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Mon Jul 30, 2018, 04:49 AM

I started naltrexone again for booze Saturday

I took it years ago and did not drink for almost two years 07-09. Now at 52 I asked doc for another prescription. I have come to understand that Iím a functioning alcoholic is the term that they use. When I drink I drink to get drunk never violent always mellow. Saturday I had a few on back porch but I do remember after like a week on naltrexone the craving goes away. And your thoughts change from wanting a beer to just not having any. It was my call to do it my wife saw the prescription on counter and asked.

I do think alcoholism is hereditary I come from a family of drinkers. You work hard you play hard after they put in week at steel mill. And it seemed normal after a week of linehaul or yard jockey time to crack a few. Or like in infantry ok weíre done with that field exercise time to get drunk and try not to end up on the military police report . I suffer from ok I worked hard time for a reward it just took me to decide to ask the doc for this.

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Reply I started naltrexone again for booze Saturday (Original post)
TEB Jul 2018 OP
Volaris Jul 2018 #1
MLAA Jul 2018 #2
MFM008 Jul 2018 #3
Rhiannon12866 Jul 2018 #4
Victor_c3 Jul 2018 #5
TEB Jul 2018 #7
TexasProgresive Jul 2018 #11
CaptainTruth Jul 2018 #6
Tucker08087 Jul 2018 #8
HopeAgain Jul 2018 #9
democrank Jul 2018 #10
TexasProgresive Jul 2018 #12
CentralMass Jul 2018 #13
SouthernIrish Jul 2018 #14
Bernardo de La Paz Jul 2018 #15
dawg day Jul 2018 #16
Ohiogal Jul 2018 #17

Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 05:36 AM

1. Good for you.

My father was an extremely high-functioning alcoholic for all of his adult life (like he'd work 80 or 90 hours a week, for years at a time).

I think he recognized it was a problem?, but he never quite could find his way out of it long term. I know he was clinically manic, and I suspect the booze was a kind of painkiller for something he couldn't shake or allow himself to grieve properly for.

Stark choices. You made a good one, and godspeed. I don't even know you, but I'm proud of you!

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 05:42 AM

2. I am cheering for you! And the Boog, that wonderful Lab of yours is by your side.

Well done, TEB.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 05:47 AM

3. Best of luck

My son is on his 3rd week of sobriety.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 05:52 AM

4. I'm proud of you, too. You recognized you had a problem and addressed it.

I've been in AA since 2008 and so many people I meet were forced into treatment for legal reasons. And I agree that it's genetic, seems like the majority of people I've gotten to know say they come from alcoholic families. And the way one woman described it stuck with me. She said "I realized early on that I didn't have an 'off switch.'" That's what it was like for me. Good luck and remember that living sober isn't a destination, it's a journey. That's another quote that resonated with me...

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 05:53 AM

5. I'm on naltrexone as well

Iíve been debating switching to vivatrol (itís basically the same thing, but itís an injection you get once per month), but I get sloppy with taking my meds at times.

When I take naltrexone and some of my other PTSD meds, I find that it kills my appetite and I sweat a lot when I exercise. I just make sure I drink lots of water, but after a few months of it Iím finally getting my beach-body back.

The weight loss is a just a good side affect for me. It could also be that, when Iím not drinking alcohol, that I consume way less calories too.

At 38 years old, Iím going to finally be able to sport my speedo at the beach. Now that Iím divorced and single, I just need someone to help shave my back. When I get my bro-zilian (the male version of a Brazilian) maybe Iíll just get them to wax my back too.

Just kidding, I donít have a hairy back.

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Response to Victor_c3 (Reply #5)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 06:06 AM

7. I hear you

Iím 6 ft 145 I like to run and hit gym for circuit pt. Thanks LT

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Response to Victor_c3 (Reply #5)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 07:14 AM

11. Thanks for the laugh. I never had a "beach" body even when fit

I'm sure if you had a hairy back some dominatrix would gladly do the wax job. Stay healthy and sober. And congrates on getting a Bronze Star and surviving to tell the tail. There is one in my Dad's (rip) display case from WW II. I asked him what he got it for and he couldn't or wouldn't tell.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 05:58 AM

6. I'm here in spirit, supporting you!

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 06:20 AM

8. Good for you!

When asked why I made a certain life-changing decision when I did, my simple response was, ďI just decided that it was time.Ē So maybe it was your time.
I drink. Probably more than I should. I like wine and I donít like stress, but I also donít like the added pounds. Iím not sure if Iíd need medical help if I decide to stop, but I had no idea it existed, and hopefully Iím not the only back-woods person who was unaware. So thanks for sharing your story. It may help others, and itís good to hear that you are focusing on you and your health.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 06:54 AM

9. You can do it

9+ years sober here. I didn't take anything for the cravings and found, as another "functional alcoholic" that they went away after a few very uncomfortable weeks. I did need a sufficient substitute for Alcohol, especially to deal with anxiety and stress. Active participation in AA turned out to be the thing for me.

I am the happiest I have ever been and now I don't miss a drink at all.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 07:12 AM

10. I'm pulling for you, TEB.

You can do this.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 07:20 AM

12. That's good. I didn't know about naltrexone.

I can't offer any real advice as my drug of choice is nicotine delivered by a non-filtered paper tube filled with full flavor tobacco. I don't smoke any more but it is still there. If I have a beer with people who smoke there is a real danger that I would bum a cigarette off of them and I would be back in the smoke ring.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 07:21 AM

13. Good luck.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 07:43 AM

14. Good for you

I am wishing you all the best in this. You know the effects that alcohol has on your mind and body. You need to be around for a long time for your wife and kiddos. From your writing, I can tell that you are a kind and compassionate man. The world needs more people like you. Because of your service and your activism with veterans and always looking out for the underdog, you are a very valued member of society. Prayers for you and wishing you a long and happy life.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 07:56 AM

15. You can do it, with help. Get support where you can find it and lean on it at least a little. . . nt

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 08:54 AM

16. The Atlantic has an article about this "Sinclair Method"

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/04/the-irrationality-of-alcoholics-anonymous/386255/


The first part is a lot of dissing AA, so skip through that. Later it talks about naltrexone being used in Scandinavia as a first-line treatment, that it stops the craving (helps with carbs and opioids too, apparently!).
I hope more people learn about this, at least enough to give it a try.

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Response to TEB (Original post)

Mon Jul 30, 2018, 09:32 AM

17. Good for you TEB

Recognizing you have an addiction problem is the most important step, no?

My father was a functional alcoholic. My mom hated that he drank so much after he got home from work. And I could always tell. I think he thought we kids couldn't tell. But we could.

Best thing you can do for your family. Bravo and the best of luck to you.

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