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Mon Oct 13, 2014, 04:25 PM

The right — and surprisingly wrong — ways to get kids to sit still in class.

In order to create actual changes to the sensory system that results in improved attention over time, children NEED to experience what we call “rapid vestibular (balance) input” on a daily basis. In other words, they need to go upside down, spin in circles, and roll down hills. They need authentic play experiences that get them moving in all different directions in order to stimulate the little hair cells found in the vestibular complex (located in the inner ear). If children do this on a regular basis and for a significant amount of time, then (and only then) will they experience the necessary changes needed to effectively develop the balance system–leading to better attention and learning in the classroom.

In other words, adjusting children’s seating and taking quick one-minute movement breaks will offer some support — but we will continue to see significant sensory and behavioral problems, as well as a decline in children’s overall health (i.e., rise in obesity, decrease strength, and poor body awareness) if we don’t start allowing for adequate time in which children can get up and out of their seats to move.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2014/10/07/the-right-and-surprisingly-wrong-ways-to-get-kids-to-sit-still-in-class/

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Reply The right — and surprisingly wrong — ways to get kids to sit still in class. (Original post)
elleng Oct 2014 OP
SheilaT Oct 2014 #1
femmocrat Oct 2014 #2
yeoman6987 Oct 2014 #5
femmocrat Oct 2014 #6
yeoman6987 Oct 2014 #7
JeniferHuston Oct 2014 #9
Jefferson23 Oct 2014 #3
elleng Oct 2014 #4
Jefferson23 Oct 2014 #8

Response to elleng (Original post)

Mon Oct 13, 2014, 04:33 PM

1. And here I was hoping they were going to

 

say duct tape, or velcro.

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Response to elleng (Original post)

Mon Oct 13, 2014, 04:33 PM

2. K& R Excellent article.

We used to walk to school.... I'm sure that burned up a lot of excess energy, too! Kids don't even walk to the school bus anymore. I see the bus stop at every driveway while the children wait in a car with a parent.

I liked the idea of children needing to spin, roll, etc. Schools no longer have swings or monkey bars because of liabilities. We should just wrap them all in bubble wrap, I guess!

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Response to femmocrat (Reply #2)

Mon Oct 13, 2014, 04:45 PM

5. Safety is an issue for students

 

And parents are brilliant to keep them in cars especially is less desirable areas. Is it worth the risk to have your child hurt in any way? I hope not.

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Response to yeoman6987 (Reply #5)

Mon Oct 13, 2014, 04:52 PM

6. Really? Did you even read the article?

Yes, I advocate pushing kids into traffic.

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Response to femmocrat (Reply #6)

Mon Oct 13, 2014, 04:55 PM

7. I read you reply which is why I commented.

 

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Response to femmocrat (Reply #2)

Tue Oct 14, 2014, 03:44 AM

9. agree

 

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Response to elleng (Original post)

Mon Oct 13, 2014, 04:37 PM

3. This is excellent but sad in the sense that nothing they're stating is actually controversial.

Should be utilized in all schools.

*Shortened recess times, cutting gym classes, and other specials (i.e., music and art) means we are no longer respecting the needs of the whole child. Our system of testing is failing our children. It fails to test their social skills, their ability to think for themselves, and their physical skills (i.e., strength, endurance, coordination). Aren’t these just as important as their ability to read, write, and do arithmetic? We need to be careful not to put total emphasis on just a few subjects, while neglecting children’s other needs.


K&R

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Response to Jefferson23 (Reply #3)

Mon Oct 13, 2014, 04:44 PM

4. IS used in my daughters' school,

and WAS part of their early education, every day! (They now have babies of their own.)

'An important part of our Pre-Primary program involves large motor skill development and sensory processing. Our physical education teachers choose specific activities and equipment to build skills, strength, and endurance. The aim is for students to become competent, comfortable, and adept movers.'

http://www.lowellschool.org/Page/Programs/Pre-Primary-School/Specialist-Activities

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Response to elleng (Reply #4)

Mon Oct 13, 2014, 06:57 PM

8. Yep, accleratiing at going backwords...that's us today, ellen.

Thanks for the link, too. Imagine that:

Highlights of a Week

Science + STEM Education
Creative Arts
Spanish
Dance
Music
Physical Education
Library Time

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