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Wed Jan 31, 2018, 05:19 PM

Memorable Last Lines from Books. Identify?

"Why it might even come in the middle of a sentence and I'd."

"It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known."

"Pernando walked from the helipad. Behind him the red, white and green flapped in the wind."

"Maybe, in only a thousand years."

"Done this day Aprilius 16, in the year of our Lord One Thousand One Hundred and Seventy, being the hundredth year of the English Peoples' Republic."

"The message consisted of.. well it mostly said the word 'darling'."

"Perhaps he would take up Scrabble."

Wolf

Anyone else have any?

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 05:31 PM

1. I only recognize the second one, Sidney Carton's final lines

from "A Tale of Two Cities" by Charles Dickens. Something about "Wolf" tickles my mind, but I can't place it at all.

How about: "Might I trouble you then to be ready in half an hour, and we can stop at Marcini's for a little dinner on the way?"

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 05:34 PM

3. I just finished rereading that Doyle story.

The Dickens quote was the only one in the OP I recognized.

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 05:32 PM

2. "Darling," it said.

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Response to dchill (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 05:37 PM

4. Stephen King's "Pet Sematary" - maybe the scariest last line ever!

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #4)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 05:38 PM

5. That's why I remember it.

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 05:51 PM

6. Here's a good one, too long for a post title.

Hill House itself, not sane, stood against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for eighty years and might stand for eighty more. Within, it's walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.


Hint: it mirrors an echo from the opening lines.

Another hint: made into a movie by a justifiably famous director.

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Response to longship (Reply #6)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 09:30 PM

11. "The Haunting of Hill House"? Just a guess. I read it long ago.

I haven't seen the movie, and if it's something else I'd love to know so I could see it!

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #11)

Thu Feb 1, 2018, 12:33 AM

15. The 1963 Robert Wise production "The Haunting"!!!

Starring Julie Harris, Claire Bloom, and Richard Johnson.

One scary, assed movie. Honors Shirley Jackson's novel, a psychological drama.


Forget the remake. It's horrible.

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 05:53 PM

7. After all, tomorrow is another day

also

Poo-tee-weet?"

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Response to lunasun (Reply #7)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 09:29 PM

10. The first one is from "Gone with the Wind" (optimistic Miss Scarlett!)

I don't recognize "Poo-tee-weet?"

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #10)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 10:00 PM

12. yes correct + the other is the last line of Slaughterhouse Five - Kurt Vonnegut

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 06:16 PM

8. "Well, I'm back", he said.

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Response to First Speaker (Reply #8)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 09:27 PM

9. "The Return of the King"

Samwise Gamgee said it after returning from the Grey Havens.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #9)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 11:02 PM

14. For some reason, I find that line about the most moving thing...

...in the whole damned trilogy. As a tribute to Frodo, it's better than the most elaborate Lorienesque elegy could be...

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Wed Jan 31, 2018, 10:06 PM

13. "Then he began to manipulate the driving levers, using his four agile hands ..."

"He let out the sail, exposing it to the combined rays of the three suns.
Then he began to manipulate the driving levers, using his four agile
hands, while Phyllis, after dismissing a last shred of doubt with an
energetic shake of her velvety ears, took out her compact and, in view
of their return to port, touched up her dear little chimpanzee muzzle."

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Fri Feb 2, 2018, 08:39 PM

16. The Answers are

1: Up the Line by Robert Silverberg

2: A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

3: Irrintzia by J.M. Etxeberria. (Not surprised nobody got that. It never came out in English and has been out of print in Spain for thirty years. It sold badly there.

4: Davy by Edgar Pangborn.

5: The Last Stand of the Barony of Bar es Asifa by Anonymouse. It's an SCA fanfic.

6: An American Guerrilla in the Philippines by Ira Wolfert and Iliff Richardson.

7: Bored of the Rings by Henry Beard and Doug Kenney.

Wolf

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Sat Feb 3, 2018, 12:03 AM

17. The title is in the final paragraph. No need to identify.

"He fell in October, on a day that was so silent and still, that the Army report for that day confined itself to the single sentence: 'All Quiet On The Western Front'. He had fallen forward. Turning him over, one could see that he couldn't have suffered long. His face was calm and peaceful, as if almost glad the end had come at last."

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Response to Wolf Frankula (Original post)

Sat Feb 3, 2018, 10:53 AM

18. The End

Sorry, couldn't resist.

How about "By hook or by crook, I'll be last in this book?"

-- Mal

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