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Fri Aug 2, 2013, 09:29 AM

Girls commit dating violence as often as boys, studies show

Girls are the perpetrators of some form of dating violence nearly as often as boys, surprising new studies show.

More girls – 43 percent – than boys – 28 percent – reported committing an act of physical dating violence, said researchers who are presenting their findings beginning Wednesday at the American Psychological Association’s annual meeting. Slightly more boys – 23 percent – than girls – 18 percent – reported perpetrating at least one act of sexual violence.

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/girls-commit-dating-violence-often-boys-studies-show-6C10809607

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Reply Girls commit dating violence as often as boys, studies show (Original post)
Major Nikon Aug 2013 OP
intaglio Aug 2013 #1
Major Nikon Aug 2013 #2
intaglio Aug 2013 #3
Major Nikon Aug 2013 #7
intaglio Aug 2013 #16
opiate69 Aug 2013 #18
Major Nikon Aug 2013 #20
opiate69 Aug 2013 #13
lumberjack_jeff Aug 2013 #15
lumberjack_jeff Aug 2013 #19
opiate69 Aug 2013 #4
intaglio Aug 2013 #5
opiate69 Aug 2013 #6
intaglio Aug 2013 #9
Major Nikon Aug 2013 #14
Major Nikon Aug 2013 #8
intaglio Aug 2013 #10
Major Nikon Aug 2013 #11
opiate69 Aug 2013 #12
lumberjack_jeff Aug 2013 #17
nomorenomore08 Aug 2013 #22
lumberjack_jeff Aug 2013 #23
nomorenomore08 Aug 2013 #25
lumberjack_jeff Aug 2013 #27
nomorenomore08 Aug 2013 #28
lumberjack_jeff Aug 2013 #29
nomorenomore08 Aug 2013 #21
lumberjack_jeff Aug 2013 #24
nomorenomore08 Aug 2013 #26
ConcernedCanuk Aug 2013 #30

Response to Major Nikon (Original post)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 09:45 AM

1. You might want to post the spectrum of violence covered

The study looked at a spectrum of behaviors, ranging from name calling and expressing anger, spreading rumors, and using controlling behaviors such as keeping track of dating partners, to physical violence such as slapping, hitting and biting, and sexual violence including forced kissing. Taken as a whole, one in three reported being the victim of at least one of the behaviors on that spectrum.
Emphasis mine

Absolutely terrifying if you are a man and it really shows how hard done by men are



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Response to intaglio (Reply #1)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 09:57 AM

2. The study isn't about men or women


For her study, Dorothy Espelage, professor of educational psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and her colleagues conducted a longitudinal study among 625 students starting in grades 5, 6, and 7, and followed them over a period of four years. Researchers interviewed the students at intervals over that time.

While most of us may not rank name-calling, or bad-mouthing another to their friends as “violence,” the researchers say they included the psychological and relationship tactics because they can have a profound impact.

“We see in other research that the psychological stuff has just as much of a negative impact on health outcomes as the physical and sexual” violence, said Carlos Cuevas, associate professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University, who is also presenting a study on youth dating violence at meeting.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #2)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 11:22 AM

3. You are reporting that women are as violent as men in the conventional sense of violence

This is garbage as simple reading of your source article shows.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #3)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 11:57 AM

7. I reported no such thing

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #7)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 04:35 PM

16. What is the title of your thread?

I quote
Girls commit dating violence as often as boys, studies show
but you do not report for some, curious reason, what the study meant by violence which is way outside the expected definition.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #16)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 05:30 PM

18. I addressed that in post 13, snookums. (right below this, interestingly enough)... go read...

 

You might learn something.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #16)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 08:13 PM

20. "expected definition"

You are reporting that women are as violent as men in the conventional sense of violence
(emphasis mine)


wom·an
[woom-uhn] Show IPA noun, plural wom·en [wim-in] verb, adjective
noun
1. the female human being (distinguished from man ).
2. an adult female person.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/women


man
1 [man] plural men, verb, manned, man·ning, interjection
noun
1. an adult male person, as distinguished from a boy or a woman.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/man



vi·o·lence
[vahy-uh-luhns]
noun
1.swift and intense force: the violence of a storm.
2.rough or injurious physical force, action, or treatment: to die by violence.
3.an unjust or unwarranted exertion of force or power, as against rights or laws: to take over a government by violence.
4.a violent act or proceeding.
5.rough or immoderate vehemence, as of feeling or language: the violence of his hatred.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/violence

More girls – 43 percent – than boys – 28 percent – reported committing an act of physical dating violence, said researchers who are presenting their findings beginning Wednesday at the American Psychological Association’s annual meeting.

...

