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Sat Jan 4, 2020, 11:22 AM

Remembering the food of my childhood

I got to thinking about how food has changed since I was growing up in the 60s. When we think of the food of the era, we tend to think of those molded jello salads and food creations that resemble a child’s art project. But really, these were special-occasion things we rarely encountered. Here’s what I remember:

Orange juice came as a frozen can of concentrate that you dumped into a pitcher and stirred up. Frozen juice concentrate may still be available, but I haven’t noticed it in eons. Alternatively, there was Tang, which was deemed to be healthy because the astronauts drank it.

Hams came in cans, which needed to be kept in the refrigerator. The cans opened with little metal keys that never worked right. Once opened, the hams were pale, flabby, can-shaped lumps surrounded by some kind of jelly.

Fish came frozen in rectangular bricks, which needed to be put in the fridge to thaw a couple of days before cooking.

Pineapple was also frozen. I’m not sure if canned pineapple was available then, but I only ever saw the frozen kind. The only time we ever saw a fresh pineapple was when the neighbors brought us one from Hawaii.

Tuna was only available canned in oil. If you were on a diet, you had to rinse the oil off.

Canned clams were also a thing and made food fancy. Canned artichokes also made food fancy.

Coffee was either instant or made in a percolator. Chock Full o’ Nuts coffee that you ground in the machine at the store was the fancy stuff.

Yogurt was not a thing. There was pudding, which came canned unless you cooked up your own on the stovetop

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Reply Remembering the food of my childhood (Original post)
spinbaby Jan 2020 OP
FM123 Jan 2020 #1
JDC Jan 2020 #11
Phoenix61 Jan 2020 #2
Kali Jan 2020 #3
spinbaby Jan 2020 #7
GP6971 Jan 2020 #31
DURHAM D Jan 2020 #4
yellowdogintexas Jan 2020 #24
woodsprite Jan 2020 #56
Backseat Driver Jan 2020 #5
MissMillie Jan 2020 #19
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #45
woodsprite Jan 2020 #55
packman Jan 2020 #6
DURHAM D Jan 2020 #8
japple Jan 2020 #9
madamesilverspurs Jan 2020 #10
MissMillie Jan 2020 #20
spinbaby Jan 2020 #21
choie Jan 2020 #42
woodsprite Jan 2020 #57
Mme. Defarge Jan 2020 #27
Ohiogal Jan 2020 #33
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #46
Freddie Jan 2020 #12
flotsam Jan 2020 #13
Retrograde Jan 2020 #16
spinbaby Jan 2020 #18
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #47
spinbaby Jan 2020 #60
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #63
Ohiogal Jan 2020 #34
Retrograde Jan 2020 #14
Warpy Jan 2020 #15
Ohiogal Jan 2020 #35
Warpy Jan 2020 #67
MissMillie Jan 2020 #17
dem in texas Jan 2020 #22
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #48
Vinca Jan 2020 #23
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #49
Vinca Jan 2020 #61
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #62
Vinca Jan 2020 #66
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #68
Vinca Jan 2020 #69
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #25
Ohiogal Jan 2020 #36
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #38
blm Jan 2020 #26
Mme. Defarge Jan 2020 #28
The Velveteen Ocelot Jan 2020 #29
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #39
MissMillie Jan 2020 #59
Ohiogal Jan 2020 #30
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #40
catrose Jan 2020 #32
Ohiogal Jan 2020 #37
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #41
3catwoman3 Jan 2020 #43
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #50
PlanetBev Jan 2020 #44
Chipper Chat Jan 2020 #51
Chipper Chat Jan 2020 #52
think4yourself Jan 2020 #53
Cousin Dupree Jan 2020 #54
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #64
lark Jan 2020 #58
Laura PourMeADrink Jan 2020 #65

Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 11:32 AM

1. Wow, brings back memories...

I also remember TV dinners that you had to fold back the tin foil on one of the sections - maybe the "delicious" apple pie dessert?

