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Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:07 PM

War and war impact movies you think every one should see

:::On going list for me:::

: my sequence has no particularly important meaning, and it has & will shift:

1-Schindler's List
2-Grave Of The Fireflies
3-Thin Red Line
4 A&B-Flags of Our Fathers& Letters from Iwo Jima, these 2 are companion pieces IMO& really should be seen together
4-Saving Private Ryan
5-The Boy In Striped Pajamas.
6-Stallingrad


Add your suggestions.



167 replies, 7808 views

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Reply War and war impact movies you think every one should see (Original post)
irisblue Jun 2019 OP
dameatball Jun 2019 #1
trev Jun 2019 #2
mopinko Jun 2019 #19
trev Jun 2019 #23
IcyPeas Jun 2019 #31
AJT Jun 2019 #3
Duppers Jun 2019 #22
grantcart Jun 2019 #99
AJT Jun 2019 #104
Floyd R. Turbo Jun 2019 #4
Sherman A1 Jun 2019 #122
50 Shades Of Blue Jun 2019 #5
Wounded Bear Jun 2019 #6
irisblue Jun 2019 #7
OregonBlue Jun 2019 #28
Harker Jun 2019 #33
Aristus Jun 2019 #8
Codeine Jun 2019 #11
Aristus Jun 2019 #18
sl8 Jun 2019 #9
Codeine Jun 2019 #12
Harker Jun 2019 #35
VOX Jun 2019 #52
Harker Jun 2019 #54
mitch96 Jun 2019 #10
cwydro Jun 2019 #57
Coventina Jun 2019 #61
mitch96 Jun 2019 #67
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2019 #13
trev Jun 2019 #24
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2019 #47
underpants Jun 2019 #76
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2019 #90
underpants Jun 2019 #92
pangaia Jun 2019 #131
Glorfindel Jun 2019 #136
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2019 #139
Glorfindel Jun 2019 #140
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2019 #141
Glorfindel Jun 2019 #148
geralmar Jun 2019 #14
diva77 Jun 2019 #15
emmaverybo Jun 2019 #32
FailureToCommunicate Jun 2019 #108
diva77 Jun 2019 #121
appalachiablue Jun 2019 #143
FailureToCommunicate Jun 2019 #149
appalachiablue Jun 2019 #159
FailureToCommunicate Jun 2019 #160
CanonRay Jun 2019 #155
Doc_Technical Jun 2019 #16
kysrsoze Jun 2019 #83
geralmar Jun 2019 #17
The Figment Jun 2019 #20
Glorfindel Jun 2019 #138
Ron Obvious Jun 2019 #21
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2019 #48
Mopar151 Jun 2019 #96
trev Jun 2019 #25
ProudMNDemocrat Jun 2019 #26
ADX Jun 2019 #27
OrwellwasRight Jun 2019 #142
OregonBlue Jun 2019 #29
dixiegrrrrl Jun 2019 #49
OregonBlue Jun 2019 #62
Va Lefty Jun 2019 #30
Adsos Letter Jun 2019 #34
captain queeg Jun 2019 #103
sarge43 Jun 2019 #36
appalachiablue Jun 2019 #112
sarge43 Jun 2019 #114
pangaia Jun 2019 #132
appalachiablue Jun 2019 #137
NCjack Jun 2019 #37
Harker Jun 2019 #42
Paladin Jun 2019 #45
NCjack Jun 2019 #55
Paladin Jun 2019 #59
keithbvadu2 Jun 2019 #46
Texasgal Jun 2019 #38
irisblue Jun 2019 #39
Lars39 Jun 2019 #40
nocoincidences Jun 2019 #126
Lars39 Jun 2019 #128
nocoincidences Jun 2019 #130
Shrek Jun 2019 #41
Harker Jun 2019 #43
Harker Jun 2019 #44
edbermac Jun 2019 #50
applegrove Jun 2019 #51
VOX Jun 2019 #53
cwydro Jun 2019 #56
Aristus Jun 2019 #64
hunter Jun 2019 #66
cwydro Jun 2019 #69
Aristus Jun 2019 #70
cwydro Jun 2019 #71
hunter Jun 2019 #68
bif Jun 2019 #58
Coventina Jun 2019 #60
CanonRay Jun 2019 #156
Wounded Bear Jun 2019 #63
uriel1972 Jun 2019 #65
MicaelS Jun 2019 #72
kwassa Jun 2019 #73
Stuart G Jun 2019 #109
shenmue Jun 2019 #74
Mendocino Jun 2019 #75
California_Republic Jun 2019 #77
empedocles Jun 2019 #78
irisblue Jun 2019 #79
empedocles Jun 2019 #81
Sneederbunk Jun 2019 #80
kysrsoze Jun 2019 #82
pangaia Jun 2019 #133
kysrsoze Jun 2019 #84
Aristus Jun 2019 #161
cachukis Jun 2019 #85
quickesst Jun 2019 #86
Recursion Jun 2019 #87
SunSeeker Jun 2019 #88
shadowmayor Jun 2019 #89
BillyBobBrilliant Jun 2019 #91
flying_wahini Jun 2019 #93
masmdu Jun 2019 #94
Martin Eden Jun 2019 #117
discntnt_irny_srcsm Jun 2019 #95
Lokilooney Jun 2019 #97
spike jones Jun 2019 #98
NeoGreen Jun 2019 #100
El Supremo Jun 2019 #101
Mersky Jun 2019 #102
steventh Jun 2019 #105
appalachiablue Jun 2019 #106
Stuart G Jun 2019 #107
NNadir Jun 2019 #153
Stuart G Jun 2019 #154
NNadir Jun 2019 #157
Stuart G Jun 2019 #158
Mendocino Jun 2019 #110
appalachiablue Jun 2019 #111
Liberalhammer Jun 2019 #113
irisblue Jun 2019 #115
Oppaloopa Jun 2019 #116
whistler162 Jun 2019 #118
Maine-i-acs Jun 2019 #119
Aristus Jun 2019 #162
Maine-i-acs Jun 2019 #163
Aristus Jun 2019 #164
Maine-i-acs Jun 2019 #165
littlemissmartypants Jun 2019 #120
krispos42 Jun 2019 #123
maveric Jun 2019 #124
BigmanPigman Jun 2019 #125
nocoincidences Jun 2019 #127
nocoincidences Jun 2019 #129
Historic NY Jun 2019 #134
SCantiGOP Jun 2019 #135
shenmue Jun 2019 #167
OrwellwasRight Jun 2019 #144
Thunderbeast Jun 2019 #145
dem in texas Jun 2019 #146
Stuart G Jun 2019 #151
yesphan Jun 2019 #147
Stuart G Jun 2019 #150
JDC Jun 2019 #152
loyalsister Jun 2019 #166

Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:09 PM

1. Glory, Cold Mountain, Galipoli

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:10 PM

2. Apocalypse Now

The Deer Hunter

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Response to trev (Reply #2)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 11:33 PM

19. full metal jacket.

remember seeing it about the time my son was a chubby, clumsy, grumpy adolescent. i swore right there he would join the military over my dead body.

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Response to mopinko (Reply #19)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:02 PM

23. I liked only the first half of that movie.

Once it left basic training, I felt it slowed down too much and became cumbersome.

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Response to trev (Reply #2)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:56 PM

31. Deer Hunter

I second that.

devastating.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:13 PM

3. I think this could be considered war impact:

The Killing Fields

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Response to AJT (Reply #3)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 11:14 AM

22. Yes!

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Response to AJT (Reply #3)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 08:08 PM

99. Great Movie. I met Dith Pran and Haing Ngor

Actually enfed up with some quality one on one time with Dr. Nor waiting out a 3 hour monsoon blast in a hotel bar in Bangkok. His murder made me very sad.

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Response to grantcart (Reply #99)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:14 PM

104. What a great experience. Yes, his murder was a tragedy.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:17 PM

4. Johnny Got His Gun, Summertree

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Response to Floyd R. Turbo (Reply #4)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 05:29 AM

122. Yup

We read Johnny Got His Gun in HS, during the Vietnam era. It was a powerful message.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:17 PM

5. A Matter of Life and Death (AKA Stairway to Heaven)

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:50 PM

6. Breaker Morant...

The Execution of Eddie Slovak

Guess I'm in a bit of a defeatist mood today.

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Response to Wounded Bear (Reply #6)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 12:55 PM

7. My Detroit area family watched that as a movie of the week in the 70s

Last edited Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:48 PM - Edit history (1)

His remaining family post his execution was much gossiped about.
Also, first time I saw Martin Sheen act.

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Response to Wounded Bear (Reply #6)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:43 PM

28. Agree. One of the best.

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Response to Wounded Bear (Reply #6)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 01:56 PM

33. The Breaker's last couple of lines

are powerful and poignant.

Fine film.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 01:32 PM

8. Kevin Reynold's 'The Beast Of War'.

From 1988. Includes a performance by Stephen Baldwin before he became a religious whackadoodle.

Russian tankers get lost in a blind valley in Afghanistan in 1981, and have to deal with vengeful Mujahedeen. Filmed in Israel using captured Soviet-made tanks and equipment, it was a way of getting a good, up-close look at Soviet-made tanks in the years before YouTube made them pretty much ubiquitous.

The Mujahedeen are played mostly by Israeli actors, although the leader is portrayed by American Steven Bauer. The Russians are all played by Americans. The film received some criticism at the time for having their ostensibly Russian characters speaking in American accents. But I think that just punches up the fact that soldiers are soldiers, regardless of where they come from. It was for the best that the actors didn't use comical, James Bond-villain style Russian accents.

An excellent little film that leaves the viewer thinking: who are the bad guys here?

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Response to Aristus (Reply #8)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:33 PM

11. They changed the name of that one.

When I saw it it was just “The Beast”, and I clicked this thread to recommend it. So good.

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Response to Codeine (Reply #11)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 10:50 PM

18. It depends on the format, which in turn depended on where each cut was released.

The VHS I used to own just titled it "The Beast".

When I got it on DVD, it was "The Beast Of War".

I'm looking at maybe getting it on Blu-Ray, just to see if it has any extras; director's commentary, making-of documentary, etc. But I'm curious to know what title it has.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 03:29 PM

9. Paths of Glory

From https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paths_of_Glory

Paths of Glory is a 1957 American anti-war film[2] directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on the eponymous novel by Humphrey Cobb.[3] Set during World War I, the film stars Kirk Douglas as Colonel Dax, the commanding officer of French soldiers who refuse to continue a suicidal attack, after which Dax attempts to defend them against a charge of cowardice in a court-martial.

[...]

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Response to sl8 (Reply #9)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:34 PM

12. I just rewatched that one on Criterion Channel.

Hadn’t seen it in probably 25 years. Still infuriating.

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Response to sl8 (Reply #9)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 02:11 PM

35. My favorite Kubrick film.

And I love Kubrick.

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Response to sl8 (Reply #9)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 03:23 AM

52. Extraordinary film. Flawless.

Kubrick’s tightest work, frame for frame. Extraordinary performances all around.

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Response to VOX (Reply #52)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 06:01 AM

54. Tim Carey

really ran with his interpretation.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 07:22 PM

10. All quiet on the western front.. 1930

The film follows a group of German schoolboys, talked into enlisting at the beginning of World War I by their jingoistic teacher. The story is told entirely through the experiences of the young German recruits and highlights the tragedy of war through the eyes of individuals.