The study looked at a spectrum of behaviors, ranging from name calling and expressing anger, spreading rumors, and using controlling behaviors such as keeping track of dating partners, to physical violence such as slapping, hitting and biting...

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/girls-commit-dating-violence-often-boys-studies-show-6C10809607








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Response to intaglio (Reply #3)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 12:24 PM

13. Reading comprehension.. might want to bone up...

 

The article says nothing of the sort about "conventional" violence. It specifically refers to Dating violence, which just happens to be the accepted term for "domestic" violence situations, involving unmarried teenagers. (Domestic violence is generally accepted to refer to adult couples, married or not, usually co-habitating.)

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Response to intaglio (Reply #3)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 02:40 PM

15. "in the conventional sense of violence"

 

That "conventional sense" is the stereotype that this study (and several before it) should disprove.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #3)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 07:15 PM

19. Women 18-28 more frequently commit relationship violence.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1854883/

Methods. We analyzed data on young US adults aged 18 to 28 years from the 2001 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, which contained information about partner violence and injury reported by 11 370 respondents on 18761 heterosexual relationships.

Results. Almost 24% of all relationships had some violence, and half (49.7%) of those were reciprocally violent. In nonreciprocally violent relationships, women were the perpetrators in more than 70% of the cases. Reciprocity was associated with more frequent violence among women (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.9, 2.8), but not men (AOR=1.26; 95% CI=0.9, 1.7). Regarding injury, men were more likely to inflict injury than were women (AOR=1.3; 95% CI=1.1, 1.5), and reciprocal intimate partner violence was associated with greater injury than was nonreciprocal intimate partner violence regardless of the gender of the perpetrator (AOR=4.4; 95% CI=3.6, 5.5).


For the math challenged, this means that among couples with IPV, women either inflict it unilaterally or participate reciprocally in 85% of cases. Furthermore, she's more likely to be injured when they are engaged in reciprocal combat.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #1)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 11:27 AM

4. Ah, so emotional abuse is only actually abuse if the victim is female?

 

How positively enlightened of you.

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Response to opiate69 (Reply #4)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 11:47 AM

5. I did not say that, do not put words in my mouth

I responded to the inappropriate use of the word violence in the OP.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #5)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 11:55 AM

6. The reasoning was explained in the article...

 


While most of us may not rank name-calling, or bad-mouthing another to their friends as “violence,” the researchers say they included the psychological and relationship tactics because they can have a profound impact.

“We see in other research that the psychological stuff has just as much of a negative impact on health outcomes as the physical and sexual” violence, said Carlos Cuevas, associate professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University...

Further, the CDC classifies it as such as well.
http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/pub-res/ipv_surveillance/11_section34.htm

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Response to opiate69 (Reply #6)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 12:00 PM

9. And that makes the OP lack any responsibility for what he posts?

Have fun with that idea.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #9)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 12:44 PM

14. It's an article from NBC news

How much responsibility were you expecting? Or are you simply more intent on being argumentative rather than substantive with your allegations?

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Response to intaglio (Reply #5)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 11:58 AM

8. You've been trying to put words in my mouth

Seems disingenuous to cry foul now.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #8)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 12:01 PM

10. No the word "Violence" is your OP title

If you did not mean to use that word, edit it.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #10)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 12:07 PM

11. It was quoted directly from the article title

If you didn't understand it, read the article.

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Response to intaglio (Reply #10)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 12:08 PM

12. It's the title of the actual article, verbatim ffs..

 

Look, let's make this simple ... do you agree or disagree with the Center for Disease Control's classification of emotional abuse as a form of domestic violence??

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Response to intaglio (Reply #5)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 05:03 PM

17. I see little debate that men stalking, controlling, and verbally abusing qualifies as violence

 

Do you dispute that those things are abusive and contribute to a cycle of violence?

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Response to lumberjack_jeff (Reply #17)

Wed Aug 7, 2013, 06:57 PM

22. Those behaviors are clearly abusive no matter who engages in them.

And I don't doubt that domestic abuse, in cases where it isn't one-sided, very often is cyclical. Which doesn't change the fact that a woman is statistically far more likely than a man to be put in the hospital, or murdered, by an opposite-sex partner. Some of this is simple biology, i.e. the fact that men on average are larger and stronger, and some is societal factors such as men being more likely to own firearms.

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Response to nomorenomore08 (Reply #22)

Wed Aug 7, 2013, 09:14 PM

23. Absolutely true.

 

Which brings into focus why it is so important to interrupt and treat the cycle of violence and not simply prosecute when that cycle of reciprocal violence escalates into injury to her.

Only 15% of domestic violence is solvable by the methods we use to deal with it.

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Response to lumberjack_jeff (Reply #23)

Thu Aug 8, 2013, 12:02 AM

25. I agree that domestic violence, regardless of the gender of the abuser or abusee, shouldn't

be tolerated. Even supposedly "minor" situations should be nipped in the bud, if at all possible, before they escalate.

