HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Health » Health (Group) » Popular Drugs Linked To D...

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 10:34 AM

Popular Drugs Linked To Dementia Even At Low Dosage

A new study out of the University of Washington provides the strong evidence that certain popular drugs may increase the risk for dementia in older adults. The drugs share some common mechanisms within key areas of the brain, but are used primarily as ingredients in over-the-counter sleep, cough and cold, and allergy medicines as well as in the treatment of an overactive bladder and depression.
Drugs and Dementia

The most commonly used drug linked to dementia was diphenhydramine, which is used in many popular products such as Benadryl, Nytol Sominex, Theraflu, Triaminic Allergy, plus many others. Also implicated where drugs containing chlorpheniramine (Aller-Chlor); oxybutynin (Ditropan) and tolterodine (Detrol) for overactive bladder; and the tricyclic antidepressants, such as doxepin or amitriptyline.
Background Data

Acetylcholine is a critical brain chemical involved in the transmission of the nerve impulse and is especially important for proper memory and cognitive function. For example, Alzheimer’s disease is associated with a severe reduction in acetylcholine levels due to reduced activity of the enzyme that manufactures acetylcholine (choline acetyltransferase).

Given the link between low acetylcholine levels and poor brain function, including dementia, previous studies have linked drugs to reduced acetylcholine activity as well as mild cognitive impairment. These drugs include the ones mentioned in the introduction above. While discontinuation of the drugs is thought to reverse the mental deficit, there is evidence that anticholinergic drugs may produce permanent changes leading to irreversible dementia. These drugs are known to cause short-term drowsiness or confusion, which is included in the prescribing information, but the long-term effects these drugs have on mental function are generally not known by physicians or the people taking them.

http://www.curejoy.com/content/popular-drugs-linked-dementia-even-low-dosage/

30 replies, 5364 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 30 replies Author Time Post
Reply Popular Drugs Linked To Dementia Even At Low Dosage (Original post)
azurnoir Jun 2015 OP
Sherman A1 Jun 2015 #1
tridim Jun 2015 #2
progressoid Jun 2015 #4
tridim Jun 2015 #8
progressoid Jun 2015 #16
tridim Jun 2015 #19
progressoid Jun 2015 #3
greyl Jun 2015 #7
progressoid Jun 2015 #17
OKIsItJustMe Jun 2015 #25
Omaha Steve Jun 2015 #5
progressoid Jun 2015 #18
Android3.14 Jun 2015 #6
Bluenorthwest Jun 2015 #9
Android3.14 Jun 2015 #13
nolabels Jun 2015 #11
Duppers Jun 2015 #28
Android3.14 Jun 2015 #29
Duppers Jun 2015 #30
Dont call me Shirley Jun 2015 #10
tridim Jun 2015 #20
Dont call me Shirley Jun 2015 #22
Not a Fan Jun 2015 #12
tridim Jun 2015 #23
logosoco Jun 2015 #14
Spitfire of ATJ Jun 2015 #15
tridim Jun 2015 #21
Spitfire of ATJ Jun 2015 #26
OKIsItJustMe Jun 2015 #24
pansypoo53219 Jun 2015 #27

Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 10:42 AM

1. Thanks for Posting!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 11:18 AM

2. Stopping all pharmaceticals was one of the best health decisions I ever made.

Fortunately I stopped long before these new studies started proving my hunch correct.

There is no need to ever ingest poison to mask a symptom related to a bigger issue.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tridim (Reply #2)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 12:23 PM

4. Yes, there is a need to ingest "poison".

Many symptoms can only be masked when there is no cure for the "bigger issue".

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to progressoid (Reply #4)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:04 PM

8. Getting decapitated is a big issue with no cure...

Then there are "bigger issues" like type II diabetes that do indeed have non-drug cures.

The cure, ironically is to simply STOP EATING POISON as suggested by the Standard American Diet food pyramid. Dangerous drugs don't even have to enter the picture.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tridim (Reply #8)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:34 PM

16. I have a neurological disorder for which "stop eating poison" is meaningless.

It's genetic.