This one got me.. One of the first anti war, war movies I saw as a kid.. Same shit over and over again.. Old people send young people to die in war.. Will we ever learn?

Free on youtube..


m

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Response to mitch96 (Reply #10)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 06:35 AM

57. Yes. One of the best.

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Response to mitch96 (Reply #10)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 08:25 AM

61. You beat me to it!

That movie wrecked me.

Excellent, hearbreaking, not one you can see and put aside.

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Response to Coventina (Reply #61)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 12:40 PM

67. The last scene just knocked me out.. nt

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 08:42 PM

13. Catch 22.



read and saw the original movie. That and Dr. Strangelove are still 2 of the most important war films to me.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #13)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:23 PM

24. Just watched Catch-22 the other night.

Great movie, but I like the book better.

And yes, Strangelove is great too. But I really like Kubrick, so my opinion is biased.

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Response to trev (Reply #24)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 11:00 PM

47. I cannot see anyone but Alan Arkin as Yossarian.


May have just the time period that I saw it in, tho I have watched it several times since.

But..yes...the book was a great read.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #13)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:15 AM

76. One of my all time faves. Great screenplay by Buck Henry

A very difficult book to make into a movie. I watched it again not too long ago with my wife who’d never seen it. I realized it’s really a great commentary on modern office culture.

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Response to underpants (Reply #76)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 12:44 PM

90. I had forgotten the Buck Henry bit....


excellent job.

I read a sort of memoir by alan arkin. He is extremely intelligent, turns out.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #90)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 01:03 PM

92. Have to look that up

Buck Henry created “Get Smart” with Mel Brooks too

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #13)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:23 PM

131. I read CATCH-22 in 1966-67...


!!!!

Saw both of those when they came out...

I';m THAT old !!

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Response to pangaia (Reply #131)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 07:17 PM

136. I read Catch-22 in Vietnam in 1967. Laughed so hard I annoyed those in the vicinity.

The first movie was a mild disappointment; I haven't seen the second one.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #136)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 09:57 PM

139. Can't imagine a more surreal place to read that book.


Except maybe WW2 Europe.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #139)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 10:53 PM

140. You're right...sometimes I think my life was designed by Salvador Dali

On the way to Vietnam, I picked up the novel "Candy" at the San Francisco airport and giggled all the way across the Pacific. As the TWA 707 started unloading at Tan Sohn Nhut Airport in Saigon, "What's New Pussycat?" by Tom Jones was playing over the intercom. After that, things really got weird.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #140)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 11:50 PM

141. My brother went in '68.


My ex-spouse went in '64.

2 different wars, they both said.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #141)

Mon Jun 17, 2019, 07:31 AM

148. I'm sure that's true. I was there from Dec 66 to Dec 67.

Just missed the Tet offensive.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)


Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 09:05 PM

15. The Best Years of Our Lives

Be sure to have a box of kleenex handy

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Response to diva77 (Reply #15)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 01:36 PM

32. Yes. All time classic. nt

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Response to diva77 (Reply #15)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 07:58 AM

108. For the aftermath of war, it is a powerful movie! No other came closer to show

me what my parents (Greatest Generation) dealt with upon returning to 'normal life" after WWll.

And I got to meet and hang with Harold Russell -the hand-less actor who plays Homer in the film- at several disability conferences. What a great, funny guy he was!

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Response to FailureToCommunicate (Reply #108)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 08:46 PM

121. WOW!!! What an inspiration Harold Russell was (is) and how amazing that you got to meet him!!

Thanks for sharing your story!

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Response to FailureToCommunicate (Reply #108)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 11:58 PM

143. In the mid 80s, I attended a WH Conference on the Handicapped

in DC, Harold Russell was a speaker, also Tony Coelho and Edward Kennedy Jr. A few seats above us in the audience was his father, Sen. Ted Kennedy who stood up to applause. Nice event, so glad I was able to go, (the boss almost didn't approve it) esp. to see Harold Russell; my parents were also in the greatest generation.

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #143)

Mon Jun 17, 2019, 07:10 PM

149. Harold was on my father's board. Maybe it

was the Presidents Committee On Employment of People with Disabilities conference you attended? Thanks for that clip. Those few moments, Homer’s mother’s reaction to his missing hands... and the later scene in the bedroom with his girlfriend always get to me. That scene could have been my mother and father. (Dad was missing both arms) But luckily for me, and my four brothers, love prevailed over appearances.

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Response to FailureToCommunicate (Reply #149)

Wed Jun 19, 2019, 11:25 AM

159. Yes, the invitation I received was from the Pres. Committee.

At the time I was working at a small United Way agency for the visually impaired in Bethesda, Md. and with the National Eye Institue at nearby NIH. We assisted clients with age related eye conditions and other health issues- diabetes, MS, stroke, Aids, infections, etc.

I was delighted to be invited and to attend the conference, seeing these notables was so special. My dad was a WWII veteran, 7th Army, Rhineland Campaign and although he was listed KIA twice, he wasn't physically injured in combat.

I also love that scene of Homer and Wilma and her parents. Was your father in the disability field or a veteran?

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #159)

Wed Jun 19, 2019, 07:52 PM

160. Wow, you dad was listed KIA but returned okay? That must have been a shock! My

father was an armless veteran who was asked by Pres Truman to form a group to help returning vets with employment, and re-entry into society. He also convened the committee that developed the first ANSI standards for accessiblity in late 1950's. Probably his proudest moment was opening the ceremony with President Bush for the signing of the ADA in July 1990 surrounded by hundreds of disability civil rights activists and Congressional leaders in the effort to pass the legislation. A splendid day!

