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Thu Dec 14, 2017, 08:00 PM

Do you want to know what habanero peppers taste like without blowing your brains?

I just discovered and tasted Red Teardrop Cherry Tomatoes today. I was amazed. They taste exactly like habanero peppers but without the heat. Zero, nada.

They have that floral flavor that habaneros have, which you get to savor for, oh, maybe 5 seconds before the capsaicin kicks in.

http://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/Red_Teardrop_Cherry_Tomatoes_212.php

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Reply Do you want to know what habanero peppers taste like without blowing your brains? (Original post)
Xipe Totec Dec 2017 OP
populistdriven Dec 2017 #1
Xipe Totec Dec 2017 #2
Lucky Luciano Dec 2017 #3
Xipe Totec Dec 2017 #4
Lucky Luciano Dec 2017 #5
Xipe Totec Dec 2017 #6
Hortensis Dec 2017 #7
sir pball Dec 2017 #8

Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Thu Dec 14, 2017, 08:33 PM

1. Eating a Gallon of Salsa (8.5 lbs)

Thanks! I want seeds!

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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Thu Dec 14, 2017, 08:56 PM

3. I do love habaeros! The flavor + the heat is one of my favorites! nt

Edit: Looks like the subject lines in DU don’t allow the ñ!

Intended to say habañero of course!

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Response to Lucky Luciano (Reply #3)

Thu Dec 14, 2017, 09:23 PM

4. Habanero does not have an enye. Jalapeno does

It's

Habanero - from Habana, Cuba

Jalapeño - from Jalapa, Veracruz, Mexico.

For some reason, people insist on putting the ñ on habanero, and taking it off of Jalapeño.



(eta)

Notice that Habana has an 'n' in the last syllable, so it retains it when the ending vowel is dropped and the 'ero' suffix is attached. Jalapa does not have an 'n' on the last syllable, so it gains an 'eño' suffix, instead of 'ero' when the ending vowel is dropped.

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Response to Xipe Totec (Reply #4)

Thu Dec 14, 2017, 10:18 PM

5. DIdnt know that (obviously) - thanks! nt

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Response to Lucky Luciano (Reply #5)

Thu Dec 14, 2017, 11:03 PM

6. So much to learn. So little time

We are all drowning on the edge of a sea of knowledge.

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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sat Dec 16, 2017, 05:26 PM

7. Thanks, Xipe Totec. Those look worth seeking out.

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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sun Dec 17, 2017, 01:08 PM

8. Habanada chiles are even better.

They're a special variety of habanero bred by Cornell University to have all of the flavor of habaneros with literally zero heat (get it? Haba-Nada?) - they're flipping amazing, I can munch my way through a bag out of hand as easily as if they were cherries or strawberries. Fantastic for salsas and "normal" chili applications, totally unique and amazing for desserts and other sweets.

I've only ever seen the fruits themselves at the Union Square farmer's market, but seeds are readily available online.

http://smallfarms.cornell.edu/2015/04/06/habanada/

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