Speaking of irony. My college friend thought he could manage his bi-polar disease without those prescription "poisons". So after 12 years of successfully using medication, he decided to try the "natural" method. A few months later, he put a bullet in his brain. Oh wait, that's not irony, that's just fucking sad.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to progressoid (Reply #16)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 03:56 PM

19. Is your disorder genetic or epigenetic?

What "nautral method" did your friend try? Did his doctor taper him off of his drugs as they are supposed to?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 12:18 PM

3. Correlation does not imply causation

Where's a link to the actual study?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to progressoid (Reply #3)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 12:59 PM

7. Right, plenty of links to Dr. Murray, but none to the study. I think the story is months old.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to greyl (Reply #7)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:40 PM

17. Thanks, that's better.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to progressoid (Reply #3)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 05:17 PM

25. Here’s the study…

https://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2091745
[font face=Serif]Original Investigation | March 2015

[font size=5]Cumulative Use of Strong Anticholinergics and Incident Dementia[/font]

[font size=4]A Prospective Cohort Study[/font]

[font size=3]…

Results The most common anticholinergic classes used were tricyclic antidepressants, first-generation antihistamines, and bladder antimuscarinics. During a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, 797 participants (23.2%) developed dementia (637 of these [79.9%] developed Alzheimer disease). A 10-year cumulative dose-response relationship was observed for dementia and Alzheimer disease (test for trend, P < .001). For dementia, adjusted hazard ratios for cumulative anticholinergic use compared with nonuse were 0.92 (95% CI, 0.74-1.16) for TSDDs of 1 to 90; 1.19 (95% CI, 0.94-1.51) for TSDDs of 91 to 365; 1.23 (95% CI, 0.94-1.62) for TSDDs of 366 to 1095; and 1.54 (95% CI, 1.21-1.96) for TSDDs greater than 1095. A similar pattern of results was noted for Alzheimer disease. Results were robust in secondary, sensitivity, and post hoc analyses.

Conclusions and Relevance Higher cumulative anticholinergic use is associated with an increased risk for dementia. Efforts to increase awareness among health care professionals and older adults about this potential medication-related risk are important to minimize anticholinergic use over time.

…[/font][/font]

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 12:53 PM

5. I've been taking amitriptyline for 20+ years for headache relief


I have FTD (dementia).

Thanks for posting.

OS

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink



Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 12:57 PM

6. Not taking this seriously

 

I'm sure curejoy.com is run by lovely people, but I would be suspicious of anything from this site.

The article is undated. The author withheld a link to the paper from which he says he pulled his information. The link to the author's website doesn't work. He also does not list specific dosages or describe what heavy use is or light use or even how the researchers defined dementia.

The bio on "Doctor" Murray is as follows
Michael T. Murray
Michael T. Murray ND is a naturopathic physician regarded as one of the world's top authorities on natural medicine. An educator, lecturer, researcher, and health food industry consultant, he is the author of more than 30 books, including his new book, The Complete Book of Juicing, Revised and Updated: Your Delicious Guide to Youthful Vitality (Clarkson Potter, 2014). Learn more at www.DrMurray.com.


I think we can, at this point, safely ignore this.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Android3.14 (Reply #6)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:04 PM

9. Here it is from the BBC and Harvard U

 

Dementia 'linked' to common over-the-counter drugs
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30988643

Common anticholinergic drugs like Benadryl linked to increased dementia risk
http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/common-anticholinergic-drugs-like-benadryl-linked-increased-dementia-risk-201501287667

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #9)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:23 PM

13. I take that much more seriously than the OP's article

 

From the BBC article
"The researchers only looked at older people and found the increased risk appeared when people took drugs every day for three years or more"

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Android3.14 (Reply #6)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:13 PM

11. I don't take too much of anything seriously

That would be especially true with prescription drugs. Other than for acute or life threatening illness they mostly don't do anything good for you.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Android3.14 (Reply #6)

Thu Jun 18, 2015, 02:17 AM

28. okay, how about the U of Washington link

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Duppers (Reply #28)

Thu Jun 18, 2015, 04:48 AM

29. Thanks.

 

The article in the OP shows serious bias and withholds important information.

