the judiciary. He has served as a consultant and expert witness for a variety of courts and agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Dade County (Florida) Public Schools, Federal Bureau of Prisons, and the U.S. Office of Probation. In 1980, he was appointed by President Reagan to the Law Enforcement Task Force and in 1982 to the President's Task Force on Victims of Crime. In 1987, President Reagan appointed him as a Conferee to the White House Conference on a Drug-Free America.

Dr. Samenow's book Inside the Criminal Mind (NY: Times Books/ Random House) was originally published in 1984. A revised, updated edition was published in 2004 (NY: Crown Publishing/Random House). In 1999, a Japanese translation was published (Tokyo: Kodansha). In addition, he has authored numerous articles for professional publications and appeared frequently on national radio and television broadcasts, including 60 Minutes, The Phil Donahue Show, Good Morning America, The CBS Morning News, The Today Show and The Larry King Show. Straight Talk About Criminals, was published by Jason Aronson in April of 1998.

In March, 1989, Dr. Samenow's book about prevention of antisocial behavior was published. It is titled Before It's Too Late: Why Some Kids Get Into Trouble and What Parents Can Do About It (NY: Times Books/Random House). The book was revised and expanded in 1999. The book was published in Japan (by Kodansha), in Taiwan (by Life Potential Publishing Co.), and in Poland (Warsaw: Proszynski i S-ka). The paperback edition was published during November of 2001.

Dr. Samenow's book "The Myth of the Out of Character Crime" was published in 2007. A paperback edition was published in 2010.

In 1994, a three-part videotape and workbook featuring Dr. Samenow's work was released ("Commitment to Change: Overcoming Errors in Thinking" distributed by FMS productions, Carpinteria, California). The materials provide an interactive program for use with inmates, students or staff in mental health, corrections, substance abuse programs, and educational settings. Early in 2000, a second series of videotapes and workbooks was released regarding identifying and addressing "tactics" which antisocial juveniles and adults deploy obstructing effective communication. The third series, "The Power of Consequences," was released during late July of 2002. "Fear—The Anger Trigger" is a three part DVD series that was released in 2010.

Dr. Samenow wrote a book based on his experience as an independent custody evaluator published in 2002. It is titled In the Best Interest of the Child: How to Protect Your Child from the Pain of Your Divorce.

Recently, Random House/Broadway has published in paperback Dr. Samenow's updated, revised Inside the Criminal Mind.


https://www.psychologytoday.com/experts/stanton-e-samenow-phd

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 04:40 PM

3. I posit that Donald is a criminal.

 

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Reply #3)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 04:53 PM

5. And I would say you hit the nail on the head

His every thought has to do with how he can make money out of the situation which also has the added element of power and all that connotes. He never thinks about how to do it legally. If he does think about the legality it means that for some reason he can't do it illegally.

Every face he sees is a sucker to him. Even the ones he surrounds himself with. People like Kelly Ann and Spicer and even his kids are just people to use. I'm willing to bet his wives are only there so he looks good.

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Response to lunatica (Reply #5)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 05:17 PM

7. & when he is asking for someone's loyalty (as in trust) it means -person's a sucker he conned good

 

So if you are a normal person you might get majorly uneasy feeling in the pit of your stomach that you may or may not listen to.

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 04:52 PM

4. Thank You for this.

Yeah, sounds like trump talk.

Makes my head hurt.
But goood info, thanks!

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Response to furtheradu (Reply #4)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 05:18 PM

8. Yeah, sounds like trump talk. -- Right? At it's most basic!

 

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 04:57 PM

6. Interesting article. I will be listening in a different way from

 

now on. Especially to republicans.

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 06:43 PM

9. Great article. Thanks for posting. nt

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 06:47 PM

10. As someone who has dealt with criminals for 25 years, this is a lot of nonsense

 

“KNOW YOUR DOPE FIEND. YOUR LIFE MAY DEPEND ON IT! You will not be able to see his eyes because of the Tea-Shades, but his knuckles will be white from inner tension and his pants will be crusted with semen from constantly jacking off when he can't find a rape victim. He will stagger and babble when questioned. He will not respect your badge. The Dope Fiend fears nothing. He will attack, for no reason, with every weapon at his command-including yours. BEWARE. Any officer apprehending a suspected marijuana addict should use all necessary force immediately. One stitch in time (on him) will usually save nine on you. Good luck.
-The Chief”


― Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

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Response to DefenseLawyer (Reply #10)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 07:39 PM

11. Geesh!

 

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Reply #11)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 07:54 PM

13. The is no such thing as a "criminal mind"

 

Would you assume that Bernie Maddoff, Richard Nixon, Jeffrey Dahmer, John Gotti and a shoplifter at the local Walmart are all of the same "mind"? The intelligence, mental health, motivations and linguistics of people that commit crimes is no more monolithic than, say, doctors. If you read an article explaining what all doctors think and how the "doctor's mind" works, wouldn't you think that was nonsense?