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Response to diva77 (Reply #15)

Tue Jun 18, 2019, 07:54 PM

155. I was looking to see if anyone listed this one.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Tue Jun 11, 2019, 09:11 PM

16. Pink Floyd: The Wall




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Response to Doc_Technical (Reply #16)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:07 AM

83. Good one - Roger Waters' father died in WWII. The movie is partially autobiographical in that sense

He is vehemently anti-war.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)


Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 06:43 AM

20. Not movies, but of good series...

Battle 360: War in the Pacific, follows the aircraft carrier Enterprise thru the war in the Pacific Theater in WW2.

Band of Brothers...no explanation necessary

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Response to The Figment (Reply #20)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 07:45 PM

138. Thanks for the recommendation. I didn't know Battle 360: War in the Pacific existed

I'll have to try to find it. My mother's youngest brother was a junior officer on the Enterprise for (I think) the entirety of World War II. His older brother was also at the Battle of Midway (I don't remember which ship). My father, too, had two younger brothers serving in the Pacific during the war.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 07:05 AM

21. Let me at least give a mention to "A Bridge too Far"

When that was shot, 1977 or so, I was living nearby Arnhem where the movie was being shot, so I feel I have a bit of a personal stake in this, I think. When the movie finally came out, it was lukewarmly received because the era of the all star cast war movie was kind of over, plus what with Vietnam and all, we were tired of the subject.

But I recently saw it again on Blueray and it's a much, much better movie than I remembered. It has a near-visceral impact in places and it treats everybody involved with respect instead of treating the Germans as cartoon monster bad guys. Shame it had to pander to Hollywood by adding in an American unit that wasn't actually involved in the whole thing but that's par for the course. I suppose I should be glad they didn't capture an Enigma machine while they were there.

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Response to Ron Obvious (Reply #21)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 11:04 PM

48. Haven't seen the movie...thnx for rec.



I read the book.....ages ago.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #48)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 05:14 PM

96. The Devil's Birthday

The battle for the bridges at Arnheim. Title of a book by a British historian, "Foreword by General Sir John Hackett"
A methodical and searing study in institutional hubris.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:25 PM

25. And from a British viewpoint

The Cruel Sea.

From the German view, Das Boot.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:29 PM

26. PLATOON.....

Oliver Stone's Masterpiece about an Army platoon in Vietnam.

This film was so iconic for me, Vietnam veterans I know could not see this one because it was too real for them.

Others from that era.....
The Deer Hunter
Boys in Company C
Full Metal Jacket


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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:32 PM

27. "Platoon", "The Boys In Company C", "Hamburger Hill"...

 

..."Jarhead", and "Generation Kill"...

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Response to ADX (Reply #27)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 11:57 PM

142. The Boys in Company C

An underrated gem.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:45 PM

29. Coming Home.

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Response to OregonBlue (Reply #29)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 11:07 PM

49. YES!!!!



I cried all the way thru...at the theater....hit very close to home.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #49)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 09:22 AM

62. Mee too. Great anti-war movie.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 12:53 PM

30. "The Americanization of Emily" "Born on the Fouth of July"

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 02:04 PM

34. Go Tell the Spartans

Vietnam War

Burt Lancaster stars

Anti-war film set during the early years of U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Reply #34)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:46 PM

103. I'll second that one

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 03:18 PM

36. The Big Red One

All Quiet on the Western Front

Apocalypse Now

12 O'Clock High

Gettysburg

Glory

The Lost Battalion (TV show. Available on YouTube)

Why hasn't there been a good film about the Revolutionary War?

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Response to sarge43 (Reply #36)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 09:41 AM

112. The Patriot, Mel Gibson, Heath Ledger, only one I know which is sad.

The Last of the Mohicans (1992) Daniel Day Lewis, set in 1757 during the French and Indian War and based on the novel by James Fenimore Cooper.

The Alamo, 2004 Billy Bob Thornton; 1960 John Wayne.

'Indian Wars' movies? Spanish American War movies?

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #112)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 10:03 AM

114. 'Indian Wars'

Fort Apache?

Spanish American War - got nothing.

The Last of the Mohicans, tragically ignored film.

The Patriot, both sides deserved better

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #112)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:32 PM

132. I can't stand Mel Gibson. :))))



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Response to pangaia (Reply #132)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 07:18 PM

137. Yeah, same. I almost noted that, but here it's a given! Mel,

the Ragin' Racist...

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 03:22 PM

37. twelve o'clock high and the blue max. nt

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Response to NCjack (Reply #37)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 05:37 PM

42. The Blue Max is a great look at the class system

It's sad watching Stachel unravel largely because of social pressures.

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Response to NCjack (Reply #37)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 05:50 PM

45. Gregory Peck's "Pretend you're already dead" speech in "Twelve O'Clock High."

Required viewing.

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Response to Paladin (Reply #45)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 06:34 AM

55. Reminds of a story from my uncle, who was an army paratrooper in WWII. He was a

plain spoken truthful country boy of 18 from a farm in Oklahoma. With war almost over, his green battalion was in the air and half way to Norway to battle hardened Nazi troops. The colonel was in his plane, stood up, and gave a short speech. "Men, the way to get through this is -- think of yourself as already dead." Then, he turned to my uncle and and loudly said: "Private, do you think of yourself as already dead?" My uncle loudly replied: "No sir -- If I did, I wouldn't go." Next, a lucky break. The attack was cancelled and the planes returned to their base in France due to a "cease fire" order. Three days, the end of WWII was officially declared.

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Response to NCjack (Reply #55)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 07:50 AM

59. Great story. You need to see "The Cold Blue" documentary, now on HBO.

New footage of the 8th Air Force's WWII bombing raids in Europe, narrated by a few of the remaining 90-year-old veterans who took part in it. Very serious stuff.

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Response to NCjack (Reply #37)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 09:44 PM

46. Twelve O'Clock High is shown in military leadership schools.

Twelve O'Clock High is shown in military leadership schools.

Great movie!

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 03:30 PM

38. Letters from Iwo Jima.

Tells the Japenese side of the war.

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Response to Texasgal (Reply #38)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 03:33 PM

39. That movie

& Flags of Our Fathers share a few scenes, gets me every time.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 03:56 PM

40. Although considered lightweight entertainment...War Games.

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Response to Lars39 (Reply #40)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:11 PM

126. There is another movie called The War Game.

It is decidedly NOT lightweight.

If you can find a copy to watch, do so. It will curl your hair.

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Response to nocoincidences (Reply #126)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:19 PM

128. Thanks for the recommendation!

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Response to Lars39 (Reply #128)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:21 PM

130. You're welcome.

Brace yourself because it isn't an easy one to watch.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 05:35 PM

41. War Horse

The Great Raid

We Were Soldiers

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 05:40 PM

43. The Train.

John Frankenheimer never quite made a great film, but he sure made some good movies.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Wed Jun 12, 2019, 05:43 PM

44. The Burmese Harp...

and Fires on the Plain.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 02:21 AM

50. Paths of Glory, Dr Strangelove, Full Metal Jacket.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 03:17 AM

51. The Killing Fields

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 03:37 AM

53. Sidney Lumet's "The Hill," although you MUST use captioning, as the Brit-slang is thick & fast.

Still, a tense and sobering film. Some of Sean Connery’s best work.

“Paths of Glory,” mentioned many times upthread, and deservedly so.

An honorable-mention wild card: “Fury.” Has its fair share of cliches, but it’s nevertheless powerful and beautifully shot. I was surprised at how much it affected me. Brad Pitt underplays, and he’s excellent.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 06:34 AM

56. Das Boot.

Terrifyingly real.

You can get it in English, but I prefer the subtitled one.

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Response to cwydro (Reply #56)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 10:11 AM

64. Behind the scenes fun-fact:

The main cast members of Das Boot all spoke fluent English, so when it came time to dub the film into English, each character dubbed his own role. That eliminated the sometimes incongruous voice-character match-ups that can ruin a dub-job.

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Response to Aristus (Reply #64)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 12:36 PM

66. Probably easier that way. For the comedy "Norseman" each speaking scene was filmed twice...

...first in Norwegian, then in English.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norsemen_%28TV_series%29


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Response to Aristus (Reply #64)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 03:56 PM

69. Interesting.

I remember thinking it was a good dub, but I still preferred the German version.

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Response to cwydro (Reply #69)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 04:10 PM

70. Me too. I like to practice my German by watching without the subtitles.

One of the reasons the dub is so good is that German and English have so many similarities. Not surprising, since the two languages have a common ancestor.

The English word 'headquarters' is very similar to the analogous German work 'hauptquartieren', and even have the same abbreviation, HQ. Things like this make it easier to match mouth movements when dubbing from one language to the other.

There's one especially jarring moment in the fim regarding language. During the drunken party that opens the film, the battle-fatigued sub commander Tomsen inexplicably bursts out into English for one line: "I'm in no condition to fuck!"

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Response to Aristus (Reply #70)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 04:25 PM

71. Ha! I remember that!

But I doubt I even noticed it at the time! How funny.

Great movie.

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Response to cwydro (Reply #56)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 01:03 PM

68. I think so too.

The author of the novel didn't think the movie's anti-war message hit hard enough.

But I think it was terrifyingly real too.

The men are trapped in a nightmarishly claustrophobic submarine, but they are also trapped in a bloody ideology of German nationalism, white supremacy, and antisemitism.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 07:42 AM

58. "The Island on Bird Street". Obscure little gem of a movie

It's about a young Jewish kid who hides out in the Warsaw ghetto as it's being destroyed by the Germans. Incredible movie. Hard to find--I saw it a long time ago on Netflix. Well worth looking for.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 08:23 AM

60. All Quiet on the Western Front.

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Response to Coventina (Reply #60)

Tue Jun 18, 2019, 07:55 PM

156. Awesome book and movies

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 09:36 AM

63. Reprise: Glory and Gettysburg...

Glory for the racial aspect treating the first large scale use of black troops in the US. The dynamic between Denzel Washington and Morgan Freeman is award worthy.

Both for their treatment of Civil War combat. They fought differently back then.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 10:16 AM

65. Couldn't keep watching Fireflies...

very brutal.

Saw parts of How Johnny got his gun in the Metallica filmclip... very brutal as well.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 05:26 PM

72. The Longest Day.

One of the last big films shot in B&W. That made a big difference to me.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2019, 06:26 PM

73. Shoah, Night and Fog ..

and the long BBC series The World at War.

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Response to kwassa (Reply #73)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 08:26 AM

109. Yes, I agree, "Night and Fog" see post #107 for more information on this film.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 03:39 AM

74. Gallipoli and Dunkirk

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:10 AM

75. Stalag 17

Billy Wilder and William Holden, great stuff!

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:21 AM

77. Das Boot.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:24 AM

78. 'Facism in Europe' - vintage Rick Steves 1.5 hour special. Understated,

clear concrete image examples, with a real 'felt' sense - of the development of facism in Italy and Germany in particular.

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Response to empedocles (Reply #78)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:31 AM

79. He has talked about this on his radio broadcasts as well

Thanks, I didn't know about the videos.

