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Mon Jun 27, 2016, 10:33 PM

41 Years Since Jumping Bull (But 500 Years of Trauma)

41 Years Since Jumping Bull (But 500 Years of Trauma)
June 27, 2016
by Leonard Peltier

June 26th marks 41 years since the long summer day when three young men were killed at the home of the Jumping Bull family, near Oglala, during a firefight in which I and dozens of others participated. While I did not shoot (and therefore did not kill) FBI agents Ronald Williams and Jack Coler, I nevertheless have great remorse for the loss of their young lives, the loss of my friend Joe Stuntz, and for the grieving of their loved ones. I would guess that, like me, many of my brothers and sisters who were there that day wish that somehow they could have done something to change what happened and avoid the tragic outcome of the shootout.

This is not something I have thought about casually and then moved on. It’s something I think about every day. As I look back, I remember the expressions of both fear and courage on the faces of my brothers and sisters as we were being attacked. We thought we were going to be killed! We defended our elders and children as they scattered for protection and to escape. Native people have experienced such assaults for centuries, and the historical trauma of the generations was carried by the people that day — and in the communities that suffered further trauma in the days that followed the shootout, as the authorities searched for those of us who had escaped the Jumping Bull property.

As the First Peoples of Turtle Island, we live with daily reminders of the centuries of efforts to terminate our nations, eliminate our cultures, and destroy our relatives and families. To this day, everywhere we go there are reminders — souvenirs and monuments of the near extermination of a glorious population of Indigenous Peoples. Native Peoples as mascots, the disproportionately high incarceration of our relatives, the appropriation of our culture, the never-ending efforts to take even more of Native Peoples’ land, and the poisoning of that land all serve as reminders of our history as survivors of a massive genocide. We live with this trauma every day. We breathe, eat and drink it. We pass it on to our children. And we struggle to overcome it.

Like so many Native children, I was ripped away from my family at the age of 9 or so and taken away to get the “Indian” out of me at a boarding school. At that time, Native Peoples were not able to speak our own languages for fear of being beaten or worse. Our men’s long hair, which is an important part of our spiritual life, was forcibly cut off in an effort to shame us. Our traditional names were replaced by new European-American names.

More:
http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/06/27/41-years-since-jumping-bull-500-years-of-trauma/

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Reply 41 Years Since Jumping Bull (But 500 Years of Trauma) (Original post)
Judi Lynn Jun 2016 OP
Uncle Joe Jun 2016 #1
catchnrelease Jun 2016 #2

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Jun 28, 2016, 12:05 AM

1. Kicked and recommended.

Thanks for the thread, Judi Lynn.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Jun 28, 2016, 01:22 AM

2. K&R

This makes me think of when I put the first of many "Free Leonard Peltier" bumper stickers on my car. So long ago. Then another car and another. So many times I thought he would be pardoned. So many disappointments.

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