I'm not sure about your 15% figure - though I have no particular reason not to believe it - but DV is a notoriously (with good reason) hard to treat problem. Given especially how abuse of all kinds runs in families, and how children from abusive backgrounds are more likely to reproduce both too early and with the wrong person.

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Response to nomorenomore08 (Reply #25)

Thu Aug 8, 2013, 12:42 AM

27. 15% explained.

 

Of the 18,000 young adult relationships studied, the researchers found that 24% had some violence, and 49.7% of those violent relationships were reciprocal. Of the relationships in which nonreciprocal violence was present, the woman was the perpetrator in 70% of those cases.

From there, it's just arithmetic. Only 15% of violent relationships fit the nonreciprocal wife-beater stereotype around which all DV intervention programs are predicated.

They also found that injury was far more likely in reciprocally violent relationships.

The study concluded thusly:
Conclusions. The context of the violence (reciprocal vs nonreciprocal) is a strong predictor of reported injury. Prevention approaches that address the escalation of partner violence may be needed to address reciprocal violence.

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Response to lumberjack_jeff (Reply #27)

Thu Aug 8, 2013, 01:19 AM

28. "...the woman was the perpetrator in 70% of those cases." That in particular is really striking.

Maybe it shows how ingrained the "never hit a girl" taboo (which I would normally consider a good thing) is for many young men.

The thing is though, even if "[o]nly 15% of violent relationships fit the nonreciprocal wife-beater stereotype," those relationships most likely account for a vastly disproportionate number of serious injuries and deaths, for both the reasons I've previously listed - physical size/strength advantage, gun ownership - and others. I'm only speculating on a justification though, because ultimately I agree that our society's and legal system's response to DV thus far has been utterly inadequate on more levels than one. Though admittedly, I have no real solutions to offer there.

And while it's clear that demonizing men as a group, when a minority of their gender commit highly disproportionate levels of violence and abuse, does little to help matters, it's also clear that that segment of the male population - which exists among all races, social classes, etc. - is very dangerous to both women and other men, and must be dealt with as a dire social problem.

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Response to nomorenomore08 (Reply #28)

Thu Aug 8, 2013, 06:01 AM

29. The study said that nonreciprocally violent relationships were less likely to involve injury.

 

...regardless of the gender of the perpetrator.

Reciprocally violent relationships are the ones most likely to result in injury. Death? I dunno. I doubt that a sample size of 18,000 relationships would be enough to identify anything meaningful about homicide.

Personally, I think that the near-complete absence of "men and children" shelters is responsible for a large share of the IPV in this country. The fact that violent women know that he has nowhere to go, and that she has complete and unilateral control of his children is an enabling factor.

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Response to Major Nikon (Original post)

Wed Aug 7, 2013, 06:49 PM

21. Whether or not women are a violent as men - which by many definitions of "violence" they aren't -

I don't think anyone can deny that we have a serious problem with relationship violence, and with violence period, in this country. But just as I believe that all men shouldn't be blamed for the actions of some, I think it's also important to acknowledge the often disparate forms which male and female "violence" take. After all, it's still true that women are killed or seriously injured by male partners far more often than the reverse. Which isn't the whole picture, by any means, but certainly an essential part of it.

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Response to nomorenomore08 (Reply #21)

Wed Aug 7, 2013, 09:37 PM

24. "Violence" need not be in scare quotes.

 

Violence is bad mostly because it triggers escalating retaliatory violence. It is certainly true (and studies show this) that the retaliatory violence is more harmful to women than the stereotype of the unilaterally abusive man.

It would be more effective to interrupt the violence at the source, a point at which no one needs to go to jail.

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Response to lumberjack_jeff (Reply #24)

Thu Aug 8, 2013, 12:08 AM

26. "It would be more effective to interrupt the violence at... a point at which no one needs

to go to jail." Agree completely on that. And I only used the scare quotes because I was kind of splitting hairs between types or levels of violence, which logically I probably shouldn't - firstly, psychological abuse can be just as damaging in its own way as physical abuse, and secondly, physically violent DV situations typically start as arguments and escalate from there.

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Response to Major Nikon (Original post)

Sat Aug 10, 2013, 12:44 AM

30. Not exactly on topic, but close methinks.

 

.
.
.

The only person who has assaulted me in the last 30 years was a woman.

As I was leaving a heated conversation, she kicked me in the ass, then as I continued retreating,

she body-slammed me from behind forcefully enough to knock me face down on the ground.

Her friends dragged her off of me as she tried to beat me further,

and retrieving my glasses which had been knocked off.

Women can be unreasonably violent too.

VERY!

CC

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