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Sat Sep 25, 2021, 11:39 AM

Noted Anti-Vax Doctor Claimed COVID Vaccine Could Make People Magnetic, Has License Renewed Ohio

- Yahoo/Business Insider, Sept. 25, 2021.

A prominent anti-vax doctor from Ohio, who pushed the false claim that COVID-19 vaccines could make people magnetic, has had her medical license renewed, according to the Ohio Capital Journal. Dr. Sherri Tenpenny is an osteopathic physician who has spent years making unproven or exaggerated claims about vaccines.

Her license, first issued in 1984, was due to expire on October 1. It was renewed by the State Medical Board of Ohio on September 16.

Jerica Stewart, a spokesperson for the Board, confirmed to the Ohio Capital Journal that Tenpenny's license was automatically renewed until 2023. "A recent renewal does not prevent the board from taking future disciplinary action," she said, according to the Ohio Capital Journal.

Tenpenny attracted nationwide media attention in June after she falsely told Ohio House Health Committee that the coronavirus vaccine could potentially make people "magnetized," Insider reported previously. "You can put a key on their forehead. It sticks. You can put spoons and forks all over, and they can stick because now we think there is a metal piece to that," she said. Tenpenny also falsely said that COVID-19 vaccines contain particles that connect a person to 5G mobile data networks.

The Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) named Tenpenny among 12 anti-vaxxers responsible for spreading 65% of false information about vaccines in March this year...

- More,
https://news.yahoo.com/prominent-anti-vax-doctor-falsely-100600620.html




- Sherri Tenpenny, osteopathic physician.

Sherri J. Tenpenny is an American anti-vaccination activist who supports the disproven hypothesis that vaccines cause autism. An osteopathic physician, she is the author of four books opposing vaccination. A 2015 lecture tour of Australia was canceled due to a public outcry over her views on vaccination, which oppose established scientific consensus. A 2021 Center for Countering Digital Hate analysis concluded that Tenpenny is among the top twelve people spreading COVID-19 misinformation and pseudoscientific anti-vaccine misinformation on social media platforms. She has falsely asserted the vaccines magnetize people and connect them with cellphone towers... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherri_Tenpenny

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 11:41 AM

1. I'm assuming license renewal is simply a matter of sending in some paperwork

and maybe a renewal fee, an administrative process separate from professional discipline.

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Response to Ocelot II (Reply #1)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 05:42 PM

12. Yes. Reporters don't even bother to research what they are reporting on it seems.

Renewal is automatic with the completion of online (many states) or mailed paperwork and payment of licensure fees--unless a Board has taken action against them. In this case, there is no clear indication a complaint is pending.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 11:51 AM

2. Tenpenny may be an osteopathic physician, but she's not a physicist.

Sounds like she knows NOTHING about physics. Does she have any idea how much iron or magnetized metal someone would have to consume to create a magnetic field strong enough to attract whole pieces of dinnerware? People with backyard knowledge of physics know that this is a laughable assertion. Does she also think that Jupiter's or even Uranus' magnetic fields are strong enough to influence the behavior of humans on earth?

Humans are capable of believing in anything. Our history makes that clear. But rational thought and science exist on a separate plain. Beliefs are a cousin to fantasy, and Tenpenny is more a fantasist than a doctor.

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Response to Eyeball_Kid (Reply #2)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 11:57 AM

3. " Also fmr director of a hospital emerg. dept. Her hustle

is mainly focused on peddling anti-vax speaking tours and videos, per wiki.

(Wiki). Tenpenny graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toledo in 1980 and received a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree from the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Missouri in 1984.[5]

From 1986 to 1998, Tenpenny was the director of the emergency department at Blanchard Valley Hospital in Findlay, Ohio. She opened an osteopathic practice in 1994 and went on to establish two more practices in 1996 and 2011.[6]

Anti-vaccination activism: Tenpenny had scheduled a speaking tour in Australia to occur starting in February 2015, but in January, after objections were raised to her anti-vaccination views, all the venues at which she was scheduled to speak cancelled the talks, and the tour was called off.[7][8] Tenpenny has been criticized by the Stop The Australian Anti-Vaccination Network for "endangering people's health" and "targeting vulnerable parents".[6]

Since 2017, Tenpenny and her business partner, Matthew Hunt, have taught a six-week, $623 course titled "Mastering Vaccine Info Boot Camp" designed to "sow seeds of doubt" regarding public health information. During the course, Tenpenny explains her views on the immune system and vaccines, and Hunt instructs participants on how best to use persuasion tactics in conversation to communicate the information.[9]

Tenpenny promotes anti-vaccination videos sold by Ty and Charlene Bollinger and receives a commission whenever her referrals result in a sale,[10] a practice known as affiliate marketing.[11]...

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 12:37 PM

4. An "osteopathic physician" is not a real doctor.

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Response to PSPS (Reply #4)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 01:33 PM

5. Yes, they are.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/expert-answers/osteopathic-medicine/faq-20058168

That doesn't mean that they are all competent, just as not all M.D.s are competent. Exhibit A: Dr. Ronny Jackson, M.D., who told us Trump was the picture of vibrant health.

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Response to Ocelot II (Reply #5)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 02:21 PM

7. Their patients like to think of them as such, but they're not

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Response to PSPS (Reply #7)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 02:52 PM

8. They take the same courses and have to pass the same medical board exams

as M.D.s. You might be thinking of naturopaths, who aren't real doctors.

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Response to PSPS (Reply #7)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 05:45 PM

13. AMA considers them to be.

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 02:06 PM

6. Anti-vaccine nurse tries to prove she is now magnetic - FAIL

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Response to keithbvadu2 (Reply #6)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 05:32 PM

10. FAIL, but look at her stubborn confidence, wow

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Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 04:55 PM

9. This idiot should not be allowed to practice medicine

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Response to LetMyPeopleVote (Reply #9)

Sat Sep 25, 2021, 05:35 PM

11. 'Sociopathic doctor' grifter-fraud is more accurate

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