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Sun Jan 24, 2016, 04:43 PM

Revenue sharing demand takes center stage at Peronist Governors' Summit in Argentina.

Eleven governors and numerous party leaders and lawmakers attended the Justicialist Party summit in the Province of San Juan (in the Argentine Andes) on Friday. Among the issues they addressed was the Supreme Court ruling last November that ordered the reimbursement of the 15% social security tax provinces had been paying back to the federal government on their revenue sharing income since 1992. Federal revenue sharing, first enacted in Argentina in 1988, reached US$44 billion in 2015.

The ruling, which pertained to a suit brought forward by three provinces (Córdoba, San Luis, and Santa Fe), prompted former President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner to extend the reimbursement to all provinces and the City of Buenos Aires, since Article 75 of the Argentine Constitution requires that federal tax rates be equal across the country. President Mauricio Macri, who has been ruling by decree since his December 10 inaugural, rescinded the order however.

President Macri, on the other hand, last week decreed a raise in the revenue sharing quota allotted to the City of Buenos Aires from 1.9% to 3.75% - an increase of nearly US$1 billion. Santa Cruz Governor Alicia Kirchner questioned the recent decision by the federal government to increase the revenue sharing quota of the City of Buenos Aires considering it “unfair.”

Governor Kirchner added that the Macri administration used the transfer of the Federal Police to the City as an “excuse” to boost the City’s share in the federal funds. “I think it has to do with the very significant borrowing by Macri when he was the City Mayor that is due this year,” said the former Minister of Social Development during the Cristina Fernández de Kirchner administration.

Over US$600 million in debt interest and amortization payments are due by the City of Buenos Aires in 2016 - more than the city's entire debt load when Macri took office as Mayor in 2007.

In tune with Alicia Kirchner’s statements, Río Negro Province Senator Miguel Ángel Pichetto said that the demand for reimbursement of 15% of the revenue sharing for all provinces was “fair,” adding the position of the federal government was “centralist” (i.e. Buenos Aires-centric).

At: http://buenosairesherald.com/article/207325/revenue-sharing-demand-takes-center-stage-at-san-juan-summit
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Centralism in favor of Buenos Aires, even to the detriment of the nation's 23 provinces, has been a fixture of Argentine conservatism through the country's 200 year history. Argentina's George Washington, Gen. José de San Martín, was in fact forced to leave the country in 1824 for refusing to support centralism (or any other regional demands).

To this day, Buenos Aires right-wingers (Macri's core base) are said to believe that “Argentina ends at the Buenos Aires beltway.” Macri's certainly proving them right.

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Response to forest444 (Original post)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 06:07 AM

1. No idea how things work, apparently.

He seems to think you just give orders in the correct, firm way and then things happen because you are so boss-like or something.

Very familiar up here in the states, that attitude. Results in things like Flint, MI.

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Response to forest444 (Original post)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 04:14 PM

2. Alicia Kirchner's right in pointing out what Macri is doing, and why.

This maneuvering will solve a big problem he created while he was the mayor, at the expense of innocent people throughout the country.

Didn't know about this horrible preoccupation by fascists with sacrificing Argentinian citizens in order to indulge the whimsy and profit of Buenos Aires politicians. Shameful.

Thanks for the background.

Also, didn't know Nestor Kirchner had a sister in government. Very nice finding out about that.

Here's a page of google images of Santa Cruz for others like me who have never seen it:

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1354&bih=657&q=santa+cruz+argentina&oq=santa+cruz+argentina&gs_l=img.3..0l3j0i5i30l2j0i30l5.2510.7817.0.8091.24.22.2.0.0.0.263.3004.0j19j1.20.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..2.21.2880.VDu6AmYAI7U

Wow! Spectacular. Unimaginable.

[center]

Santa Cruz, in the South, across from the Malvinas.[/center]

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #2)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 04:40 PM

3. Santa Cruz is a lot like Wyoming, geographically and economically (ranching, fishing, and mining)

I´ve never been any further south than Río Negro Province (which is more like Northern California), but Santa Cruz certainly has the most by way of desolate beauty in Argentina. You have a very good eye as always, Judi.

It´s probably best known for the Perito Moreno Glacier, which I believe is the only major glacier in the Americas that´s still advancing rather than receding due to climate change. Enjoy!


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Response to forest444 (Reply #3)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 05:05 PM

4. Joyous blue intensity there on a clear day. That would be overwhelming in person.

I remember with perfect clarity a glacier lake I saw as a very young person, which stays with me exactly as if I am still there.

This view would absolutely transfix you, standing somewhere along the fence barrier! The scale in all that scenery is deeply impressive.

So glad to hear there is still one growing glacier, and you gave us its name. Viva Perito Moreno Glacier.

It looks like a very substantial ice pack. Hope it will endure. It's surely needed, for spirit's sake, too!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #2)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 06:48 PM

5. Damn. nt

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Response to bemildred (Reply #5)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 11:00 PM

6. San Juan (where the summit was held) isn't bad either.

It's a different kind of beauty; more like Utah (dry and mountainous).

San Juan Province is probably best known for its Valley of the Moon. Much like Arches in Utah, it's one of those things that words can't really capture.

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Response to forest444 (Reply #6)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 11:06 PM

7. Yeah, I don't think there is any place on the planet I'd rather visit than Patagonia.

Maybe a couple of remote Islands I can think of like Kerguelen or St. Helena or the Falklands. (Oooops, now I've done it.)

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Response to bemildred (Reply #7)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 11:17 PM

8. I'm with you. I've always liked chilly, desolate places. Semi-desertic if possible.

In my younger, wilder days I considered visiting the Falklands a number of times.

Quaint, seaside villages always appealed to me, and I've always gotten on very well with Brits personally. It's always reassuring to see what personal contact can accomplish, that online exchanges (even very friendly ones) just can't.



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Response to forest444 (Reply #8)

Mon Jan 25, 2016, 11:24 PM

9. Deserts and mountains, life begins at 8000'.

All the rest is preparation.

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