Compare "Popular Drugs Linked To Dementia Even At Low Dosage" of the OP to the WU article, which links to the actual paper the researchers wrote - "The large study links a significantly increased risk for developing dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, to taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects at higher doses or for a longer time."

Compare that to the OP headline.

Thanks for the link.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Android3.14 (Reply #29)

Thu Jun 18, 2015, 05:11 AM

30. You're welcome.

I had a problem with the site too, that's why I googled the title to find the study.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:09 PM

10. The drug companies hide vital information from consumers bout the side effects of their products

and lie routinely to the public about their product's safety, as a consistent corporate policy.

I have real success healing my body with herbs and food, rather than with any pharmaceutical drug.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Dont call me Shirley (Reply #10)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 03:58 PM

20. I'm having great success as well, and I get attacked for it constantly.

Because it's not "official" or "government approved" or whatever. It's just healthy.

I haven't taken a pharmaceutical drug in 25 years. Don't need em.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tridim (Reply #20)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 04:04 PM

22. We get ridiculed here on a liberal venue. Wholistic healing was the liberal leftist hippie's domain.

Wholistic medicine is a part of the universal healthcare systems in many countries. Why is it heckled and degraded here? A: The For-Profit-Disease-Treatment-System!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:14 PM

12. Dementia

Maybe they block Vitamin D synthesis.

[link:https://www.aan.com/PressRoom/Home/PressRelease/1300|
Study: Link Between Vitamin D and Dementia Risk Confirmed]

From the American Academy of Neurology

“We expected to find an association between low Vitamin D levels and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, but the results were surprising—we actually found that the association was twice as strong as we anticipated,” said study author David J. Llewellyn, PhD, of the University of Exeter Medical School in the United Kingdom.

(snip)

People with lower levels of vitamin D were nearly 70 percent more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and those who had severe deficiency were over 120 percent more likely to develop the disease.

The results remained the same after researchers adjusted for other factors that could affect risk of dementia, such as education, smoking and alcohol consumption.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Not a Fan (Reply #12)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 04:06 PM

23. IMO that is the result of low/no-fat diets and/or statins.

Both of which will result in a lack of cholesterol production which your body absolutely requires to make vitamin D from the Sun.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:26 PM

14. Thanks for posting this.

I know my story is anecdotal, but my 88 year old aunt recently became very very mentally confused (she was pretty out there to start with, but it was very noticeable). My mom went out to check on her and did not give her any of her meds, because she did not know if she had taken any, and she said the result was amazing.
I know some things in life are a trade off and we take risks all the time, but it seems like my aunt's doctor was not even paying attention to her needs, just putting things on a prescription pad. He gave her one for an over active bladder and she never even said anything about that being a problem~ I was going to the bathroom more than she was~

Getting old and having dementia is hard enough without medications making it more complicated.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 01:33 PM

15. I know someone who takes Benadryl for itching....

 

I'm going to recommend something topical like Solarcaine.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #15)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 04:02 PM

21. Or scratching.

Is your friend dehydrated? That's where I'd start.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tridim (Reply #21)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 06:07 PM

26. It's Vegas. I think EVERYONE is.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 05:04 PM

24. (!) Media dementia scare over hay fever and sleep drugs (!)

http://www.nhs.uk/news/2015/01January/Pages/media-dementia-scare-about-common-drugs.aspx
[font face=Serif][font size=5]Media dementia scare over hay fever and sleep drugs[/font]

Tuesday January 27 2015

[font size=3]"Hay fever tablets raise risk of Alzheimer's," is the main front page news in the Daily Mirror. The Guardian mentions popular brand names such as Nytol, Benadryl, Ditropan and Piriton among the pills studied.

