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Sun Dec 16, 2018, 04:34 PM

Does anyone in here make their own pasta?

I want to get a pasta machine for my wife for Christmas.

Iíve seen some on amazon, but I canít decide among them.

We have a Sur La Table in our neighborhood in case itís something not available on Amazon.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

22 replies, 1052 views

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Arrow 22 replies Author Time Post
Reply Does anyone in here make their own pasta? (Original post)
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 OP
sinkingfeeling Dec 2018 #1
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 #4
sinkingfeeling Dec 2018 #6
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 #10
Buzz cook Dec 2018 #17
Major Nikon Dec 2018 #2
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 #7
Major Nikon Dec 2018 #15
Ninga Dec 2018 #3
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 #8
Lindsay Dec 2018 #5
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 #9
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 #11
procon Dec 2018 #12
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 #13
mitch96 Dec 2018 #14
Adsos Letter Dec 2018 #16
mitch96 Dec 2018 #18
dem in texas Dec 2018 #19
Fix The Stupid Dec 2018 #20
wryter2000 Dec 2018 #21
hibbing Dec 2018 #22

Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 04:45 PM

1. I have a Cuisinart one from the late 70s. I think I might have

used it a dozen times.

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #1)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 04:48 PM

4. Is it just too much work?

She loves to cook, but I donít want to get her something that is more trouble than itís worth.

She has a Cuisinart. Perhaps I should look at attachments for that.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Reply #4)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 04:56 PM

6. Mine is a table top model. It was a hassle, back then, to

find the right flour. Fresh pasta is delicious. There were only 2 of us to eat it and now it's just me.

If she has a Kitchenaid stand mixer, just get the attachment.

Mine is an electric machine that mixes the dough and then can be extruded into many shapes through metal dies.

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #6)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 05:15 PM

10. We are really close to San Francisco, and drive in to The City often.

Iím thinking that a good Italian market or specialty store might make finding the proper flour easier.

Thank you for the advice on the Kitchenaid attachment. She has one of the large Kitchenaid mixers, so I will check an attachment for that. I think that she would enjoy the option of making a variety of shapes.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Reply #10)

Mon Dec 17, 2018, 12:05 AM

17. The proper flour is Duram wheat.

The steps for making pasta are pretty straight forward. It does take a bit of time to get them to work right.

Maybe find a cooking school near by and buy here some lessons. Sur La Table does offer class including one in pasta making.
https://www.surlatable.com/category/cat2211278/In+Store+Classes

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 04:46 PM

2. I used to do it all the time, but not so much anymore

So there's a couple of different ways to do it as you can go with either an extruder or rolling machine. Of the two methods I prefer the rolling machine.

Naturally you can just go with a hand crank rolling machine which is pretty cheap and generally consists of a flat pasta roller and various cutting blades for the types of pasta you want to make. Moving up from there you have machine driven models some of which attach to an existing motor like a Kitchenade mixer or some have their own dedicated motors. The motor driven models are nice unless you have two people doing it as it's so much easier to have one person do the cranking.

With either method you'll want a rack to store the pasta on as you make it as this works much better than trying to lay it out on the counter.

I never thought the results are that much better than using store bought dried pasta.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #2)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 04:56 PM

7. Thanks, Major Nikon.

We took a trip to Italy back in September, and part of the experience was going to a private home and making homemade pasta and ravioli. We kneaded and rolled out the dough, and cut the noodles by hand. It was a lot of fun, and the results were delicious!

Perhaps I should reconsider. Iím pretty sure part of the pleasure of it stemmed from being in someoneís private home in Rome. Maybe it wouldnít be as much fun at home in our kitchen.

Thanks again for taking the time to provide the information.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Reply #7)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 08:26 PM

15. I enjoy making things from scratch

Making pasta from scratch is kinda fun, especially if it's a team effort. I suggest you get a hand rolling kit and give it a try. You can get a cheap hand crank model for around $25. If you find yourself doing it all the time it might be worth getting a better one.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 04:47 PM

3. I make my own pasta. Here are a few thoughts....

There are 3 basic ways to make pasta.

Mix dough by hand, roll out by hand, and cut by hand. (Once was enough for me...too much work)

Then there is the little pasta attachment for KitchenAid stand mixers. The type that has cutters is the best IMO. There is an attachment that extrudes the dough into thin tube type pasta, but extruding alters the chemistry of the pasta and it loses its fresh flavor.

My pasta maker is 53 yrs old. It is a bit heftier than a current day Imperial Pasta Machine, but exactly the same.

Hope this helps.
Happy to answer any other questions.