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Response to DefenseLawyer (Reply #13)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 08:03 PM

15. You're looking at it from a lawyer's

standpoint. This is from a mental health standpoint. As someone who has worked with mental health clients for over 20 years, much of this rings true.

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Response to DefenseLawyer (Reply #13)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 08:52 PM

16. I also posted info on the author, (2nd post I believe)

 

I think it shows more where they are coming from.

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Reply #16)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 09:02 PM

17. His source is "professionals working in corrections and law enforcement "

 

Cops and jailers, I know that's where I turn for wisdom about sociology and mental health, and an unbiased view of the accused. My opinion remains unchanged.

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Response to DefenseLawyer (Reply #17)

Thu Jun 8, 2017, 09:20 PM

18. Author's professional life is varied and long

 

Professionals working in corrections and law enforcement discover that words commonly encountered in daily conversation have a very different meaning when spoken by criminals.



2. Author: Stanton E. Samenow Ph.D. Dr. Stanton E. Samenow

Stanton E. Samenow Ph.D.
Dr. Stanton E. Samenow, Ph.D.
Stanton Samenow, Ph.D., received his B.A. (cum laude) from Yale University in 1963 and his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1968. After working as a clinical psychologist on adolescent inpatient psychiatric services in the Ann Arbor (Michigan) area, he joined the Program for the Investigation of Criminal Behavior at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, D.C. From 1970 until June, 1978, he was clinical research psychologist for that program. With the late Dr. Samuel Yochelson, he participated in the longest in-depth clinical research-treatment study of offenders that has been conducted in North America. The findings of that study are contained in the three volume publication The Criminal Personality (Lanham, Md.: Roman and Littlefield) that he co-authored with Dr. Yochelson.

In 1978, Dr. Samenow entered the private practice of clinical psychology in Alexandria, Virginia. His specialty has continued to be the evaluation and treatment of juvenile and adult offenders. Dr. Samenow has delivered lectures, training seminars, and workshops in 48 states, Canada, and England. These presentations have been to a variety of professional groups including mental health, law enforcement, corrections, education, social services, and the judiciary. He has served as a consultant and expert witness for a variety of courts and agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Dade County (Florida) Public Schools, Federal Bureau of Prisons, and the U.S. Office of Probation. In 1980, he was appointed by President Reagan to the Law Enforcement Task Force and in 1982 to the President's Task Force on Victims of Crime. In 1987, President Reagan appointed him as a Conferee to the White House Conference on a Drug-Free America.

Dr. Samenow's book Inside the Criminal Mind (NY: Times Books/ Random House) was originally published in 1984. A revised, updated edition was published in 2004 (NY: Crown Publishing/Random House). In 1999, a Japanese translation was published (Tokyo: Kodansha). In addition, he has authored numerous articles for professional publications and appeared frequently on national radio and television broadcasts, including 60 Minutes, The Phil Donahue Show, Good Morning America, The CBS Morning News, The Today Show and The Larry King Show. Straight Talk About Criminals, was published by Jason Aronson in April of 1998.

In March, 1989, Dr. Samenow's book about prevention of antisocial behavior was published. It is titled Before It's Too Late: Why Some Kids Get Into Trouble and What Parents Can Do About It (NY: Times Books/Random House). The book was revised and expanded in 1999. The book was published in Japan (by Kodansha), in Taiwan (by Life Potential Publishing Co.), and in Poland (Warsaw: Proszynski i S-ka). The paperback edition was published during November of 2001.

Dr. Samenow's book "The Myth of the Out of Character Crime" was published in 2007. A paperback edition was published in 2010.

In 1994, a three-part videotape and workbook featuring Dr. Samenow's work was released ("Commitment to Change: Overcoming Errors in Thinking" distributed by FMS productions, Carpinteria, California). The materials provide an interactive program for use with inmates, students or staff in mental health, corrections, substance abuse programs, and educational settings. Early in 2000, a second series of videotapes and workbooks was released regarding identifying and addressing "tactics" which antisocial juveniles and adults deploy obstructing effective communication. The third series, "The Power of Consequences," was released during late July of 2002. "Fear—The Anger Trigger" is a three part DVD series that was released in 2010.

Dr. Samenow wrote a book based on his experience as an independent custody evaluator published in 2002. It is titled In the Best Interest of the Child: How to Protect Your Child from the Pain of Your Divorce.

Recently, Random House/Broadway has published in paperback Dr. Samenow's updated, revised Inside the Criminal Mind.

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Reply #18)

Thu Jun 8, 2017, 09:24 PM

19. That's nice. I hope you enjoy his book. n/t

 

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Response to DefenseLawyer (Reply #19)

Thu Jun 8, 2017, 09:27 PM

20. Okee!

 

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 07:42 PM

12. Everyone should read this

It's a 'getting to know' Don the Con. Thanks

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Response to Madam45for2923 (Original post)

Wed Jun 7, 2017, 08:01 PM

14. Good read

Thanks for posting this!

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