HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Home & Family » Cooking & Baking (Group) » I wish I had a big bowl o...

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:00 PM

I wish I had a big bowl of Polish Salad

Hell, I wish I had some of the fermented cucumber (NO VINEGAR) polish pickles needed to make this.

http://www.polskafoods.com/polish-recipes/potato-salad-recipe

23 replies, 1276 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 23 replies Author Time Post
Reply I wish I had a big bowl of Polish Salad (Original post)
The Polack MSgt Aug 2018 OP
dhol82 Aug 2018 #1
The Polack MSgt Aug 2018 #2
dhol82 Aug 2018 #4
dhol82 Aug 2018 #5
The Polack MSgt Aug 2018 #6
dhol82 Aug 2018 #8
The Polack MSgt Aug 2018 #10
geardaddy Aug 2018 #14
The Polack MSgt Aug 2018 #16
geardaddy Aug 2018 #18
dem in texas Aug 2018 #20
geardaddy Aug 2018 #22
dem in texas Aug 2018 #13
Hortensis Aug 2018 #21
procon Aug 2018 #3
The Polack MSgt Aug 2018 #7
procon Aug 2018 #9
The Polack MSgt Aug 2018 #11
procon Aug 2018 #12
Grasswire2 Aug 2018 #23
geardaddy Aug 2018 #15
The Polack MSgt Aug 2018 #17
geardaddy Aug 2018 #19

Response to The Polack MSgt (Original post)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:06 PM

1. Interesting

Never really thought about how pickles becomes pickled.
Will now look at jars and do tastings.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dhol82 (Reply #1)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:14 PM

2. Pickling with vinegar is quick and consistant

So most commercial pickles and sauerkraut do it that way.

But you could also make a brine with just salt water and spice and just wet the cucumbers or cabbage then leave alone in the dark - they will ferment and sour naturally.


Same concept as Kimchee - except cabbage kimchee doesn't need added water - I like it when it ferments to the point that it's translucent. SO SOUR and peppery

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #2)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:29 PM

4. In terms of kimchee:

I am not prepared to bury my eathenware pot in the backyard for six months.



Other than that, I might try to make my own pickles or sauerkraut.
It’s sad that I live in NYC and there are people ready and willing to make all this stuff.
They just make it too easy.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dhol82 (Reply #4)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:31 PM

5. And, just as a point of reference, my mother made her own sauerkraut on occasion.

It was always surprising since she was the worlds worst cook.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dhol82 (Reply #4)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:35 PM

6. I'm jealous

I can get home made kimchee all day everyday but natural pickles or sauerkraut aren't easy to find in St Louis

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #6)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:40 PM

8. There is a place in NY that sells fresh sauerkraut.

I can also find it at the Amish farm stand.
I still wash it down to get rid of most of the salt and then sauté it down with onions and garlic.
Soooooooo good!
On occasion, i have made holiday goose with that sauerkraut stuffing. Heaven! Sauerkraut with goose fat.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dhol82 (Reply #8)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:57 PM

10. My wife makes a fantastic appetizer with Kraut

In an almost oil less iron frypan, fry lightly salted chicken skin strips until crisp crisp crisp, remove and let stand on paper towels

Drain the majority (but not all) chicken fat

Rinse some sauerkraut and pat dry, fry in rendered fat until cabbage is slightly translucent

Season cabbage with Togarashi (Japanese red pepper powder this available in most big supermarket's Asian section. There are 2 types Ichimii Togarashi - which is just the red pepper and Shichimii Togarashi which translates as 7 spice seasoning. Either works fine. Japanese red chilis are not very hot and have a very specific flavor - I would not substitute other pepper powder here.)

remove from heat and allow to cool

Mix chicken skin and cabbage and serve at room temp


SO DAMN DELICIOUS

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #6)

Thu Aug 23, 2018, 10:56 AM

14. I make my own fermented pickles.

They're easy to do. Just put them in brine (make sure they're super clean) with all the fixings you like (garlic, peppercorns, dill, mustard seed). Add a handful of some fresh grape leaves (this keeps the cukes crunchier) and put the top on the jar with a brewing valve and let it sit for a week.

