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Fri Sep 4, 2015, 12:42 PM

DIY Electric clothes dryer energy recovery for those colder months

http://georgesworkshop.blogspot.ca/2014/06/clothes-dryer-heat-recovery.html

This easily built project recovers warm moist air from a clothes dryer that would otherwise be exhausted to the sub-zero outside.

Energy is saved two ways: heat used to dry clothes remains in the house and less cold air is drawn in by preventing negative pressure. Electrical energy that is used to dry clothes contributes to house warming. Moisture that is added to the house air is welcome during a northern winter when the cold temperature outside causes the air in the house to become very dry.

I only use this in winter. In the summer, I re-route the vent to the outside but I use the clothes dryer only on rainy days. I use the outdoor clothes line whenever possible. I also have a indoor clothes line which is used on damp days and even in the winter.

My clothes dryer is used as little as possible as it uses an enormous amount of electrical energy. The nameplate on mine lists 25 amps at 240 volts or (25x240=) 6000 watts. When I do use it, it is good to know that the expensive heat is used twice by not being blown outside.

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Reply DIY Electric clothes dryer energy recovery for those colder months (Original post)
Fumesucker Sep 2015 OP
Curmudgeoness Sep 2015 #1
MADem Sep 2015 #2
progressoid Oct 2015 #3
MADem Oct 2015 #4
Sherman A1 Nov 2015 #5

Response to Fumesucker (Original post)

Fri Sep 4, 2015, 03:58 PM

1. This is a really good idea.

I have always hated seeing all the heat go outside in the winter.

Too bad that I have a gas dryer! But that's ok, I didn't really understand his instructions...I might have tried harder if I could have used this. But if you can vent to the inside, this is a great way to save heat.

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Response to Fumesucker (Original post)

Fri Sep 4, 2015, 04:02 PM

2. If you aren't handy, you can find those plastic diverter boxes pretty cheap.

I have one at a vacation place--it cost maybe six bucks. It has a flap that you open/close, and there's a little "screen door" that catches the lint when the flap is opened to let heat in the house.

I have a neighbor who does the same thing even cheaper, with a leg of nylon hose and and a sturdy rubber band--the nylon collects any stray lint and the rubber band keeps it fastened over the vent hose.


It should be reiterated that this is only good for ELECTRIC dryers--I have a gas one in my regular joint and I just say goodbye to that hot air because it wouldn't be safe.

It is nice to "humidfy" dry winter air, and save a bit of energy too.

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Response to MADem (Reply #2)

Wed Oct 21, 2015, 04:29 PM

3. We do the nylon thing.

But it doesn't catch all the lint. In the spring we usually have to dust the laundry room more often.

It does a nice job of humidifying that side of the house though.

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Response to progressoid (Reply #3)

Wed Oct 21, 2015, 05:53 PM

4. Try using a "gentleman's sock!" The knit is a bit thicker--and put a tight rubber band round the

end!

I use the little box from the hardware store with a couple of screens and a little door to clean it out.

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Response to Fumesucker (Original post)

Tue Nov 24, 2015, 10:25 AM

5. Cool

Thanks for posting.

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