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Response to FM123 (Reply #1)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 02:11 PM

11. Salisbury Steak was my favorite when I was a kid

W/ mashed potatoes, mixed veg and the apple desert you mention above to cap it off. That was a real treat.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 11:32 AM

2. I remember Shake-A-Pudding

It was a cup with a lid and a packet of instant pudding. You mixed it with you milk at lunch.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 11:50 AM

3. all meat had to be cooked well done

cambells canned soup was about the only kind (sometimes lipton dried chicken noodle) except after Thanksgiving when we might get leftover turkey noodle soup.

cold cereal on school mornings, but never the good all-sugar kinds we really wanted.

salad was iceburg, bland tomatoes, cucumber, sliced radish, green onion - maybe avocado if the relatives in CA shipped us a few and bottled Italian dressing.

lots of casseroles, often with strange things to add texture such as nuts or crispy "Chinese" noodles. ( )

"store bought" (white) bread was it, and still considered by my Mother as an "improvement" over homemade. peanutbutter and honey sandwiches.

vegetables were mostly canned

apples were red delicious. grapes were boycotted to support farmworkers - didn't leave much for fresh fruit except oranges. occasionally cherries or strawberries were around, but often sliced and sugared to put on some other desert item like cake or ice cream. grapefruit came from a relative's tree. same with apricots. peaches were picked at the orchard in season. some were frozen in sugar for later. the apricots made into preserves/jam. huge seed-filled watermelon in summer, canteloupes occasionally.

still frozen juice around, but Tang tasted better back then - must have had a unsafe ingredient that tasted good. it was the vitamin C that was "healthy." my Grandmother's friend (cousin?) used to serve us special chicken salad sandwiches and welche's frozen grape juice in cut crystal glasses - wooo that was special.

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Response to Kali (Reply #3)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 12:37 PM

7. Salads!

I remember the salad menu at the diner we frequented consisted of a choice of iceberg lettuce with pale tomatoes, cottage cheese with canned peaches, or applesauce. Thousand island dressing was popular. I don’t think they’d invented ranch dressing yet.

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Response to Kali (Reply #3)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:42 PM

31. all meat had to be cooked well done

Especially pork. Supermarkets starting showing up in our area in the early 50s, but old habits die hard. I remember my mother's shopping routine...first stop to the butcher, then the bakery and then to the small supermarket (Grand Union) for canned vegetables and finally to the local fish market. During the summer we went to the local farm market for vegetables.

Pork had to be well cooked which our kids today just don't understand. The local butcher shops at that time sourced their product locally and the hog farmers fed their hogs with "swill"...whatever was left over...garbage etc. So it had to be cooked well to reduce the chance of Trichinosis.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 12:05 PM

4. Milk was not processed.

It went straight from the cow, to the separator, to your table and tasted awful when the cows ate certain weeds.

I am older than you are.

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Response to DURHAM D (Reply #4)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 02:11 AM

24. nothing worse than when the milk cow gets in the wild onions

or for that matter the yard chickens

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Response to DURHAM D (Reply #4)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 10:52 AM

56. We always had fresh milk delivery when I was growing up.

I really didn't like drinking milk at my boyfriend's house (now husband) because his mom wouldn't spend money on fresh milk when they could use powdered and always have "fresh" milk without having to run to the grocery store.

Ewww! I remember refusing to drink milk when the cows had gotten into onion grass. I also remember the milk getting delivered to school in the big stainless steel milk cans and going through lunch line and filling your plastic cup from either the white or chocolate milk dispenser.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 12:12 PM

5. You must be older because





Cartoon Welsh's Grape jelly jars subbed for juice glasses; with three kids, we collected them; just try to find those small glasses now except in vintage/antique stores.

My mom was a good cook but made lots of SOS (S&*t on a shingle or Welsh Rarebit on toast points in a pinch - No Kraft Mac & Cheese w/ketchup or not was on our table.

We never had salmon filets - canned salmon loaves, real mashed potatos, and peas; fish sticks, anyone?

Braunschweiger lunch sandwiches were swanky, well... because it was just like French goose pate from jailed geese force fed with mallets.

