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Fri Jul 1, 2016, 02:30 AM

How Severe Is Venezuela’s Crisis?

How Severe Is Venezuela’s Crisis?

It’s deep but not cataclysmic, and mainstream US media have consistently exaggerated the extent of it.

By Gabriel Hetland

June 22, 2016


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People buy food at a market in Caracas, Venezuela on June 21, 2016. (Mariana Bazo / Reuters)
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Caracas—According to The New York Times, Venezuela is “a country that is in a state of total collapse,” with shuttered government offices, widespread hunger, and failing hospitals that resemble “hell on earth.” There is reportedly “often little traffic in Caracas simply because so few people, either for lack of money or work, are going out.” The Washington Post, which has repeatedly called for foreign intervention against Venezuela, describes the country using similar, at times identical, language of “collapse,” “catastrophe,” “complete disaster,” and “failed state.” A recent Post article describes a “McDonald’s, empty of customers because runaway inflation means a Happy Meal costs nearly a third of an average monthly wage.” NPR reports “Venezuela is Running Out of Beer Amid Severe Economic Crisis”. When Coca-Cola announced plans to halt production due to a lack of sugar, Forbes dubbed Venezuela “the Country With No Coke.” The Wall Street Journal reports on fears that people will “die of hunger.”

Is Venezuela descending into a nightmarish scenario, as these stories suggest? To answer this question I’ve spent the last three weeks talking to dozens of people—rich and poor, Chavista and opposition, urban and rural—across Venezuela. My investigation leaves little doubt that Venezuela is in the midst of a severe crisis, characterized by triple-digit inflation, scarcities of basic goods, widespread changes in food-consumption patterns, and mounting social and political discontent. Yet mainstream media have consistently misrepresented and significantly exaggerated the severity of the crisis. It’s real and should by no means be minimized, but Venezuela is not in a state of cataclysmic collapse.

 Accounts suggesting otherwise are not only inaccurate but also dangerous, insofar as they prepare the ground for foreign intervention. This week the Permanent Council of the Organization of American States is holding an emergency meeting to consider OAS Secretary General Luis Almagro’s invocation of the Inter-American Democratic Charter against Venezuela. This action is taken against countries that have experienced an “unconstitutional alteration of the constitutional regime that seriously impairs the democratic order in a member state,” and can lead to a country’s suspension from the OAS. The Venezuelan government, which despite some foot-dragging has allowed steps toward holding a recall referendum against President Nicolás Maduro, vigorously rejects this charge, as do many OAS member states. It is worth noting that the OAS has not invoked the Democratic Charter against Brazil, which recently experienced what many OAS member states and prominent Latin American observers see as a coup.

 Accounts suggesting otherwise are not only inaccurate but also dangerous, insofar as they prepare the ground for foreign intervention. This week the Permanent Council of the Organization of American States is holding an emergency meeting to consider OAS Secretary General Luis Almagro’s invocation of the Inter-American Democratic Charter against Venezuela. This action is taken against countries that have experienced an “unconstitutional alteration of the constitutional regime that seriously impairs the democratic order in a member state,” and can lead to a country’s suspension from the OAS. The Venezuelan government, which despite some foot-dragging has allowed steps toward holding a recall referendum against President Nicolás Maduro, vigorously rejects this charge, as do many OAS member states. It is worth noting that the OAS has not invoked the Democratic Charter against Brazil, which recently experienced what many OAS member states and prominent Latin American observers see as a coup.

More:
https://www.thenation.com/article/how-severe-is-venezuelas-crisis/

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Judi Lynn Jul 2016 OP
Judi Lynn Jul 2016 #1
forest444 Jul 2016 #2

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 1, 2016, 02:35 AM

1. Media Exaggerations of Apocalyptic Venezuela Plays into Regime Change Narrative

Media Exaggerations of Apocalyptic Venezuela Plays into Regime Change Narrative

July 1, 2016

Media Exaggerations of Apocalyptic Venezuela Plays into Regime Change Narrative

Gabriel Hetland & Rachael Boothroyd say that the crisis in Venezuela is real, but the international media descriptions of horror stories are far from representative of the real situation on the ground

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=16653

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #1)

Fri Jul 1, 2016, 10:25 AM

2. As you know, it's always about the narrative.

And to the degree that it's true, I don't think anyone doubts that the pro-coup people (mostly in Venezuela itself; but some from the U.S. as well) have had a hand in whatever shortage problems they do have.

All of which is incredibly pointless, given that the PSUV is very unlikely to win the 2018 elections - and both Chávez and Maduro proved to be respectful of election results.

What I'd like to know is: how many of our U.S. taxpayer dollars have gone toward making these people's already difficult lives even more so? Nixon thought nothing of throwing "$10 million - more if necessary" to the mission to oust Allende - and that was in 1970 dollars! I'm pretty sure much more was squandered this time.

Our tax dollars at play (when aren't they!).

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