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Response to irisblue (Reply #79)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:35 AM

81. That video readily available PBS, etc.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:33 AM

80. Johnny Got His Gun.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:05 AM

82. Slaughterhouse 5, The Zookeeper's Wife, Divided We Fall and The Hurt Locker. Plot details:

Slaughterhouse Five - centers around the bombing of Dresden
The Zookeeper's Wife - couple helps Jews escape from Nazi imprisonment
Divided We Fall - a Czech couple hide their Jewish friend from Nazis. The husband is a Nazi collaborator, but hates Nazis and only does so to feed his wife and child.
the Hurt Locker - experiences of a U.S. explosives ordnance disposal team during the Iraq War.

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Response to kysrsoze (Reply #82)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:36 PM

133. Finally, somebody mentioned SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE...

If it was missed, I would have posted it.


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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:09 AM

84. Almost forgot - American Sniper. I watched thinking it would be too much war glorification. It was

much the opposite, IMO.

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Response to kysrsoze (Reply #84)

Wed Jun 19, 2019, 08:08 PM

161. I didn't watch it, thinking that it was at least glorifying Chris Kyle.

Who was a murderous psychopath.

There's nothing noble about someone who enjoys killing innocent men, women, and children and wishes he could do it again.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:21 AM

85. The Dawn Patrol

1938. Basil Rathbone, Erroll Flynn and David Niven. 1915 pilots lost in battle. Flynn becomes commander and learns of Rathbone's angst at losing his men.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:27 AM

86. Sergeant York....

.....and GOOD MORNING VIETNAM!!
https://m.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 10:28 AM

87. Paths of Glory (nt)

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 11:37 AM

88. Dunkirk

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 12:29 PM

89. Two more recent ones

In the Valley of Elah.

Green Zone.

Both show how splendidly the war in Iraq was for those of us who served.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 12:59 PM

91. Slaughterhouse Five

A Children's Crusade

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 03:02 PM

93. So many movies on War. Makes you wonder why we never learn.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 03:22 PM

94. Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb

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Response to masmdu (Reply #94)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 05:46 PM

117. Greatest movie satire, evah!

And all too true for those of us who grew up in the era of Mutually Assured Destruction.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 03:49 PM

95. Defiance (2008) IMDB: 7.2/10

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 05:58 PM

97. Come and see

Surprised no ones mentioned it, unique movie from the Soviet era. Although funded by the party they let the director have unprecedented control over it, and to this date it's one of the most brutal war movie ever made.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 08:42 PM

100. Bridge Over the River Kwai...

...and, A Bridge Too Far.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 08:54 PM

101. The Red Badge of Courage

It's not really anti-war. But the cinematography, direction, acting and Audie Murphy's performance are the best.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Fri Jun 14, 2019, 09:45 PM

102. Life is Beautiful

Saw it in the theater three times with different friends.

We all cried. Every. Single. Time.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 04:56 AM

105. Wag the Dog

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wag_the_Dog

A war (Iran) to distract voters from a presidential scandal (obstruction impeachment). Unfolding now?

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 07:45 AM

106. More, some with the civilian side,

Watch on the Rhine (1943), Bette Davis, Paul Lukas. A German, his American wife and children leave disrupted Europe in 1940 for America where they become involved in wartime intrigue. Based on Lillian Hellman's 1941 screenplay.

Casablanca, 1942, Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henri. Classic WWII drama and love story set in Vichy French Morocco.

The Stranger, 1946, suspense drama, Orson Welles first film noir, Loretta Young. A war crimes investigator traces a high ranking Nazi fugitive to a Conn. town just after the war.

The Sorrow and the Pity, 1969 documentary by Marcel Ophuls about the collaboration between the Vichy government and Nazis in France and the French Resistance. Interviews with a Nazi officer, collaborators and Resistance workers.

Tender Comrade, 1943, Ginger Rogers, Robert Ryan. Women at the homefront work and live communally while their husbands are at war.

The More the Merrier, 1943, Jean Arthur, Joel McCrea, Chas. Coburn. Comedy focusing on the wartime housing shortage in Washington, DC, George Stevens.

From Here to Eternity, 1953 Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Cliff, Donna Reed, personal drama among soldiers stationed in Hawaii just before the Pearl Harbor WII attack there.

Pearl Harbor, Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett, 2001. Romantic WWII period drama in Hawaii at the time of the 1941 Japanese attack.

Sophie's Choice, 1982, Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline, Set in Brooklyn, 1947 drama based around WWII Holocaust survivor, Sophie.

The Pianist, 2002 drama, Polish musician struggles and survives in the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII.

Tea with Mussolini, 1999, semi autobiographical film about a young boy (Franco Zeffirelli) growing up in fascist WWII Italy with a group of English and American women. Judi Dench, Joan Plowright, Cher.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 07:57 AM

107. Night and Fog, 32 minutes- Documentary on Nazi Concentration Camps.

Last edited Sat Jun 15, 2019, 09:15 PM - Edit history (4)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048434/

My review of this film at Internet Movie Data Base, (IMBD)

Night and Fog, 1956, 32 minutes

The Most Powerful Film Ever Made



If you want to describe or give your audience a feeling for the holocaust, or "Man's Inhumanity To Man", then this is the vehicle to use. Show it..be warned, it is so powerful, that you will never forget what you see, neither will any of your viewers. It is impossible to describe, intermixing l955 footage of Auschwitz Concentration Camp, with captured Nazi footage which the allies found at the end of the war, and the scenes of American and British troops liberating the camps...In French, with English subtitles.. and scenes that are unforgettable and horrific. Even the sad music of death from this film plays in my ears, and I have not seen it in 15 years. Once you hear it, you will know.

