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Sun Aug 22, 2021, 08:53 AM

For the Seventeenth Time, Afghanistan Was Never "Winnable"



For the Seventeenth Time, Afghanistan Was Never “Winnable”

Forget what armchair generals say: disaster was foreordained three months into the 2001 invasion.


MIKE LOFGREN
August 21, 2021

The recent unpleasantness in Afghanistan has occasioned one of the usual cyclical national bouts of self-righteousness from the media, the chattering classes, and Very Serious People in general. Who could have let this outrage occur, they wail, and for God’s sake, what are we going to do about it in five minutes flat?

Snip…

The sudden collapse of the Afghan army and the scenes of panic in Kabul – a well-informed source tells me there wasn’t a real firefight anywhere in the country, the local commanders having simply negotiated dozens of individual capitulations – have occasioned a frenzy of moral posturing from people who, for at least a decade and a half, have done their best not to let Afghanistan even register on their consciousness. It is a politically disparate group whose common bond of sanctimoniousness has led to a curious tactical alliance.

Snip…

It’s no secret that the Republican Party and the conservative movement and religious Right that underpin it are absolutely saturated with misogyny. In the last couple of years, the incels have taken it to a whole new level, being distinguishable from the Taliban chiefly by virtue of wearing polo shirts instead of thawbs. And for a goose-stepping poltroon like Kevin McCarthy to be bleating about the rights of women is truly stomach-turning in its impudence.

Aside from that, Republicans seem more upset and judgmental about the overthrow of a central Asian government 7,000 miles away than the nearly successful overthrow, a few months ago, of the very government of which they are a part – an attempted overthrow that in which some of them may have participated. We eagerly await their indignant calls for an investigation of the fall of Afghanistan, yet only recently they soundly rejected a motion to investigate the events of January 6.

Continues…

https://www.commondreams.org/views/2021/08/21/seventeenth-time-afghanistan-was-never-winnable

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Reply For the Seventeenth Time, Afghanistan Was Never "Winnable" (Original post)
Kid Berwyn Aug 2021 OP
agingdem Aug 2021 #1
Kid Berwyn Aug 2021 #2
Ocelot II Aug 2021 #3
dalton99a Aug 2021 #4
lees1975 Aug 2021 #5

Response to Kid Berwyn (Original post)

Sun Aug 22, 2021, 09:10 AM

1. not ever..Bush/Cheney/Rumsfeld Vanity War

Shock and Awe became Oh Shit Now What within weeks and this clusterfuck of epic proportions was fueled with lies and fed to us by the ain't war great MSM...

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Response to agingdem (Reply #1)

Sun Aug 22, 2021, 09:43 AM

2. "Money trumps peace." -- George w Bush



Another idea never mentioned on tee vee, from the Before Time…

Nationalize the Defense Industry!

BY JOHN STANTON
Counterpunch, July 6, 2006

In 1969 John Kenneth Galbraith penned a piece for the New York Times titled The Big Defense Firms Are Really Public Firms and Should be Nationalized arguing, among other things, that it was folly for defense contractors to claim that they were private corporations. Such claims made a mockery of free enterprise.

Nearly 40 years hence, Charlie Cray and Lee Drutman have resurrected and energized Galbraith’s argument in their work titled Corporations and the Public Purpose: Restoring the Balance (Seattle Journal for Social Justice, Winter 2005). They make an exceptionally compelling case for putting the defense industrial base (DIB) into the direct service of the American public through a form of nationalization: federal chartering.

“Converting the companies to publicly-controlled, nonprofit status would introduce a key change: it would reduce the entities’ impetus for aggressive lobbying and campaign contributions. Chartering the defense contractors at the federal level would in effect allow Congress to ban such activities outright, thereby controlling an industry that is now a driving force rather than a servant of foreign policy objectives. As public firms, they would certainly continue to participate in the policy fora designed to determine the nation’s national security and defense technology needs, but the profit-driven impetus to control the process in order to best serve corporate shareholders would be eliminated. Thus, by turning defense and security firms into full public corporations, we would replace the criteria by which their performance is judged from quarterly earnings targets to criteria that is more consistent with the national interest.”

If Cray and Lutman’s notion seems radical, it’s only thanks to a fanciful story telling by those who move back and forth through the revolving, and always open, doors of the national security apparatus that link the Department of Defense, the US Congress, and the players who dot the DIB landscape. Apologists for the DIB have always distorted the importance of the defense industry to the nation’s security, particularly after the demise of the Soviet Union. They really believe that their industry should get special recognition for producing the goods and services used to wage war. To sell that concept, they’ve made sure that the difference between contractor and uniformed government employee is completely blurred. With that, it’s impossible to know who is protecting the balance sheet and who is protecting the US Constitution. In short, they’ve sold the public good.

There’s a lot of evidence to show that the DIB is not functioning in the nation’s best interest. Two interesting studies stand out. An April 2005 report by the Government Accounting Office titled Defense Logistics took a hard look at the system that supplies US troops in Iraq and concluded that it needed repair. The pipeline failed to deliver basic supplies, such as MRE rations, in a timely manner. Another from the National Defense University (see below) indicated that defense isn’t reaping broad benefits from information technology. That does not bode well for the push to network centric warfare.

Continues…

https://www.counterpunch.org/2006/07/06/nationalize-the-defense-industry/

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Response to Kid Berwyn (Original post)

Sun Aug 22, 2021, 09:55 AM

3. Excellent article.

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Response to Kid Berwyn (Original post)

Sun Aug 22, 2021, 10:53 AM

4. Kick

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Response to Kid Berwyn (Original post)

Tue Aug 24, 2021, 01:43 PM

5. The best line in the whole article

But also the American people, who are too stupid to understand history, geography, relationships between facts and events, and the limits of national hubris.

I wouldn't say too stupid, though. Just educated in a pathetically incompetent school system.

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