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Sun Mar 18, 2018, 08:35 PM

World's Happiest Country Also Has No Carbon Emissions The small kingdom of Bhutan could be a model



The small kingdom of Bhutan could be a model for countries on the front lines of climate change.



Bhutan is one of the world's remaining biodiversity hotspots. Approximately 72 percent of Bhutan is covered by forests. The country's government has a mandate that 60 percent will be protected for all time. Despite their environmental commitment, Bhutan's glaciers are retreating and melting, causing dangerous floods and resource scarcity.
PHOTOGRAPH BY CIRIL JAZBEC

By Sarah Gibbens
Photographs by Ciril Jazbec
PUBLISHED MARCH 14, 2018


Picture of the mountains of Bhutan
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Bhutan is one of the world's remaining biodiversity hotspots. Approximately 72 percent of Bhutan is covered by forests. The country's government has a mandate that 60 percent will be protected for all time. Despite their environmental commitment, Bhutan's glaciers are retreating and melting, causing dangerous floods and resource scarcity.
PHOTOGRAPH BY CIRIL JAZBEC
By Sarah Gibbens
Photographs by Ciril Jazbec
PUBLISHED MARCH 14, 2018

National Geographic produced this content as part of our partnership with Rolex, formed to promote exploration and conservation. The organizations will join forces in efforts that support veteran explorers, nurture emerging explorers, and protect Earth’s wonders.
Bhutan is small, about the size of Switzerland, and similarly mountainous—though more geographically remote. To the south, Bhutan is landlocked by India, and to the North, it's buffered by the mighty Himalaya. Before 1974, Bhutan was completely closed off to tourists and most outsiders, and even now, only a few fee-paying visitors are allowed in at a time.

The small mountain kingdom is home to a thriving, ancient culture, as well as stunning natural beauty. What many believe is the world's highest unclimbed peak, Gangkhar Puensum, soars nearly 25,000 feet into the clouds. Without a sizeable wallet, or an outsized sense of adventure, few people will actually get to visit this unique kingdom.

Slovenian photographer Ciril Jazbec is one of the lucky few who have visited Bhutan. He recently toured the country, visiting small villages, exploring vast forests, and meeting local people. His resulting work is an intimate look at the small nation that few foreigners ever see.

His photos range from traditional pastoral scenes to what may surprise outsiders as modern lifestyles. But because it's Bhutan, striking glacial mountains flanked by deep, green forests are often in the background. The overall impression is one of a special place that hangs in the balance. It's a blend of history and change, old and new, impact and resilience.

More:
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2018/march/bhutan-gross-domestic-happiness-sustainability-environment-mountains/

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