Percolated coffee from the clear glass stemmed off a gas range; a lot fewer electric ranges, and no Mr. Coffee's or Keurig K-cups.

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Response to Backseat Driver (Reply #5)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 08:14 PM

19. canned salmon--OMG!!!

My mom used this to make "creamed salmon" which was a lot like creamed chip-beef. A white sauce w/ the salmon, frozen peas, onions, cut-up hard-boiled egg, and if she had a can of mushrooms (we never had fresh mushrooms) she'd add those too.

She'd serve it over boiled potatoes.

It was my brother's favorite.

Come to think of it, I may surprise Dad & Sis with this one some time soon. I'm sure they haven't had it in YEARS!!! Thanks for putting the idea in my head.

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Response to MissMillie (Reply #19)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 08:49 AM

45. Ah..the ole white sauce! We had left over ham chunks in

White sauce over mashed potatoes

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Response to MissMillie (Reply #19)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 10:48 AM

55. I always keep 2-3 cans of salmon in the pantry

One of my favorite meals that my mom made was "Salmon loaf". You cleaned, deboned, and flaked the canned salmon, added a cup of left over mashed potatoes 2-3 tbls horseradish, 1/4 c. ketchup, 1 tsp dill weed, and an egg. Shaped it into a loaf and topped it with a glaze of ketchup sprinkled lightly with more dill.

The other thing I like to do with it was a recipe I learned from my high school music director: Salmon mould. Flaked salmon, cream cheese, horseradish and a few drops of Liquid Smoke. We performed an Elizabethan Rout every Christmas and this was always one of the appetizers served with Wheat Thins.

Yummmm!

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 12:23 PM

6. And that white lardish stuff in a bag

with a small packet of yellow dye which you squeezed out and mixed in the bag to give you an imitation butter. I do believe it was white veggie solid Crisco now that I think about it.
My dad used to love Dinty Moore stewed beef in a can which was thick gravy, a few chunks of beef,and some carrots. And, of course, Jello mixed with Canada Dry or just plain water to make a drink - sickening sweet, but what did we know.

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Response to packman (Reply #6)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 01:23 PM

8. LOL A young cousin recently showed

me a recipe that was written by her great aunt. She asked me "What is Oleo?"

She had tried to figure it out but this is what she was seeing -

https://www.oleolife.com/

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 01:58 PM

9. Fried Spam with cheese on top was occasionally on our table, but we were a military family so

we learned to like it. We ate a lot of canned vegetables and canned fruit, esp. fruit cocktail. How we hated the grapes that came in fruit cocktail, but we fought over the single cherry in each can. Bread was either Wonder Bread or Colonial Bread. Our family moved to Germany in 1959 and we were in heaven with all of that good German bread, salt rolls, butter and cheese.

Mom and Dad both came from farming families and they planted a garden most years when we lived stateside. During the summer we had homegrown tomatoes, okra, squash, beans, watermelons, but we didn't get a freezer until Dad retired.

I remember that ice cream mostly came in pints and quarts. Some of the quarts (at least the ice cream that Mom bought at the base Commissary) came in long rectangular cartons and was served in slices. There was not a huge flavor selection back in the 50s 60s or 70s.

Soda was a rare treat. But we did have Koolaid fairly often in the summer. Orange juice meant Tang which we loved if we could make it ourselves using 3 times the amount called for in the directions.

Mom was a great baker and all of our treats were home baked cookies, pies, cakes, with the exception of Nabisco graham crackers. Cheese was Kraft or Borden sliced American. Soup was Campbells tomato or chicken noodle.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 02:04 PM

10. Pizza

Actually, Chef Boyardi in a box. Had a packet of just-add-water stuff to make dough, a little can of sauce to spread on the dough, and a packet of cheese sprinkles to be added after meat topping (ours was usually crumbled and fried hamburger).


.

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Response to madamesilverspurs (Reply #10)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 08:18 PM

20. Chinese food kits

La Choy, maybe. I think egg foo young. If I remember correctly, you had to add your own eggs, but you got canned veggies and sprouts and a packet to mix up the gravy.

