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Thu Oct 2, 2014, 11:53 PM

How the USDA’s new ‘chicken rule’ could change what you eat, and how it’s inspected

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Reply How the USDA’s new ‘chicken rule’ could change what you eat, and how it’s inspected (Original post)
Seedersandleechers Oct 2014 OP
mucifer Oct 2014 #1
Enthusiast Oct 2014 #2
drynberg Oct 2014 #3
KurtNYC Oct 2014 #4
dotymed Oct 2014 #5

Response to Seedersandleechers (Original post)

Fri Oct 3, 2014, 12:15 AM

1. I'll just go over here:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=forum&id=1131

Of course who knows how they are inspecting the vegetables. It's probably the same.

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Response to Seedersandleechers (Original post)

Fri Oct 3, 2014, 03:50 AM

2. Corporate rule.

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Response to Seedersandleechers (Original post)

Fri Oct 3, 2014, 06:48 AM

3. So, whatzitgonna take?

Massive deaths? Photos of hundreds getting care in hospitals? This ain't funny...it's horrible.

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Response to Seedersandleechers (Original post)

Fri Oct 3, 2014, 09:39 AM

4. Likely salmonella is too common to be labelled an 'adulterant' in meats

Salmonella is commonly found in chicken, other poultry and on dry dog food (kibble) but none of these will be recalled unless the levels are above a certain limit. So the system knows it is there but safe handling and thorough cooking is the preferred way to deal with the presence.

As a consumer, you should treat every piece of raw chicken as though it has salmonella present on it -- wash hand, cutting boards, and knives after contact with meat (and before using them on other foods, especially foods that will be eaten raw like salad).

A chicken farmer makes less than 16 cents per bird which is one reason that chickens are commonly raised in warehouses with as many as 200,000 birds each. The environment is very factory-like as shown here:

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Response to Seedersandleechers (Original post)

Fri Oct 3, 2014, 01:00 PM

5. Chicken

is one of the few meats that we proles can still afford.

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