This is the one to show if you want people to understand the truth of what happened and the reason for its reaction in today's current events....It is shocking in a special way. I showed it to my classes. Students were warned, and told what was coming, they said it would be "nothing" By the end some were crying and moaning in horror...

__________________________________________________________________________________________

If you read the first 10 reviews of this film at the site above, you will see that there are a number of reviewers who say this is the most powerful film ever made. Also, the difficulty of watching this movie is repeated over and over in the reviews. It is available to buy or show...It is also most probably available at a public library near where you live. You have been warned. You will never forget this film. 32 minutes, 1956

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #107)

Tue Jun 18, 2019, 06:21 PM

153. Your post caused me to watch it. Sixty-four years later and still unbelievable.

It brings home the horror of the fact that we are building concentration camps here, not extermination camps yet, of course, but a slippery slope is certainly underway.

That orange beast needs to rot in prison.

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Response to NNadir (Reply #153)

Tue Jun 18, 2019, 07:52 PM

154. Thank You for watching .."Night and Fog" It is unbelievable..but, and most people won't believe

what I am going to say, that happened again in Cambodia in the mid 70s. The Cambodian Communists (Khmer Rouge ), killed more than 2,000,000 people while they were in power. Their leader was Pol Pot. According to someone I talked to today, (6/18/19, about 7 hours ago, ) those killing fields where that was carried out, have been left as they were with the stench and the bones of humans around. It was left that way as a reminder of what humans are capable of. An incredible memorial to those who were killed.

... When I showed "Night and Fog" ( from the mid 70s till 95) it was my belief that that kind of killing could never happen again. But it has happened again, and I was totally wrong. It is very sad. If anyone reads this, watch.. "Night and Fog ." Let us pass this to our children and our children's children so it never happens again. Never.!!!

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #154)

Tue Jun 18, 2019, 08:06 PM

157. Oh, I know. Bosnia was no picnic either. I think though, that the holocaust is notable...

...because it was industrialized and, irrespective of all the "I didn't know" claims, pretty much done openly.

In the DVD I watched, there was a 1994 interview with Resnais in which he described how the film was almost cut ten minutes by French censors since it showed a French policeman in Pithiviers rounding up Jews. He saved the ten minutes by editing the film to obscure the French policeman's hat.

I have no doubt that left unfettered, Trump could very well make it happen here again. All it takes is making racism seem "normal."

And it did happen here, with African Americans and Native Americans.

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Response to NNadir (Reply #157)

Tue Jun 18, 2019, 08:17 PM

158. Yes, you are correct: African Americans and Native Americans.

The murder of Native Americans was discussed in a book called, "Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee" by Dee Brown. Most people in the U.S.A. do not know about the destruction of the Native Americans..actually, there were hundreds of groups of Native Americans that ranged from Maine, through Florida and the mid west, and in Texas and the West. The destruction of those people (Native American Nations) is one of the saddest and horrific stories in American History. Millions were killed. You are correct..This did happen here
.........and most people here do not know it. (and many people in the U.S.A. now could care less)..

I have to be totally honest. I tried to read "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" but couldn't get halfway through. After the massacre at "Sand Creek" (about half way through the book) I just could not read any more.

Warning: If you read all at the link below, you may not sleep tonight. Yes it is horrific, and it happened here in the U.S.A. carried out by the U.S. Cavalry. And, yes it did happen!! When? November 29, 1864. Where?..in a place called ..."Colorado"
Of course you didn't know, no one tried to teach this to you. Not a positive reflection on United States History. again ..Warning: this is sad and horrific reading.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_Creek_massacre

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 08:39 AM

110. Last of the Mohicans

Mister Roberts

Thirty Seconds over Tokyo

The Steel Helmet

Northwest Passage

Eye of the Needle

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 08:50 AM

111. More

- October, Ten Days That Shook the World (1928), Sergei Eisenstein. Soviet, silent celebratory and historical film about the October 1917 Revolution ten years after the event in Russia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/October:_Ten_Days_That_Shook_the_World

- A Farewell to Arms (1932), Gary Cooper, Helen Hayes based on the Ernest Hemingway story. An American ambulance driver and a British nurse fall in love during the First World War in Europe.

- For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943) Gary Cooper, Ingrid Bergman. Based on the Ernest Hemingway novel of 1940. The story of an American adventurer allied with Republican guerilla forces during the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s. He falls in love and manages to carry out a dangerous mission to blow up a strategic bridge in Segovia in southern Spain.

- The Great Dictator, (1940) American political satire comedy-drama film written, directed, produced, scored by, and starring British comedian Charlie Chaplin, following the tradition of many of his other films. Chaplin's film advanced a stirring condemnation of Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, fascism, antisemitism, and the Nazis. At the time of its first release, the United States was still formally at peace with Nazi Germany. Chaplin plays both leading roles: a ruthless fascist dictator and a persecuted Jewish barber..
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Dictator

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 09:55 AM

113. Grave of the Fireflies

 

That's one of the most depressing movies ever made as well. It makes its point.

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Response to Liberalhammer (Reply #113)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 10:54 AM

115. It took me 3 days and a box of kleenex to watch it.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 12:54 PM

116. Born on the fourth of July

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 05:48 PM

118. The Enemy Below

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 06:32 PM

119. Fury - Brad Pitt, Shia LeBeouf, WWII tank crew drama

edge of my seat combat scenes
horrors and heroism of war depicted well

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Response to Maine-i-acs (Reply #119)

Wed Jun 19, 2019, 08:13 PM

162. I was a tank crewman in the Gulf in 1991.

And although my unit didn't serve in combat, one thing "Fury" got right was the constant bickering that goes on among tank crewmen.