But before you clear out your bathroom medicine cabinet, you might want to consider the facts behind the (somewhat misleading) headlines.

The first thing to realise is although some of these drugs can be bought over the counter (OTC), in the US, OTC drugs are typically provided by a private health company. So the study was able to partially track the effects of OTC as well as prescription medication (which would be impossible in the UK).



That said, this large, well-designed US study suggested those taking the highest levels of anticholinergic prescribed medicines were at a higher risk of developing dementia compared with those not taking any.

…[/font][/font]


http://sop.washington.edu/higher-dementia-risk-linked-use-common-drugs/
[font face=Serif][font size=5]Higher dementia risk linked to more use of common drugs[/font]

[font size=3]Dr. Shelly Gray et. al. found a persistent link between dementia and some medications in a University of Washington/Group Health study published in JAMA Internal Medicine on January 26, 2015. The large study links a significantly increased risk for developing dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, to taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects at higher doses or for a longer time. Many older people take these medications, which include nonprescription diphenhydramine (Benadryl). JAMA Internal Medicine published the report, called “Cumulative Use of Strong Anticholinergic Medications and Incident Dementia.”

The study used more rigorous methods, longer follow-up (more than seven years), and better assessment of medication use via pharmacy records (including substantial nonprescription use) to confirm this previously reported link. It is the first study to show a dose response: linking more risk for developing dementia to higher use of anticholinergic medications. And it is also the first to suggest that dementia risk linked to anticholinergic medications may persist—and may not be reversible even years after people stop taking these drugs.

“Older adults should be aware that many medications—including some available without a prescription, such as over-the-counter sleep aids—have strong anticholinergic effects,” said Shelly Gray, PharmD, MS, the first author of the report, which tracks nearly 3,500 Group Health seniors participating in the long-running Adult Changes in Thought (ACT), a joint Group Health–University of Washington (UW) study funded by the National Institute on Aging. “And they should tell their health care providers about all their over-the-counter use,” she added.

“But of course, no one should stop taking any therapy without consulting their health care provider,” said Dr. Gray, who is a professor, the vice chair of curriculum and instruction, and director of the geriatric pharmacy program at the UW School of Pharmacy. “Health care providers should regularly review their older patients’ drug regimens—including over-the-counter medications—to look for chances to use fewer anticholinergic medications at lower doses.”

…[/font][/font]



http://blog.aarp.org/2015/01/29/common-sleep-and-allergy-medications-linked-to-dementia-alzheimers/
[font face=Serif]Posted on 01/29/2015
[font size=5]Common Sleep and Allergy Medications Linked to Dementia, Alzheimer’s[/font]

[font size=3]…

“We know that these medications may have an effect on memory, and we always assumed that these effects were reversible. We didn’t think these medications were changing the brain permanently. Our study does suggest a link between the highest use and increased dementia risk,” said Gray.

The researchers tracked 3,500 older adults for use of medications with an anticholinergic blocking effect on the nervous system. (The People’s Pharmacy has a list of generic and brand-name anticholinergic medicines, including common side-effects.)

Medications that act on the brain this way are known to cause short-term problems with cognition and thinking — consider the pervasive “no driving or operating heavy machinery” warnings on the labels — but researchers with the University of Washington and Seattle’s Group Health Research Institute set out to see whether they have a long-term effect as well. They followed subjects for seven years, and used pharmacy records to track both prescription and over-the-counter medication use. The study was published Jan. 26 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Because trouble sleeping is a common long-term dilemma for older adults, Gray recommended that they “think twice” before choosing over-the-counter sleeping pills and instead first try nondrug therapy for insomnia – such as avoiding sleep at least six hours before bedtime and waking up at the same time every day, even on weekends.

…[/font][/font]

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to azurnoir (Original post)

Wed Jun 17, 2015, 07:41 PM

27. jeez, i am glad i switched to local honey for hay fever!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread