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Wed Dec 12, 2018, 06:10 AM

Washington state combats collisions with new wildlife bridge

December 12, 2018 by Manuel Valdes



In this photo taken Oct. 4, 2018, eastbound Interstate 90 traffic passes beneath a
wildlife bridge under construction on Snoqualmie Pass, Wash. The stretch of highway
crossing the Cascade Mountains cuts through old growth forest and wetlands,
creating a dangerous border for wildlife everything from an elk down to a small
salamander. The new crossing gives animals in these mountains a safer option for
crossing the road: They'll be able to go above it. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)


Before descending the Cascade Mountains on its final stretch to Seattle, Interstate 90 cuts through a mountain pass of old growth forests and wetlands.

For countless wildlife species, the busy highway is a border, constraining their movements and posing a fatal risk should they dare to cross it.

"Everything from an elk down to a small salamander, they need to move to find food, to find mates, to find new places to live as their populations expand or just when conditions change, like a fire breaks out," said Jen Watkins of Conservation Northwest.

Soon, animals will have a safer option for crossing the road: They'll be able to go above it.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-12-washington-state-combats-collisions-wildlife.html#jCp

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Reply Washington state combats collisions with new wildlife bridge (Original post)
Judi Lynn Dec 2018 OP
TreasonousBastard Dec 2018 #1

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Dec 12, 2018, 06:49 AM

1. Maybe 20 or so years ago New Jersey did this after I-78 split the Watchung Reservation...

and cut off an ancient wildlife path. It did reduce deer and coyote deaths and crumpled grills on the highway.

You can see it on Google maps if you search for Watchung Stables in Summit and scroll a little to the northwest.

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