A lot of war movies forward this idea that men in war are all brothers in arms who grow to love one another, even more so than with family. "Fury" shows that that isn't necessarily so, and I can confirm it. None of my crew of four liked each other very much. And when we weren't on duty, we pretty much went our own ways and did our own things.

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Response to Aristus (Reply #162)

Thu Jun 20, 2019, 02:08 PM

163. thanks for your service

I doubt I would even survive Basic much less deployment to a hot zone.
but I can only imagine what a few days in a confined metal box in the desert heat with a few other guys will do to their temperament.

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Response to Maine-i-acs (Reply #163)

Thu Jun 20, 2019, 02:14 PM

164. Well, we disliked each other before we were deployed to the Gulf.

So the circumstances didn't help.

But I was never claustrophobic, so the closed -in space didn't bother me.

A good thing, too. One of the tasks we had to accomplish during our five-day desert training exercise after we arrived was spend an entire day in the tank, buttoned up (all hatches closed). Test our endurance. That took a great deal of patience, as you may imagine.

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Response to Aristus (Reply #164)

Thu Jun 20, 2019, 02:19 PM

165. i can't even pee if a guy's in the adjacent urinal

If I was there they would have buried me in the sand after about 3 hours IMO

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sat Jun 15, 2019, 07:36 PM

120. Charlotte Gray and Little Big Man. nt

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:16 AM

123. I saw a South Korean film a couple of years ago on Netflix

Called "The Northern Limit Line"

It's based on a true incident that happened a couple of decades ago between coastal patrol ships between the Koreas. Each side is patrolling the maritime border between their countries and protecting their fishing fleets.

The first half is the crew of a SK patrol boat getting up to speed with a new commander, I think. Then there's the incident.

I don't want to spoil anything, but I remember it being good.

Plus all the other films already mentioned.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 11:53 AM

124. Zulu. Michael Caine's first film.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 05:54 PM

125. I saw several in my "Film and War" class.

Coming Home, Apoc. Now, and The Deer Hunter.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:13 PM

127. Threads and Testament

Both very powerful depictions of a world after Nuclear War.

Also:

The Day After....similar to threads.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:20 PM

129. Soldier Blue

This movie damn near broke my heart.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 06:37 PM

134. Go find some real WWI footage.....

its not for the squeamish. Our archives has some but there is plenty.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Sun Jun 16, 2019, 07:15 PM

135. The greatest anti-war movie ever

By the same Australian who had a hit with Gallipoli, it is a movie about the Boer War called Breaker Morant.
It is a graphic, realistic portrayal of war and the patriotic motives of those who fight, but by the end it is a compelling indictment of war and the death penalty. It is based on a true story and the book that was written by one of the major characters in the movie.

Can’t recommend it enough. Google it for more info.

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Response to SCantiGOP (Reply #135)

Thu Jun 20, 2019, 06:28 PM

167. Love it

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Mon Jun 17, 2019, 12:01 AM

144. Born on the Fourth of July; Rome, Open City; Empire of the Sun

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Mon Jun 17, 2019, 12:01 AM

145. King of Hearts

This film focuses on the farce of war through the eyes of the mentally ill.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Mon Jun 17, 2019, 12:04 AM

146. Ken Burns PBS series on WWII

This series really spoke to me, maybe because I was a child during WWII and can remember the stars people put in their windows, neighbors who lost sons, a neighbor who was widow with a small child after her husband was killed. My uncle fought in the Battle of the Bulge and would not talk about it. When you watch this series, you see the bravery of our soldiers and the horrors they had to bear.

I get so mad when I see right wing nationalism on display now,, or worse, defended by our clueless president. That is what started WWII and there should be no place for this in our current society.

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Response to dem in texas (Reply #146)

Mon Jun 17, 2019, 08:16 PM

151. Everyone should know the horrors of WWII (especially Soviets, 26,000,000 killed)

Soviet Union lost how many?..26 million. What the Soviet Union went through is unbelievable. But that is war, and the horrors of war. I have not seen this series, but I know that Burns tells it objectively and honestly. I am sure that there is a lot about the Soviet losses during the war. Horrific in ways that are unbelievable .

read this article below:

Soviet Union Saved the World from Hitler:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/05/08/dont-forget-how-the-soviet-union-saved-the-world-from-hitler/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.541d11383b49..........................................................

"By one calculation, for every single American soldier killed fighting the Germans, 80 Soviet soldiers died doing the same"........................from this article:


from wikepedia:

The Soviet Union paid the harshest price: though the numbers are not exact, an estimated 26 million Soviet citizens died during World War II, including as many as 11 million soldiers.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Mon Jun 17, 2019, 07:29 AM

147. Lots of good references

listed here. Two I didn't see listed are the HBO series The Pacific and the movie Enemy at the Gates. As my father served in the pacific on a destroyer and was at Guadalcanal, Savo Island and other battles, I watched with rapt attention. The combat scenes are intense and there are a lot of them.
Having been to Russia, I found Enemy at the Gates very interesting.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)

Mon Jun 17, 2019, 08:03 PM

150. The Anderson Platoon ..best documentary, won oscar, 1967,

The director, a French veteran of the Indochina war (La 317e Section), returned to follow a platoon of American soldiers for six weeks at the height of fighting in Vietnam in 1966. The documentary discusses the background and fate of the soldiers and emphasizes how much American culture pervades the soldiers' behaviors in the midst of jungle life and fighting.......

Keep in mind, this is real war. Not something made up. A documentary, if you haven't seen it, watch it.

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Response to irisblue (Original post)


Response to irisblue (Original post)

Thu Jun 20, 2019, 04:07 PM

166. Charlie Wilson's War

The behind the scenes financing and political maneuvering is where the most cynical calculations of whose lives matter and by how much originate.

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