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Response to MissMillie (Reply #20)

Sun Jan 5, 2020, 10:39 AM

21. I remember those!

There was a can of some kind of glop and a can of crunchy chow mein noodles. I think there may have been another can of sauce—my memory is a little vague on that point. We thought it was Chinese food.

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Response to spinbaby (Reply #21)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 01:07 AM

42. "La Choy makes Chinese food swing American"

tv commercial jingle

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Response to MissMillie (Reply #20)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 10:57 AM

57. I almost picked up the Chicken Chow Mein one yesterday

at the grocery store! I did get some of the bamboo shoots, bean sprouts, and water chestnuts to add to our beef/broccoli. It makes it go further when my 19yo son has dinner at home

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Response to madamesilverspurs (Reply #10)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:21 PM

27. I was 8 or 9 when I first heard of

Pizza pie!

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Response to madamesilverspurs (Reply #10)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:52 PM

33. We never had pizza for dinner, though

It was more of a snack or a party food when I was a kid.

And yogurt was something you had to buy at the health food store.

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Response to madamesilverspurs (Reply #10)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 08:52 AM

46. Omg. Chef Boyardi. My fav .the ravioli in a can

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 02:12 PM

12. Lots of Campbell's soup

It was cheap and we all liked it. Lunches and sometimes Chunky Beef soup (it was really good then) for dinner. French toast for dinner right before payday (didn’t occur to me how cheap that was til I had to buy food). Soda was a rare treat but we always had milk. Had a milkman and a bread man who sold wonderful Sunbeam “squishy white”. Practically never went out to eat, occasionally Dad took us to the nearby city for 15-cent hamburgers at McDonald’s.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 04:11 PM

13. Here's the thing

My bet is your mother owned 6 spices or less-and one of my them was "seasoned salt". Exotic family recipes might require soy sauce or hot sauce even though most required "Veg-All"...The Fancy shit with colorful fruit and aspic is bullshit=nobodies Momma made that. My family recipe book included hamburger and Veg All in one case being "Japanese" when " a teaspoon of soy sauce was added while the same recipe with "one teaspoon" of "hot sauce" was "Mexican". We are ACTUALLY now blessed with a large spice cabinet and that is a good thing. You should try sazon as a meat rub.

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Response to flotsam (Reply #13)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 05:44 PM

16. Well-aged herbs and spices!

c. 1970 spice racks were a big thing (I got one as a wedding present): collections of small matching bottles filled with all the dried herbs and spices anyone would want - and they all looked and tasted pretty much the same.

Salt, pepper (from a can), celery salt, garlic salt - what more do you need? I currently have a c. 1930s collection of spice jars that came unlabeled, so I can fill them with things I actually use, bought in bulk.

What I do miss from that time, though, are freeze-dried basil and freeze-dried bell peppers: they were handy when you were out of the fresh stuff.

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Response to flotsam (Reply #13)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 07:36 PM

18. Not even six

The only seasonings I can remember at home were salt, pepper, bay leaf, and cinnamon. Not even garlic.

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Response to spinbaby (Reply #18)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 08:55 AM

47. Poultry seasoning for Thanksgiving? And more pumpkin pie spices?

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #47)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 01:17 PM

60. The poultry went unseasoned.

I can’t remember what we did about pumpkin pie. I think my mother was convinced that seasoning was somehow bad for you.

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Response to spinbaby (Reply #60)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 02:13 PM

63. Probably a luxury. But remember my mom having

Like a small tin of mace and allspice that lasted liked 20 yrs

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Response to flotsam (Reply #13)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:54 PM

34. Mexican food was just not on anyone's radar

when I was a kid. I don’t think I ever had anything Mexican until I was in my 20s.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 04:12 PM

14. Frozen juices, canned soups

Last edited Sat Jan 4, 2020, 05:32 PM - Edit history (1)

lemon juice out of little plastic lemons. Most vegetables were canned as well. Spices and seasonings other than salt and canned black pepper hadn't been invented yet. I remember canned hams, although my grandmother used to prepare real ones with the bones and all: she was a good cook, unlike my mother, who thought convenience foods were the thing. For special occasions she would make steaks: thin cuts of meat placed under the broiler until they were the color and consistency of shoe leather. Hamburger Helper was her favorite: she was so surprised that I didn't have any on hand when she visited that she sent me several boxes.

