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Mon May 6, 2013, 03:27 PM

 

‘World’s first 3-D printable handgun’ under fire

Source: Yahoo News

The creator of what's being called the world's first 3-D-printed handgun is coming under fire from lawmakers concerned that anyone with a 3-D printer and an Internet connection will be able to print an untraceable arsenal.

Cody Wilson, the 25-year-old founder of Defense Distributed, is expected to release his controversial blueprint for the gun—called the "Liberator"—online this week, according to Forbes.

“Security checkpoints, background checks and gun regulations will do little good if criminals can print plastic firearms at home and bring those firearms through metal detectors with no one the wiser," Israel said in a statement on Friday. "When I started talking about the issue of plastic firearms months ago, I was told the idea of a plastic gun is science-fiction. Now that this technology is proven, we need to act now."

Read more: http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/3d-printable-gun-153109290.html



Oops, forgot the link, fixed.

So far the media seems to be missing a key aspect of this story: Once a person can print their own gun, they don't need to buy one from the gun manufacturers. This means that the NRA will soon have to shift gears and come out against 3-D guns at the behest of their masters, Colt, Armalite, et al. Coming out AGAINST guns is something the NRA has never done, and I don't see the average 2nd Amendment extremist being very forgiving about any nuanced argument the NRA will offer up.

In order to protect its profits, gun makers will have to forcefully and vocally oppose 3-D guns.

Then there are all the other troubling aspects of this technology:

1) Guns will have no serial numbers.

2) Guns will be easy to destroy, thus eliminating ballistics comparisons. Print your gun, kill your target, melt the gun down.

3) Guns will be able to pass through metal detectors easily (though you will still have to get the bullets through).

4) Plastic bullets are next on the list (though I don't think it is possible, at least not now, to make usable plastic casing) further reducing the weapons magnetic signature. (Taggants in the gun powder would seem the only possible way of tracing such a weapon).

5) How reliable will these weapons be? A "misprint" could mean the safety does not work.

These are just a few of the ramifications, I am sure I am overlooking quite a few others.

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Reply ‘World’s first 3-D printable handgun’ under fire (Original post)
Kelvin Mace May 2013 OP
Blandocyte May 2013 #1
OrwellwasRight May 2013 #44
CarrieLynne May 2013 #45
Gin May 2013 #2
Heather MC May 2013 #81
azurnoir May 2013 #3
Whoopdedoo May 2013 #7
azurnoir May 2013 #8
Turborama May 2013 #11
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #10
azurnoir May 2013 #14
Turborama May 2013 #4
Ikonoklast May 2013 #5
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #12
NickB79 May 2013 #21
Ikonoklast May 2013 #33
pipoman May 2013 #6
tinrobot May 2013 #9
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #16
tinrobot May 2013 #25
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #40
tinrobot May 2013 #49
Ikonoklast May 2013 #35
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #36
Ikonoklast May 2013 #39
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #41
Ikonoklast May 2013 #46
jtuck004 May 2013 #55
cui bono May 2013 #54
Tx4obama May 2013 #13
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #17
baldguy May 2013 #51
Tx4obama May 2013 #48
GreenStormCloud May 2013 #57
Spitfire of ATJ May 2013 #15
Orrex May 2013 #19
Savannahmann May 2013 #24
Orrex May 2013 #26
Savannahmann May 2013 #29
Orrex May 2013 #37
Savannahmann May 2013 #50
Orrex May 2013 #53
Spitfire of ATJ May 2013 #27
tinrobot May 2013 #28
MotherPetrie May 2013 #43
Spitfire of ATJ May 2013 #58
MotherPetrie May 2013 #61
Kablooie May 2013 #82
cosmicone May 2013 #18
Orrex May 2013 #20
loli phabay May 2013 #34
Orrex May 2013 #38
Pterodactyl May 2013 #59
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #23
Savannahmann May 2013 #22
hughee99 May 2013 #30
kentauros May 2013 #64
hughee99 May 2013 #66
Politicalboi May 2013 #31
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #42
mwrguy May 2013 #32
Pterodactyl May 2013 #60
marble falls May 2013 #47
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #70
marble falls May 2013 #74
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #75
Purveyor May 2013 #52
grahamhgreen May 2013 #56
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #69
grahamhgreen May 2013 #76
XVI_Eyes May 2013 #62
Paladin May 2013 #63
kentauros May 2013 #65
hack89 May 2013 #67
kentauros May 2013 #71
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #68
kentauros May 2013 #72
sofa king May 2013 #73
Turbineguy May 2013 #77
Snake Plissken May 2013 #78
orleans May 2013 #79
Kelvin Mace May 2013 #80

Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:32 PM

1. Only good guys with 3D printers will be able to stop this n/t

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Response to Blandocyte (Reply #1)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:14 PM

44. +1

3-D Printers don't kill people, people with 3-D Printers who print guns kill people . . . my head is going to start spinning soon!

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Response to Blandocyte (Reply #1)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:16 PM

45. LOL!

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:36 PM

2. Humans....geez............just what the world needs.....a homemade plastic gun...

That can kill......

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Response to Gin (Reply #2)

Wed May 8, 2013, 10:00 PM

81. We love discovering new ways to kill one another.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:39 PM

3. Link please?

LBN stories need to have a link to article

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Response to Whoopdedoo (Reply #7)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:50 PM

8. ummm thanks n/t

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Response to Whoopdedoo (Reply #7)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:54 PM

11. That's not the link to the article in the OP. See post #4... n/t

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Response to azurnoir (Reply #3)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:53 PM

10. Sorry,

 

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #10)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:56 PM

14. thanks

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:45 PM

5. Barrel is still made of metal, the pistol is then built around the barrel.

Detectable.

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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #5)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:54 PM

12. For now,

 

but that will change as more elaborate composites come into play.

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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #5)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:17 PM

21. Actually no, the barrel is polymer too

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/05/05/meet-the-liberator-test-firing-the-worlds-first-fully-3d-printed-gun/

Unlike the original, steel Liberator, though, Wilson’s weapon is almost entirely plastic: Fifteen of its 16 pieces have been created inside an $8,000 second-hand Stratasys Dimension SST 3D printer, a machine that lays down threads of melted polymer that add up to precisely-shaped solid objects just as easily as a traditional printer lays ink on a page. The only non-printed piece is a common hardware store nail used as its firing pin.


snip

After the test-firing I witnessed, Wilson showed me a video of an ABS plastic barrel the group printed attached to a non-printed gun body firing ten rounds of .380 ammunition before breaking on the eleventh.

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Response to NickB79 (Reply #21)

Mon May 6, 2013, 05:05 PM

33. You are correct, I see they placed a piece of steel inside the frame to make it detectable.

Earlier reports had them laying up polymer around a metal barrel in order to be rendered detectable and legal, it appears that was speculation.

If they made a pistol entirely out of polymer, they would definitely be breaking the law.

Nice way to lose a hand or a face, though.

If they used a high-string polymer filament spiral-wound on a bias for the barrel and fabricated it separately and then laid up polymer around it instead of printing the frame/barrel as a piece, they might get the thing to work without killing its operator after a few firings.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:49 PM

6. The original "Liberator" gun was

 

made for WW2 by the US. The idea was to drop these cheap guns over occupied areas, for those being occupied to use them against their captors once, just to get the captor's real gun.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:51 PM

9. Home made guns are nothing new...

You can walk into a Home Depot and buy everything you need to create a firearm as good or better than this 3D printed device.

My big concern is that fear of guns will be used as a reason to limit consumer use of 3D printers.

When you can print out cheap plastic stuff at home, why would you need a company like Wal Mart to import it from China? Large companies are going to get very protective of their distribution channels and will do everything they can to shut down home 3D printing. If they can use fear of guns to do that, they will.

