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Mon Aug 12, 2013, 04:04 AM

August 12: Julienne Fries Day

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Reply August 12: Julienne Fries Day (Original post)
Sherman A1 Aug 2013 OP
olddots Aug 2013 #1
Sherman A1 Aug 2013 #2
antiquie Aug 2013 #3
kwassa Aug 2013 #4

Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Mon Aug 12, 2013, 04:26 AM

1. " Thousands of Julienne Fries "

 

get out the VEGO --MATIC !!!

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Response to olddots (Reply #1)

Mon Aug 12, 2013, 04:44 AM

2. +1

It slices, it dices, it chops, it peels................

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Mon Aug 12, 2013, 10:47 AM

3. Thank you, Julia.

 



The term was brought to the forefront of American pop culture by Ron Popeil’s commercials for the Veg-O-Matic, “It slices! It dices! It makes Julienne fries!” Urban legend indicates the word is derived from Julia Child.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Mon Aug 12, 2013, 10:59 AM

4. And who was Julienne Fries, anyways?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julienning


The first known use of the term in print is in François Massialot's Le Cuisinier Royal et Bourgeois (1722 edition).[1] The origin of the term is uncertain, but may derive from the proper name Jules or Julien. A potage julienne is composed of carrots, beets, leeks, celery, lettuce, sorrel, and chervil cut in strips a half-ligne in thickness and about eight or ten lignes in length. The onions are cut in half and sliced thinly to give curved sections, the lettuce and sorrel minced, in what a modern recipe would term en chiffonade.[2] The root vegetables are briefly sauteed, then all are simmered in stock and the julienne is ladled out over a slice of bread.

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