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Mon Jul 20, 2015, 07:44 PM

The Growing Middle Class in South America and Mexico

From a new Pew Research Center report titled A Global Middle Class Is More Promise than Reality (pp. 36-7):

In South America, booming commodity prices and income redistribution policies helped spur the growth of populations that are middle income and upper-middle income. Some countries, such as Argentina and Chile, transformed from being majority low income or poor in 2001 to being majority middle income or better in 2011. Brazil ended the decade close to this tipping point. Mexico kept pace with its neighbors to the south, joining the ranks of countries in which about a quarter (26%) of the population is middle income.

The 10 countries from South America included in this study represent nearly 100% of the regionís population. These countries and Mexico realized noticeable growth in their populations that are middle income and upper-middle income. In 2001, the middle-income share of the population was 20% or higher in only four countries. By 2011, this was true in Mexico and in nine of the 10 countries in South America.

The most notable growth in the middle-income population was in Argentina, where the share more than doubled from 15% in 2001 to 32% in 2011. Sizable growth also occurred in Ecuador (up from 8% to 21%), Colombia (11% to 21%), Peru (14% to 25%), Brazil (18% to 28%), and Venezuela (20% to 30%). The share in Mexico increased from 17% to 26% during the first decade of the 21st century. Similarly, the share of the populations that are upper-middle income climbed into the double digits in 10 of the 11 countries by 2011, compared with four countries in 2001. Argentina again led the way: those who are upper-middle income constituted 7% of the population in 2001 and 24% in 2011. Significant changes also took place in Uruguay, where the share increased from 20% to 30%, and in Chile where the share rose from 15% to 23%.

Collectively, the 11 Latin American countries highlighted in this section added 63 million people to the global middle income population from 2001 to 2011, accounting for 16% of the global increase. They also added 36 million to the global population of those who are upper-middle income, which amounted to 20% of the increase worldwide. Somewhat ironically, the share of these countries in the global middle-income population fell from 19% in 2001 to 18% in 2011, a side effect of Chinaís dominance in the global trend. But their global share of those who are upper-middle income did increase, rising from 9% to 13% over the course of the centuryís first decade (Note: Latin America represents 9% of the world's population).

The countries in South America and Mexico are still some distance from having fully acquired middle-income status, however. Nearly two-thirds or more of the populations in Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico and Peru was poor or low income in 2011. And, generally speaking, South American countries are not yet in the same place as Eastern Europe with respect to developing middle-income or more well-to-do populations.

Report: http://www.pewglobal.org/files/2015/07/Global-Middle-Class-Report_FINAL_7-8-15.pdf

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Reply The Growing Middle Class in South America and Mexico (Original post)
forest444 Jul 2015 OP
Judi Lynn Jul 2015 #1
Bacchus4.0 Jul 2015 #2

Response to forest444 (Original post)

Tue Jul 21, 2015, 04:34 AM

1. Extraordinary news, considering all the noise we've heard from the troll gallery

regarding how leftist leaders have destroyed life for the parasitic oligarchies of Latin America as they knew it, pretending the people, themselves were faring poorly.

From the Pew report you've shared, another fascinating reference:

[center]~ ~ ~ Sizable growth also occurred in Ecuador (up from 8% to 21%), Colombia (11% to 21%), Peru (14% to 25%), Brazil (18% to 28%), and Venezuela (20% to 30%). ~ ~ ~

Ta-daaaaaaa!

[/center]
Thank you.

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Response to forest444 (Original post)

Tue Jul 21, 2015, 05:11 AM

2. 2011, no more to be said. nt

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