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Response to tinrobot (Reply #9)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:58 PM

16. Not quite

 

You can walk into a Home Depot and buy everything you need to create a firearm as good or better than this 3D printed device.


It still takes specialized tools and skills to knock off a gun. Using a 3-D printer eliminates the need for those tools and skills.

When you can print out cheap plastic stuff at home, why would you need a company like Wal Mart to import it from China? Large companies are going to get very protective of their distribution channels and will do everything they can to shut down home 3D printing. If they can use fear of guns to do that, they will.


Yes, you put your finger on the other problem facing our corporate masters. This thing is going to give patent holders fits, not to mention the purveyors of Chinese crap of the world.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #16)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:32 PM

25. A simple gun can be as simple as a pipe and a shotgun shell...

...with a rubber band and a nail to set if off.

The 3D printer is also a "specialized" tool. One that can print this gun costs a few grand, minimum and requires a bit of experience to use properly. Of course, prices will go down, but I doubt people will be buying 3D printers to make plastic guns in the foreseeable future. If that was your goal, you could easily get a small CNC machine today for the same price and make your gun out of metal instead of plastic.

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Response to tinrobot (Reply #25)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:04 PM

40. Describe "forseeable future"

 

I am seeing them under a $2,000 within five years.

Reminds me of a conversation I had with a Compugraphics salesman in 1989. Compugraphic sold photo-digital typesetters, state of the art stuff that ran $50,000 and up and required an elaborate developing process and expensive ($1 a page) photo paper. I asked him what was the company's strategy now that LASERs were coming on strong and cheap (a nickel a page). His response is that his product line was safe because:

1) LASERs didn't have anywhere near the resolution of typesetters (true at the time, 300 dpi versus 2400 dpi).

2) LASERs were too slow.

3) People were not going to dump equipment they had invested hundreds of thousands of dollars, or even millions, for "tinker toys" run by "unreliable" PCs.

I pointed out to him that:

1) 600 dpi printers were due out the next year and that most people not in the trade couldn't tell the difference between 600 and 2400dpi without a magnifying glass, especially when printed on newsprint.

2) This was only true when you left the developing process out of the equation, and again, faster printers were coming next year.

3) People would dump expensive equipment despite the investment when they were spending a similar amount on consumables, a price that would drop 95% with LaserJet printers. Also, given the choice between $250,000 workstations which could only set type and $10,000 PCs that could set type and much more, getting rid of the equipment would be a no-brainer.

In fact, we dumped all our equipment within 18 months, and he lost his job shortly after that as the typesetting division scaled back.

All the points you make are completely true, but as I keep explaining we deal in fact, they deal in "perception". The allure of a "unregistered", "untraceable" gun will be too much for these folks, and ultimately, 3-D guns is not something the gun makers can let stand.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #40)

Mon May 6, 2013, 07:47 PM

49. 3D printers are already under $2000...

...and you can print in plastic up to about 8 inches square. Almost enough to print a one-time use gun.

But again... big deal. There are much easier ways to get guns in this country.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #16)

Mon May 6, 2013, 05:25 PM

35. All you would need is a few basic tools, and the raw materials.

Very little skill involved beyond a basic understanding of the mechanics involved and fabricating.



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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #35)

Mon May 6, 2013, 05:47 PM

36. Again, more sophisticated

 

than simply hooking up a printer, loading a file and pressing "Print".

People have been able to make zip guns in shop class for ages, but then, these days few schools have shop class anymore.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #36)

Mon May 6, 2013, 05:54 PM

39. You don't need $8000.00 to make one.

Which would be the biggest stumbling block for most, not the skills needed.

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Response to Ikonoklast (Reply #39)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:05 PM

41. Prices will fall

 

I am betting under $2,000 in 5 years. People already have the PCs.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #41)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:17 PM

46. Still way more than fifty bucks, or less.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #16)

Mon May 6, 2013, 08:38 PM

55. Hop on over to your local state prison and ask to see their homemade firearms collection - created

 


by people who "earn" the right to be locked up in maximum security state prisons, with nothing but time and imagination, and common shop tools. Yet they still seem to manufacture freakin' guns.

