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Sun Jul 8, 2012, 08:38 PM

 

Sorry. There is no way someone like THIS should be in front of a classroom

Gotcha.

He's actually a hero that got fired and threatened w. prosecution by NYC school reform bureaucracy for advocating for special needs kids.

I posted this earlier in the day( in GD) under a sympathetic header and and it went down like the Lusitania. I'm curious to see if the general DU public simply prefers to read about teachers who are molestors, abusers and malingerers. The response to this might be edifying.

Truth is... this guy's much more typical of the folks I work with. Except for MUCH BRAVER.



From yesterday's NY Times:

>>For speaking up, Mr. Lirtzman ó who served as a deputy New York State comptroller before turning at age 53 to public-school teaching ó saw his career ground to dust. He was denied tenure, and the principal, Grismaldy Laboy-Wilson, asked him to leave immediately. When he took his worries to the investigative arm of New York Cityís Education Department, the investigators opened a file on him instead.

I wrote of Mr. Lirtzmanís struggle in May. His vindication arrived in the mail in June.

The State Education Department investigated his charges and sent him a copy of its report. It sustained Mr. Lirtzmanís allegations, one violation of state regulations after another.>>>>>

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/07/nyregion/state-backs-up-accusation-by-harris-lirtzman-bronx-teacher-on-special-education-gotham.html?_r=1

8 replies, 3445 views

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Reply Sorry. There is no way someone like THIS should be in front of a classroom (Original post)
Smarmie Doofus Jul 2012 OP
xxqqqzme Jul 2012 #1
Smarmie Doofus Jul 2012 #2
Smarmie Doofus Jul 2012 #3
roguevalley Jul 2012 #4
livvy Jul 2012 #5
proud2BlibKansan Jul 2012 #6
livvy Jul 2012 #8
proud2BlibKansan Jul 2012 #7

Response to Smarmie Doofus (Original post)

Sun Jul 8, 2012, 08:50 PM

1. "...He was denied tenure, and

the principal, Grismaldy Laboy-Wilson, asked him to leave immediately.

The Council of School Supervisors and Administrators, which represents principals, argues that the fault lies with the cityís Education Department,....approved Ms. Laboy-Wilsonís decisions, including placing substitute teachers in special education classrooms on a rotating basis.

The principal, they say, is not at fault.

Well, if she asked him to leave immediately instead of backing him - then Oh, yes, she is.

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Response to xxqqqzme (Reply #1)

Sun Jul 8, 2012, 09:00 PM

2. I know someone who worked in the building.

 

The principal is of a particular variety, that is heavily favored by the corporate NYC ed "reform" bureaucracy these days: 30 yrs old, mba-type, no ( or next to no) teaching experience.

Bloomberg and Co encourage this sort of thing. It's an actual policy. They want principals to be "managers" ... in the corporate mold. Autonomous, data-obsessed, anti-teacher, anti-student, anti-parent.

Autocratic. Answerable only to the next creature up the corporate food chain.

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Response to Smarmie Doofus (Original post)

Sun Jul 8, 2012, 09:24 PM

3. So far this header is kicking my "pro-teacher" header's ass.

 

193 hits in less than an hour. Compared to 137 in about 10 hours.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1002916431


What does it mean, what does it mean , what does it all mean.

I don't think it's a particularly good sign.

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Response to Smarmie Doofus (Original post)

Sun Jul 8, 2012, 11:39 PM

4. you have to be prepared to die if you do this. I know from personal

experience twice.

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Response to Smarmie Doofus (Original post)

Mon Jul 9, 2012, 09:21 AM

5. I taught elementary school for 30 years.

During the last 10 years or so, I had many special ed kids added to my class as part of the least restricted environment part of their IEP's. Each year the kids that were added had more severe disabilities. Although I agree that students should be included as much as possible in a regular classroom environment, I often felt frustrated and totally unprepared for their inclusion. I was not trained to work with these kids. I never took any special ed classes in either my undergrad or masters program, as this was not an area of interest, nor did I expect to have the need. I was on a learn as you go basis, and if not for one special education teacher's very much appreciated assistance, I could have floundered. I never felt it was right to have someone like me, untrained, not certified in special education, and with no prior experience be responsible for the best care for these kids. I made it through each year, and I loved these kids just as much as any (after all, every child has special needs), but I always worried that I was doing them a disservice in some way. There were a couple of years, I felt too, that the non-certified kids got the short end, as so much of my time and energies were spent on the included kids. These were years that I had 3 or more certified kids in the class with pretty high learning disabilities, and one year with a child with some severe behavioral issues.
Before anyone jumps on me, I very strongly believe that all children deserve the best education possible. I also believe that children with special needs do benefit greatly from inclusion with others that aren't certified as special need children, and I think those children benefit from having them in their classrooms as well. I learned a lot working with these kids, tried to do my best, and found their successes rewarding as hell. My only concerns were my qualifications, failing them in my inexperience, and the few times that I felt they interfered with the education of the other children in the class.
The article brought to mind how often special needs kids are done a great disservice, especially when they are placed in classrooms where teachers are overwhelmed, under-trained, and either unmotivated or unable, due to overcrowding, underfunding, etc. to learn how best to help them get the education they need.
In reading the main post, I was struck by how insane it was for penalizing this educator for trying to do the right thing for the kids, and the loss of a great teacher. What a shame.

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Response to livvy (Reply #5)

Mon Jul 9, 2012, 09:54 AM

6. You are so right

They dump more and more sped kids in general ed all the time. Thy claim it's about mainstreaming but I think it's actually about saving money. And it stinks.

My hat's off to this teacher in the OP. He did the right thing.

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Response to proud2BlibKansan (Reply #6)

Mon Jul 9, 2012, 06:58 PM

8. I agree...

It's not fair to the kids, their parents or the teacher. The district I taught in was pretty affluent, and it was a problem at times. I can only imagine how much worse it is in less affluent, or downright desperate for cash districts. Keep that money rolling to the top. Heaven forbid our tax dollars or investments should come back to fund our needs.
Nice to "see" you again!

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Response to Smarmie Doofus (Original post)

Mon Jul 9, 2012, 09:55 AM

7. Here's a blog about him.

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