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Mon May 18, 2020, 09:32 PM

Study shows fewer COVID-19 cases in high-altitude regions



Regional REGIONAL | 22h ago

Libby Stanford
Summit Daily News

People who grew up at high elevations might be less susceptible to the novel coronavirus, according to a recent study of the virus’ impact in high-altitude communities like Summit County.

The study, which was published by the “Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology” journal, compared case data for the virus among communities in Bolivia, Tibet and Ecuador and found that cities and towns in higher elevations have reported fewer COVID-19 cases.

According to Bolivia’s Ministry of Health website, La Paz, Bolivia, has reported 328 cases of the virus and Santa Cruz, Bolivia, has reported 2,300 cases as of Friday. La Paz sits 11,943 feet above sea level with a population of 2.7 million people. Santa Cruz is 1,365 feet above sea level with a population of 1.6 million people. For some context, Breckenridge is 9,600 feet above sea level.

“This is data that strongly suggests that high altitude is protective,” said Dr. Gustavo Zubieta-Calleja, director of the High Altitude Pulmonary and Pathology Institute in La Paz and one of the researchers on the study.

More:
https://www.aspentimes.com/news/regional/study-shows-fewer-covid-19-cases-in-high-altitude-regions/

Also posted in Science:
https://www.democraticunderground.com/122869506

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Reply Study shows fewer COVID-19 cases in high-altitude regions (Original post)
Judi Lynn May 18 OP
Loki Liesmith May 18 #1
LizBeth May 18 #2
niyad May 18 #3
alittlelark May 18 #4
SWBTATTReg May 18 #5
snpsmom May 18 #6
PoindexterOglethorpe May 18 #7
OregonBlue May 19 #8

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2020, 09:35 PM

1. UV?

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2020, 09:35 PM

2. Well, I am basically sea level. That leaves me out of that one.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2020, 09:36 PM

3. Since I live at over 6,200 ft., I find that a bit encouraging.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2020, 09:38 PM

4. At 7300' here.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2020, 10:14 PM

5. Yikes, and I'm 466 feet above sea level! Oh nooooooo!! Funny thing, living at such a high...

altitude will have negative impacts on those w/ breathing problems anyways, so I don't know if the trade offs is better or not...I guess it's a either this or that situation. Go one way, and catch the CV, get ill and/or die, and go the other way, and not be able to breath, and die of oxygen deprivation. Hmmmm...

What they don't say is that those that live at those altitudes do have enlarged lung capacity to handle the thinner air (on a PBS show, don't recall when/where/etc. when aired), so perhaps an overdeveloped lung capacity helps them in fighting off the CV (besides the CV, and thinner air)?

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2020, 10:24 PM

6. Goes along with reporting that

the disease looks a lot like altitude sickness.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2020, 10:49 PM

7. Aha! Excellent news

says the woman who lives at 7,000 feet.

Maybe that's part of the reason we have relatively few cases here in New Mexico. But I do want to point out that the Navajo Nation has been disproportionately affected here, which probably has a lot to do with the poverty, lack of running water, small and crowded homes.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue May 19, 2020, 11:09 AM

8. Perhaps it's just that those people have greater

lung capacity and thinner blood?

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