I've seen those in Oklahoma at McCalester, and virtually every other state has the same thing.

Don't need no stinkin' specialized tools. The 3D printers just make it faster and more available.Even the gunpower is just made from common elements. (I know, because I was making my own gunpowder when I was shooting model rockets at 10 years old, and made more than one single-shooter cannon with a handle).

What takes more specialized equipment is making light 30 round semi-auto guns. Heavier, but the gatling gun was available in the Civil War, and they had nothing even close to the technology we have now.

It's not as hard as people would like to make others believe.




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Response to tinrobot (Reply #9)


Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:55 PM

13. Related article regarding Senator Schumer's Sunday news presser below


Schumer announces support to make 3D printed guns illegal
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022802992


Edited subject line to fix typo.

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Response to Tx4obama (Reply #13)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:59 PM

17. I am quite sure they will be able to make them illegal

 

but that will hardly stop the "patriots" from making them.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #17)

Mon May 6, 2013, 08:00 PM

51. Kiddie porn is easy to make too. We still make it illegal.

 

And producers of it are social pariahs. Same should be done for the pigs who design, distribute & make printable plastic guns.

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Response to Tx4obama (Reply #13)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:43 PM

48. More Schumer quotes in the article below


Schumer: U.S. needs to block 3D plastic guns like ‘The Liberator’ from Defense Distributed

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/schumer-stop-plastic-guns-article-1.1335599?localLinksEnabled=false&utm_source=feedly

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Response to Tx4obama (Reply #48)

Mon May 6, 2013, 09:43 PM

57. Schumer will have some First Amendment problems with that legislation. N/T

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 03:56 PM

15. That will be funny to see the NRA say there is a gun they don't like.

 

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #15)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:11 PM

19. They'll frame it as a concern for safety

Something like this:
The National Rifle Association's primary concern has always been the protection of 2nd Amendment rights, but we are equally dedicated to guaranteeing that firearms are safe. These new plastic weapons are dangerous and unreliable and pose grave risks to the user's safety.

We recognize firearm ownership to be a sacred right and duty, but law abiding gun owners must take care to use only those firearms that are safely designed and built by experts. A homemade 3D printed gun simply can't compare to the safety and reliability of a professionally designed and manufactured firearm.


Blah blah blah

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Response to Orrex (Reply #19)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:27 PM

24. No they won't.

 

The NRA hasn't spoken up about the Remington 700, which has a horrific design flaw, and can go off with no warning, or actions of the shooter. It has killed several people, and is a well known design flaw, and has been known as a design flaw for more than sixty years. Yet, the rifle is still manufactured today, with the same design flaw, and the NRA has never issued a warning about the rifle, or called upon Remington to stop making it.

Safety of the firearm, doesn't matter. If it did, then the NRA would have pressured Remington to change the design of the rifle, and recalled and repaired the existing rifles. That's never been done, and that proves that the NRA could care less about safety.

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Response to Savannahmann (Reply #24)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:33 PM

26. They don't care about safety. They care about money.

That's why they'll attack the 3D-printed guns, because there's no money to be made on them.

Safety is irrelevant, but they will be happy to pretend to be concerned about safety if it serves their masters.

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Response to Orrex (Reply #26)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:42 PM

29. Again, no they won't.

 

They oppose any regulations, and they'll oppose this too. The reason is if they claim a gun, any gun, is unsafe. Then that opens dozens of lawsuits about guns with questionable safety records, and using the NRA statements on this one being "unsafe" they'll be able to ban the guns under safety regulations like they did with Lawn Darts. The NRA knows this, which is why they have always said gun safety should be determined by litigation by individual consumers, not class action lawsuits, and not government regulations.