After a week the brine should be a little cloudy and the cukes will lose their very green color. Put them in the fridge and they'll keep for a couple of months.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geardaddy (Reply #14)

Thu Aug 23, 2018, 11:01 AM

16. Thank you Geardaddy

how is the smell?

My wife sometimes does Japanese pickles - which is a dry process oddly enough - and that bowl needs to stay in the garage...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #16)

Thu Aug 23, 2018, 11:17 AM

18. It doesn't smell at all

at least not to my nose. If you keep them between 60 and 70 degrees, they'll ferment in a week.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to geardaddy (Reply #14)

Thu Aug 23, 2018, 02:01 PM

20. Grape Leaves

I have read recipes in old cookbooks calling for grape leaves when making pickles., didn't know why. You have solved the mystery!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dem in texas (Reply #20)

Fri Aug 24, 2018, 09:58 AM

22. Glad to help!

I've also seen horseradish leaves, cherry tree leaves, and oak leaves. Those were all new to me!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #2)

Thu Aug 23, 2018, 03:23 AM

13. My mother-in-Law used to make sauerkraut

She made it from cabbages she grew in her garden. I don't remember all the steps, I know she'd put the shredded cabbage layered with salt in a big stoneware crock and weighted down. Once it was done, she'd put it in quart size glass jars. I know there other steps involved. I wish I had asked her many more questions about her gardening and food preparation.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #2)

Thu Aug 23, 2018, 03:51 PM

21. I like to pickle a jar of Chinese mustard greens, or whatever

might catch my eye, in plain salt brine. Love the flavor, and the ease.

Dissolve salt until a raw egg floats -- at least that's what a neighbor taught me. I use about 1/4 cup per quart jar. Then add prepped veggies, set aside several days to do its work until the water turns a yellowish color, and then into the fridge. It'll last several months, nothing here in my part of Georgia can live in salt brine, so more well cleaned veggies can just be added if desired.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Original post)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:27 PM

3. Looks yummy!

Tell me about those pickles, is it something you make yourself or is there a brand name?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to procon (Reply #3)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:38 PM

7. I wish I had a national brand to recommend

In the Pittsburgh area there were several Delis that made pickles and plenty of east European grandmas that canned their own.


Out here in the prairie I'm at a loss

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #7)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 09:46 PM

9. It would probably be even harder to find out on the west coast.

I don't want to make pickles so what would be a good substitute? A sour pickle, dills?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to procon (Reply #9)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 10:01 PM

11. I would try a good quality "Polish" dill

They would at least have the right spices and the right amount of garlic

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #11)

Wed Aug 22, 2018, 10:06 PM

12. That makes sense, I'm going to give it a try, thanks! nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to procon (Reply #9)

Sun Aug 26, 2018, 01:49 AM

23. The "Bubies" brand is a fermented pickle. You'll find it in the refrigerated section.

You might even be able to find the fermented dilled green tomatoes. Delicious.

Incidentally, Trader Joe's makes a fermented sauerkraut with sliced persian cucumbers. It's delicious. In the fresh chilled case.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink



Response to geardaddy (Reply #15)

Thu Aug 23, 2018, 11:11 AM

17. This seems easy, I shied away from trying

to make pickles - I figured it would be a pain in the neck.

now I just have to find an old Polish, Ukrainian or Latvian grandma to tell me what spices go into the brine...

Or just google it I guess:
https://polishhousewife.com/ogorki-kiszone-polish-pickles/

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to The Polack MSgt (Reply #17)

Thu Aug 23, 2018, 11:20 AM

19. Yum. That looks like a good recipe.

Our garden is producing massive amounts of cukes, but I haven't had time to ferment any pickles yet this season. I think I'll try your recipe. I love the idea of horseradish in the pickles.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread