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Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:12 PM

10 Essential Native American Recipes

This is really cool. Plus, the chef, Sean Sherman aka Sioux Chef, has written a cookbook. I reserved it at the library, I look forward to working with it.

Sean Sherman’s 10 Essential Native American Recipes
The founder of The Sioux Chef, a company devoted to Indigenous foods, created recipes to showcase tribal diversity across the lower 48 states.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/04/dining/native-american-recipes-sioux-chef.html


The recipes are from all over the US and are at the link.

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Arrow 12 replies Author Time Post
Reply 10 Essential Native American Recipes (Original post)
mysteryowl Nov 2019 OP
Major Nikon Nov 2019 #1
mysteryowl Nov 2019 #2
htuttle Nov 2019 #3
mysteryowl Nov 2019 #5
Major Nikon Nov 2019 #10
htuttle Nov 2019 #4
mysteryowl Nov 2019 #6
htuttle Nov 2019 #7
Major Nikon Nov 2019 #8
mysteryowl Nov 2019 #9
Major Nikon Nov 2019 #11
trof Nov 2019 #12

Response to mysteryowl (Original post)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:15 PM

1. Unfortunately the recipes are behind a paywall

I love Native American recipes. Unfortunately most of them have ingredients that are hard to find.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #1)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:17 PM

2. I can see the recipes.

Which one do you want and I will post it.

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Response to mysteryowl (Reply #2)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:22 PM

3. Do they have one for fry bread?

I cheat when I make it, and just drop bread dough into the oil, then put things on it.

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Response to htuttle (Reply #3)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:25 PM

5. Nope. How about wildrice and berries...

Wild Rice and Berries With Popped Rice
Ingredients

1 ¼ cups long-grain wild rice (about 8 ounces), rinsed (see Note)
½ cup mixed dried berries (any combination of cranberries, blueberries or sour cherries)
3 tablespoons maple syrup
¼ cup whole hazelnuts, crushed
2 tablespoons hazelnut oil
Fine sea salt
Whole chive stems (or scallions, thinly sliced on the diagonal), for garnish

Nutritional Information

Preparation

Heat the oven to 350 degrees.
In a large saucepan, bring 5 cups water to a boil over high. Stir in 1 cup wild rice along with the dried berries and maple syrup. Once the mixture comes back to a boil, reduce the heat so the liquid is just simmering, cover and cook until the grains begin to open, 20 to 40 minutes, checking doneness after about 20 minutes. (The rice is done when it has opened slightly, is tender and has quadrupled in size.)
Drain the excess liquid from the rice. (The cloudy cooking liquid tastes sweet and nutty and can be sipped on its own, reserved for use in the roast turkey with berry-mint sauce and black walnuts, or used as a stock substitute.)
Meanwhile, toast the hazelnuts: Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Arrange the hazelnuts in a single layer on a baking sheet and toast them until the skin blisters and cracks, and they begin to smell nutty, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer the nuts to a clean dish towel and massage them aggressively to remove most of the skins. Crush the nuts directly in the towel using the flat side of a knife or the bottom of a small, heavy frying pan.
Add the remaining 1/4 cup rice to a dry medium skillet and cook the rice over high heat, shaking the pan, until it begins to darken and about half of the kernels have popped, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from the heat.
Drizzle the boiled rice with the hazelnut oil and season to taste with salt. Divide among bowls and garnish with the popped rice, hazelnuts and chives.

Tip

Hand-harvested wild rice that has been gathered by tribal members according to traditional methods is available for order online from Native Harvest.

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Response to htuttle (Reply #3)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:57 PM

10. The author's recipes are inspired by Native American dishes before the Europeans came

Fry bread came after as it was made from basic staples like flour and lard, neither of which the natives would have had prior to the arrival of the Europeans.

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Response to mysteryowl (Reply #2)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:24 PM

4. Found a way to access it

They all look delicious, but are far fancier than mere fry bread, lol.

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Response to htuttle (Reply #4)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:26 PM

6. It will fun to try them now and then is what I am planning on.

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Response to mysteryowl (Reply #6)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:29 PM

7. Lots of interesting pairings going on

Blackberries and salmon, for example

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Response to mysteryowl (Reply #2)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:50 PM

8. #3, #9, and #10

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #8)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 07:53 PM

9. #3 Roast Turkey With Berry-Mint Sauce and Black Walnuts

Roast Turkey With Berry-Mint Sauce and Black Walnuts

Ingredients
1 (10- to 12-pound) turkey, preferably a heritage breed
Coarse sea salt
1 bunch fresh sage
3 cups wild rice cooking liquid (reserved from Wild Rice and Berries With Popped Rice, if desired) or turkey stock, plus more as needed
6 medium leeks, white and pale green portions only, halved lengthwise, cut into 2-inch pieces and rinsed clean
2 tablespoons sunflower oil
½ cup maple syrup, plus more as needed
3 cups fresh raspberries or blackberries
3 cups fresh or frozen cranberries
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint, plus more as needed
½ cup black walnuts (see Note), lightly toasted and chopped
Pea shoots or microgreens, for garnish

Preparation

Remove giblets from the turkey cavity and discard or reserve for another use. Pat the turkey dry using paper towels. Rub the turkey all over with 1/2 teaspoon salt per pound of turkey. Tuck the sage sprigs inside the turkey cavity.
Set the turkey on a baking sheet, breast-side up. Place in the refrigerator, uncovered, for at least 4 hours and up to 6 hours to dry out the skin (this will help it crisp when it roasts).
When you are ready to cook the turkey, remove it from the refrigerator and allow it to come to room temperature, 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
Heat the oven to 450 degrees. Pour the rice cooking liquid or stock into a large roasting pan and add the leeks. Place a roasting rack on top, then transfer the turkey to the roasting rack, breast-side up, and tuck the wings underneath. Brush the exposed turkey generously with the oil. Transfer to the oven and roast, 30 minutes. Baste the turkey with the pan juices, adding rice cooking liquid or stock as needed to make sure there is a 1/2-inch layer of liquid at the bottom of the pan.
Reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees and continue roasting, basting every 30 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of a thigh reaches 165 degrees, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. If the skin begins to darken too much, tent the turkey loosely with aluminum foil. Brush 1/4 cup maple syrup over the turkey. Transfer turkey to a cutting board to rest for 30 minutes before carving.
Transfer 3/4 cup of the turkey pan juices to a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Add the raspberries or blackberries, cranberries and the mint to the saucepan, stir with a wooden spoon to combine, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, until the cranberries have popped open, the raspberries have fallen apart and the liquid is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, 10 to 12 minutes. Stir in the remaining 1/4 cup maple syrup, then add maple syrup and mint according to taste.
Carve the turkey. Smear some berry sauce on each plate. Top with the leeks then the turkey. Garnish with walnuts and pea shoots or microgreens, and pass more berry sauce alongside.

Tip
Black walnuts are smaller and more flavorful than most commercial varieties and are worth seeking out (they are available online). They’re very perishable, so are best stored in the refrigerator or freezer.

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Response to mysteryowl (Reply #9)

Mon Nov 4, 2019, 08:01 PM

11. This looks very interesting

I might have to do a test of it to see if I'd want to do it on Thanksgiving. This time of year heritage turkeys can be found, although not easily or cheaply.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #1)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 08:48 PM

12. Yeah, same for me.

Don't subscribe.

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