If they support banning this pistol thing, due to safety, then they'll find that someone else has safety complaints about a different pistol that is not well made, then the NRA finds itself being the BBB of the gun trade, and they don't want that.

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Response to Savannahmann (Reply #29)

Mon May 6, 2013, 05:47 PM

37. I still disagree with you, but you make an interesting case

Given that the NRA serves its corporate masters over all, how do you think that they will respond to this?

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Response to Orrex (Reply #37)

Mon May 6, 2013, 07:59 PM

50. They will object when someone tries to pass a law.

 

But not too loudly, not as loudly as they did over the most recent legislative attempt. Then they will issue a statement supporting the Government, and the nation, and the legislative process. That way when someone does use one of those plastic guns to murder someone else, they NRA can say we need to enforce existing laws. Laws that they support fully.

Then they'll up the fundraising to fight the batch of laws that come next.

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Response to Savannahmann (Reply #50)

Mon May 6, 2013, 08:16 PM

53. Sigh.

Sadly, that sounds all too likely.

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Response to Orrex (Reply #19)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:35 PM

27. Might be believable but they defended $60 Ravens...

 

You know,....because nothing is better for a woman to protect herself than a teeny gun that will blow up in her hand.

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Response to Orrex (Reply #19)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:36 PM

28. The NRA is concerned with gun manufacturers, period.

3D printed guns could take away their business as easily as gun legislation.

The NRA's goal is to sell as many guns as possible. It is not to protect the second amendment or ensure public safety. They are basically a marketing arm of the gun manufacturers.

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #15)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:11 PM

43. I would expect gun manufacturers to ramp up production of 3-D gun printers.

 

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Response to MotherPetrie (Reply #43)

Mon May 6, 2013, 09:47 PM

58. Why can't these "patriots" just 3D print things like an exact model of the Mayflower?

 



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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #58)

Mon May 6, 2013, 10:29 PM

61. Good question! It's certainly loaded with enough phallic symbols. OTOH, they don't shoot anything

 

from their ends.

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #15)

Thu May 9, 2013, 02:19 AM

82. They won't have to say anything.

The lobbyists will simply order their Congress people to make it illegal and it will be so.
Nothing has to be said publicly except by the politicians.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:07 PM

18. This unnecessarily and unfairly targets

 

"responsible" 3-D printer owners.



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Response to cosmicone (Reply #18)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:13 PM

20. I object because it infringes upon my plans to print my own customized LEGO elements.

Damn gun-fondlers!

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Response to Orrex (Reply #20)

Mon May 6, 2013, 05:17 PM

34. omg genius, i think this is how i will buying one to my wife.

 

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Response to loli phabay (Reply #34)

Mon May 6, 2013, 05:48 PM

38. Wait a couple of years until they get the tolerances tighter

LEGO is famous for its laser-precise tooling. Wait until 3D printing gets to that level before you invest and disappoint yourself with the results!

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Response to Orrex (Reply #20)

Mon May 6, 2013, 10:18 PM

59. That is so cool!

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Response to cosmicone (Reply #18)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:26 PM

23. Well, given that these things

 

are being used to manufacture liver tissue as I write this, there are plenty of "good things" this technology can do. However, it is one of those "revolutionary" techs that is going to have LOT of unforeseen consequences. The press is just harping on its one bad use (for the moment).

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:24 PM

22. So question. Does this mean the NRA will oppose background checks for 3D printers?

 

Just to make sure I understand the situation. Technology exists that makes it possible to manufacture an untraceable gun in the privacy of your home. A gun that would be undetectable and apparently too much like the one used in the movies a decade or so ago. Then it was fiction, now unfortunately, it is reality. So we have this technology, and there aren't any laws that cover this sort of thing, other than we trust the guy who prints to gun to include a bit of metal in it?

So after Crazed Lunatic tries to buy a gun at a gun store, and is turned down, instead he buys a printer, and makes one at home. Then he purchases the ammunition, if someone doesn't come up with a way to print the ammunition, and is able to shoot anyone he wants.

The job of the police, in convicting him is nearly impossible, because crazed lunatic can toss the gun onto his gas BBQ and melt it down destroying the evidence.

Then if we're really lucky, the crazed lunatic will take another day, or two, to print up another one.

Someone wake me up, because this is a nightmare.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:43 PM

30. Jeez, and I can't even print a 3 page spreadsheet without a F'ing paper jam! n/t

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Response to hughee99 (Reply #30)

Tue May 7, 2013, 09:05 AM

64. Is that you, Samir?

Samir: No, not again. I... why does it say paper jam when there is no paper jam? I swear to God, one of these days, I just kick this piece of shit out the window.

Michael Bolton: You and me both, man. That thing is lucky I'm not armed.

Samir: Piece of shit.

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Response to kentauros (Reply #64)

Tue May 7, 2013, 11:09 AM

66. PC load letter? What the fuck does that mean? n/t

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:54 PM

31. Make it illegal like printing money

 

I know it won't stop them from doing so, but make a penalty for doing so. You need the internet to use it, so the address can be traced, and they will have evidence on you from your computer. Steal music you get caught. This may only scrutinize the internet more to find the gun makers. And I never thought about the NRA connection of being against these gun printers, but I can see that happening if the government doesn't make it a felony to print a gun.

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Response to Politicalboi (Reply #31)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:06 PM

42. Bittorrent and Tor

 

eliminate the trail.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 04:57 PM

32. Mandate a "V Chip" in all 3-D printers

One that can either block weapons or alert the BATF.

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Response to mwrguy (Reply #32)

Mon May 6, 2013, 10:21 PM

60. Two problems with that.

First, you'd have to have printers that can understand what the parts are for. Most gun parts would be indistinguishable from machine parts to a casual review.

Second, alerting the government could be overcome simply by disconnecting the device from the internet, or writing software to overcome it.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 06:19 PM

47. There's all sorts of ways to put markers in the polys used.

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Response to marble falls (Reply #47)

Tue May 7, 2013, 11:54 AM

70. Helpful

 

if the gun still exists.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #70)

Tue May 7, 2013, 01:37 PM

74. But that is true about any gun. Balistics work only if the gun hasn't been 'disapeared'.

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Response to marble falls (Reply #74)

Tue May 7, 2013, 01:39 PM

75. A gun made of plastic

 

is a hell of lot easier to destroy utterly than one made of steel.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 08:04 PM

52. 3D Printer? Staples Says, 'Yeah, We've Got That'

 

The office supply retailer is becoming the first US retail outlet to sell a 3D printer, the $1300 Cube 3D Printer.

May 06, 2013, 2:24 PM — 3D printers are taking another step in the long haul toward the mainstream, with a little help from Staples.

On Friday, the office supply retailer began selling the Cube 3D Printer online for $1300, becoming the first major U.S. retailer to sell a 3D printer. Staples says it will offer the printer in "a limited number" of retail stores by the end of June.

Cube 3D Printer

The Cube, made by 3D systems, can create items measuring up to 5.5 inches in any dimension, using ABS and PLA plastic cartridges in 16 colors. Staples will also sell replacement cartridges, stabilizers, and print pads.

Other features include Wi-Fi connectivity, plug-and-play support and 25 free design templates.

MORE...

http://www.itworld.com/hardware/355257/3d-printer-staples-says-yeah-weve-got

I thought they would be more expensive than this. In a couple of years they be a couple hundred bucks...

