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Tue Aug 20, 2019, 09:39 AM

Death, blackouts, melting asphalt: ways the climate crisis will change how we live

The Guardian
August 20,2019
By Pam Radtke Russell
From power cuts to infrastructure failure, the impact of climate change on US cities will be huge – but many are already innovating to adapt

Between record heat and rain, this summer’s weather patterns have indicated, once again, that the climate is changing. US cities, where more than 80% of the nation’s population lives, are disproportionately hit by these changes, not only because of their huge populations but because of their existing – often inadequate – infrastructure.

“People are coming into urban areas and they cannot be stopped,” says Chandana Mitra, an associate professor of geosciences at Auburn University, who studies the impact of heat on cities...
While the impacts of climate change are fundamentally local, experts say heat is one of the most concerning, especially in cities. “From a disaster perspective, [heat] is invisible,” says Kurt Shickman, executive director of the Global Cool Cities Alliance. Mitra likens the problem to having a finger in a pan of water while someone gradually turns up the heat. “Maybe in 50 or 60 years, living in some cities will be unbearable. There could be a tipping point of no return.”

A study by the University of Maryland published this year predicts that by 2080... if emissions continue at the current pace residents in cities around the nation will:

• Experience an average temperature increase of 8.2F (4.5C)

• Live in climates similar to the current climates of cities 528 miles (850kms) south of their hometowns


More here on how cities are trying to cope with climate change
https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/aug/20/death-blackouts-melting-asphalt-ways-the-climate-crisis-will-change-how-we-live?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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Reply Death, blackouts, melting asphalt: ways the climate crisis will change how we live (Original post)
bronxiteforever Aug 2019 OP
Mike 03 Aug 2019 #1
bronxiteforever Aug 2019 #2
Duppers Aug 2019 #3
progree Aug 2019 #4

Response to bronxiteforever (Original post)

Tue Aug 20, 2019, 09:47 AM

1. Good article. "Power outages"

Just imagine the deadly combination of extreme temperatures and power outages. From the article:

Power outages. As experienced by New Yorkers this year, excessive heat in conjunction with excess demand for electricity for air conditioning can cause the grid – or portions of it – to fail. “Energy demand is going to go up,” says Shickman. “It’s a substantial and nonlinear reaction. Our grid is going to be taxed in ways I don’t think we are prepared for.” Shickman says that going from an 80F day to a 90F day would require an additional 20-25% power. Going to 95F requires almost 40% more power. Excess heat can also evaporate water needed to cool power plants, forcing some out of commission.

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Response to Mike 03 (Reply #1)

Tue Aug 20, 2019, 09:53 AM

2. +1 Good quote. I did not realize the amount of power

It takes going from 80f to 90f. That is really incredible.

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Response to Mike 03 (Reply #1)

Tue Aug 20, 2019, 01:58 PM

3. Any substantial plans to upgrade the power grid?

NYC is a hell-of-a-place to lose.

Or should I advise my son who's now living in Brooklyn to move? He's a fairly new resident, working in Manhattan and dearly loving the city.

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Response to Mike 03 (Reply #1)

Tue Aug 20, 2019, 11:36 PM

4. And thermal power plants (pretty much all fossil fuel plants) are less efficient the higher

the ambient temperature is. So even if they aren't forced off-line by excess cooling water temperature, they will be less efficient (i.e. requiring burning more fuel per net KWH of electricity produced).

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