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Response to Ninga (Reply #3)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 05:05 PM

8. Thank you, Ninga.

We did the mix dough/roll out/cut by hand process on a trip to Rome in September (flat noodles and ravioli). It was a lot of work, as you noted (results were delicious).

Maybe I should try some innocent questioning to see how much we would actually use it.

Thanks again for taking the time to respond.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 04:51 PM

5. I use my pasta machine

for polymer clay, not pasta. But the Marcato Atlas machines are supposed to be the best quality machines that are readily available for home use. (I went through several cheaper ones before I got my Atlas, and it's been a joy to use.)

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Response to Lindsay (Reply #5)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 05:09 PM

9. Thank you, Lindsay.

The Mercato machines are the ones I have looked at so far. Sounds like the Atlas model(?) is the one to focus on.

Thank you for sharing your experience.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 05:17 PM

11. Thanks for all of the responses.

Youíve all given me food for thought about the food.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 05:30 PM

12. Still using the pasta gizmo on my trusty 20 yo Kitchenaid.

I use Durum Wheat Flour for my pasta because it holds up throughout the process as the machinery is not as gentle as the handmade pastas. I make just enough for the recipe and usually chill the dough and the finished pasta before cooking it. I don't keep pasta because I don't think fresh pasta tastes as good after a night in the fridge, but that's just my tastes.

The Kitchenaid makes several varieties, but I usually make the same 2-3 types all the time. Once you figure out how the gizmo works its a lot of fun and the fresh pasta is great.

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Response to procon (Reply #12)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 05:35 PM

13. Thanks for the insights, procon.

I think I should do some subtle interrogating to find out how much we would actually use it.

The Durham Wheat Flour is a timely suggestion. I am diabetic, and wheat flour products are generally better for my blood sugar levels.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 05:43 PM

14. "you can just go with a hand crank rolling machine which is pretty cheap"

That's what my Mom used back in the '50s.. It was a hand operated gizmo with a clamp arrangement to attach it to the work table. My Pops got it for her in Italy..I don't remember all the work (lots of flour in the kitchen!) but I do remember the delicious pasta. It just melted in your mouth and you were left with just wonderful flavor. She also made what she called Chinese noodles. Again melt in your mouth goodness...

m

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Response to mitch96 (Reply #14)

Sun Dec 16, 2018, 09:06 PM

16. Thanks, mitch96.

Someone else also suggested a "hand operated gizmo." That sounds like a good way to start. If we find ourselves using it fairly often it might be worth spending for a nice machine.

Sounds like your mom was quite the cook. Good memories, I imagine.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Reply #16)

Mon Dec 17, 2018, 11:19 AM

18. "Sounds like your mom was quite the cook"

Yes she was.. Very plain, simple and delicious meals. She was a waitress all her life and picked up lots of ideas and techniques along the way...She is long gone and I wish I picked her brain a little more.. She was a depression era 20 something, knew how to stretch a food dollar and also make it taste good...
m

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2018, 01:07 PM

19. Someone gve a hand crank machine, used once

Donated to the thrift store. Sometimes you can get on kitchen gadget over-flow and some of the gadgets have to go. Besides, can buy fresh made pasta at the store. Still make my noodles from scratch. they are easier to make than pasta. I just roll out the dough and cut the noodles, let them dry while making the meal and then drop in the boiling water, not many steps. No getting a gadget out of the cabinet then then having to put away.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Mon Dec 17, 2018, 01:49 PM

20. I've made a ton. A few tips:


1) never use water! 5 room temp. eggs to 2 cups of flour. Yes, that's it. The best pasta.

2) never use water! - Again, the temptation will be there to reduce the # of eggs and just make up the difference with water, which leads us to point# 3...

3) never use water!

If you use water, the pasta just tastes bland.

You can sub an egg or 2 with Olive oil, but even then...not the same.

It is super easy. All we have is a $20 table mounted roller. That thing has made MANY batches and still works flawlessly.

Yes, it is more work, but the payoff is worth it. There simply is no substitute.



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Response to Fix The Stupid (Reply #20)

Tue Dec 18, 2018, 01:54 PM

21. I love my hand crank roller

How many eggs for 1 cup of flour? I guess I could use 2 plus a yolk.

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Response to Adsos Letter (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2018, 12:41 AM

22. I have a Marcato Atlas hand cranker

I make the dough in the food processor, it just comes together nicely in there real quick. It is a learning process. My tips, be sure to let the dough rest for at least a half hour. The other, be sure you run it through the rollers, fold, run and so on until you get a nice consistency. One thing that I enjoy is making the dough at the thinnest setting and making a really "light" lasagna. It is so delicate, yum.

Peace

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