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Mon May 6, 2013, 09:16 PM

56. Heck, they could just print it after they get on the plane!

 

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Response to grahamhgreen (Reply #56)

Tue May 7, 2013, 11:53 AM

69. The printer is a bit bullky

 

even the morons at TSA would probably notice.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #69)

Tue May 7, 2013, 03:25 PM

76. LOL. The TSA is a scam:

 

From ABC:

"According to one report, undercover TSA agents testing security at a Newark airport terminal on one day in 2006 found that TSA screeners failed to detect concealed bombs and guns 20 out of 22 times. A 2007 government audit leaked to USA Today revealed that undercover agents were successful slipping simulated explosives and bomb parts through Los Angeles's LAX airport in 50 out of 70 attempts, and at Chicago's O'Hare airport agents made 75 attempts and succeeded in getting through undetected 45 times."

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Tue May 7, 2013, 01:13 AM

62. Not to sound fatalist

But as tech gets better, it may be a losing battle trying to keep weapons out of people's hands.

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Response to XVI_Eyes (Reply #62)

Tue May 7, 2013, 08:14 AM

63. Yeah---but just watch the battle that pro-gun militants wage....

...against better and better gun-tracing technology.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Tue May 7, 2013, 09:14 AM

65. Okay,

If a customer of these sets of plans for printing a plastic gun goes and shoots up a plane, will the person that made the plans now be liable?

And whether or not they are indeed liable, will they feel guilty for what their gun plans have wrought?

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Response to kentauros (Reply #65)

Tue May 7, 2013, 11:25 AM

67. No - if making and distributing the plans is legal then there is no criminal liability

just like a gun dealer who obeys all the laws would not be liable if a gun he sold was used in a crime.

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Response to hack89 (Reply #67)

Tue May 7, 2013, 12:43 PM

71. Okay, thanks.

I do still wonder about their conscience, though...

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Response to kentauros (Reply #65)

Tue May 7, 2013, 11:52 AM

68. Good question

 

The person making the current plans has a federal license to manufacture firearms. The Bush administration put through a number of laws granting immunity from liability to gun makers. So, the answer would seem to be, no one can sue you if you have a license. Whether they can sue you if you don't is an open question.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #68)

Tue May 7, 2013, 12:56 PM

72. Thank you.

That is a good observation about those without licenses. The plans would have to be electronic (whatever file-type the printer uses, plus a PDF for assembly) so, unless the buyer knows how to modify those files, they'll remain traceable back to the original creator of the design.

Now, if the printer-file is something like a CNC-file, then you can open them in AutoCAD or Solidworks, and make adjustments...

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Tue May 7, 2013, 01:17 PM

73. Told ya.

From last summer:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=view_post&forum=1002&pid=1003805

It won't be long before someone creates a 3D printer which can recreate some or all of itself, meaning it will be simple to set up a miniature armory anywhere, one which can grow exponentially to meet demand, one which can make firearms from classic designs, or from new ones, with nearly impossible to identify machining marks (the illicit manufacturer can simply interchange parts in the printers so that none bear the same machining marks).

Others have pointed out the similarity to the "zip gun epidemic" of the first half of the 20th Century, when poor urban populations were effectively forcibly disarmed except for the firearms that they could and did create for themselves.

But that historical comparison does not take into account the hyperbolic mathematics that will underlie the proliferation of these devices.

Again I implore my fellow readers to recognize that gun control will never return the value that reducing poverty, providing inexpensive mental health, and better educating citizens will offer. Control of firearms may now be impossible; those other things are not impossible and now MUST be achieved if our society is to avoid upheaval.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Tue May 7, 2013, 06:26 PM

77. Cody Wilson's motto:

Wake up every morning and make things just a little bit worse.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Tue May 7, 2013, 07:25 PM

78. It should be called the Darwinator

It's probably not a bad idea to thin out the herd of the idiots who try to shoot this gun

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Original post)

Wed May 8, 2013, 04:18 AM

79. on the big bang theory howard and raj made little dolls of themselves w/a 3-d printer

i thought it was cute and a bit sci-fi

but an actual gun? omg!

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Response to orleans (Reply #79)

Wed May 8, 2013, 12:08 PM

80. When I first heard about this technology

 

I thought to myself, "WOW! If I had this when I was a kid I could have made a phaser."

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