Living in western New York we did have access to good local cherries, strawberries, apples, and corn in season. Otherwise it was canned green beans, iceberg lettuce, and pale, hard tomatoes in the winter. I saw my first eggplant after I moved out in the early 70s, and never even heard of avocados (except as a color) until I moved to California in the mid 1970s - I would take my parents grocery shopping when they visited and they couldn't identify a lot of the fresh fruits and vegetables.

OTOH, fast food was a special treat, as was eating out. Soft drinks were reserved for weekends: we drank milk or water with meals. And if you knew where to shop there were great sausages and other meats available, along with live poultry (my next door neighbors used to buy live chickens early in the week, let them run around for a few days, then have them for Sunday dinner). And there were daily deliveries of milk and cottage cheese (essential for Lent) as well as bread.

ETA: I had forgotten about the canned Chef Boyardee ravioli and spaghetti. It was years after I left home and was living on the other side of the country that I had ravioli that didn't come out of a can - and I liked it!

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 04:35 PM

15. Frozen stuff was a luxury until the late 50s, early 60s

mostly because those old refrigerators had space for a couple of ice cube trays and nothing else. If you gave up on ice for your drinks and injuries, you could store some frozen peas, maybe a couple of TV dinners in them. I know because those old fridges were standard issue in Boston apartments in the early 70s. Most of us only got TV dinners on Wednesday, the big grocery day back then.

I honestly don't remember much of the food of my childhood fondly. My mother despised cooking and it showed, although there were a few things she did well. My best memories were when we were on the road, traveling or moving, and eating in restaurants. Otherwise, it was Kraft Dinner or Campbell's or peanut butter sandwiches.

I do have some particularly hideous memories of things like canned asparagus.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #15)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:57 PM

35. My mother hated to cook, too

Although she did a decent job of providing dinner, but I don’t have any fond memories of anything she made. She was all about using convenience products and canned things.

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #35)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 03:13 PM

67. I remember disicovering fresh asparagus, properly cooked

After the army surplus green slime out of a can, it was quite a revelation.

I'm perfectly happy to enjoy it in season and forget about it the rest of the year.

Some things are actually better canned, like peaches and tomatoes, because they are canned at peak flavor instead of being picked rock hard and green, sprayed with ethylene, and never really ripen. I really miss having a garden and access to orchards.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sat Jan 4, 2020, 07:02 PM

17. We ate very well, for a large family w/o much money

There was almost always meat, potato (real) and veg (usually fresh) at every meal.

When I was really small, we had the milk delivered, but that ended near the end of the 60s.

Bread was usually white bread.

We had pasta at least once a week, usually with homemade meatballs.

We never had store-bought baked goods (cookies or cakes). In fact, dessert was rare.

Saturday would be the comfort food stuff: Shepherd's pie, American Chop Suey, baked Mac & cheese, homemade beans w/ franks, stuffed cabbage rolls.

Sunday dinner was an event: always a roast or a roasted bird (chicken or turkey), mashed potatoes w/ gravy, two vegetables, a big salad and a homemade pie or cake. Mom would work on this big meal while the rest of us spent the better part of the morning at Sunday School and church.

My mom was a deli manager, so it wasn't uncommon for her to bring home some sub rolls, a selection of cold cuts, cheese, lettuce & tomato, and some chips. Campbell's soup would show up too (tomato or chicken noodle). I'd say this happened at least every week to 10 days.

We didn't drink much juice, but I do remember both Tang and frozen concentrate.

We NEVER had soda. Could not afford it.

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Response to MissMillie (Reply #17)

Sun Jan 5, 2020, 03:28 PM

22. Our family meals were similar

In the late 1940's and early 50's, money was always tight, but we had home cooked, nutritious meals. Everyone (all 9 of Us) would have a small portion of meat, a large serving of potatoes or pasta, a cooked vegetable and salad or coleslaw. Supper was at 6:00 PM, no leftovers and you'd better be there or you would be eating a mustard and bread sandwich. We had desserts on Sundays. Usually pie (try cutting a pie into 9 equal slices). Only exception was for birthdays or holidays when my mother would bake some sort of cake.

My mother bought huge bags of apples, oranges or grapefruit and we always had fruit to eat. Plenty of cantaloupe and watermelon in the summer. We drank milk in the winter and iced tea in summer(no sugar). No soft drinks.

We carried our lunch to school, a sandwich (PBJ, baloney or on occasion, tuna fish), small snack sized bag of chips, a piece of fruit and 4 or 5 plain cookies.

All of us were very healthy; not fat and no cavities in our teeth.

My mother told me in 1938, when she was pregnant with my older brother, she went to the county farm agent and got pamphlets on food and nutrition and used these as guides for meal preparation. She did this because her mother (my grandmother) had pellagra in her youth.

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Response to dem in texas (Reply #22)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 09:02 AM

48. That's interesting about getting pamphlets. I think

Public service announcement and schools taught people things back then. Like the old food pyramid. Many of us had the same mix - a protein, starch, vegetable, & milk

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Sun Jan 5, 2020, 04:35 PM

23. My grandmother bought some kind of weird pie crust that came pre-made in sticks like butter.

I still keep clams in the can on hand to whip together a fast clam chowder for lunch.

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Response to Vinca (Reply #23)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 09:03 AM

49. Yes! How do you make a quick clam chowder?

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #49)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 01:41 PM

61. It's really easy and surprisingly good.

Saute 3 strips of bacon in a pan until barely crisp and remove to paper towels. Add a small, chopped onion to a little bit of the bacon fat and saute until just translucent. Drain 2 cans of baby clams and add the clam juice to the onions. Chop 3 medium potatoes into cubes and add to the onions and clam juice, cover and cook on low-medium burner until fork tender. Finally add the drained clams, a can of cream of celery soup and a cup of half and half or light cream or half heavy cream/half milk. Throw in a T. of butter and season with pepper and a little dried dill. Cook for 15 - 20 minutes on low heat. Makes 2 - 3 servings (or more if you're not pigs like we are).

After I drain the clams I usually rinse them in cold water to be sure any remaining grit is gone. This is the only recipe I ever make using canned soup since I like everything from scratch, but this is a keeper. Obviously you can double it.

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Response to Vinca (Reply #61)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 02:11 PM

62. Have you tried it without the cream of celery soup? This is

actually how I make full blown clam chowder except add celery at first saute. When I go home the groceries have containers of shucked clams which is great...but still have to use the clam juice in bottles.

Are u from New England too?

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #62)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 02:42 PM

66. I think I must have, but after I tried this recipe I just kept making it.

I was born and raised in Vermont and every summer as a child I spent time in York Beach, Maine. My grandparents rented a cottage. Great memories. My brother lives in Portland, Maine. What I like better than chowder is a great, big pot of steamers and a bowl of melted butter. Haven't had those in awhile.

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Response to Vinca (Reply #66)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 04:01 PM

68. That sounds fantastic. We still go to shore every

summer but in CT. You are right there's just something so idylic and simple about that summer lifestyle. It is so great to see kids just enjoying life...digging for clams, riding bikes, building sand castles. Steamers ! And corn on cob and lobster. But my favorite is fried clam bellies! $17 a container now!

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #68)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 04:36 PM

69. I love those, too. This summer I'm definitely going over there to sit on the beach and

stuff my face with fried clams. My birthday is next month and my brother usually sends live lobsters, so there's that to look forward to.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:05 PM

25. Canned pudding? That's a new one to me. Guess

We made it from "scratch" i.e.used the envelope but cooked in pot with milk.

You brought back real memories. Thanks so much!! Grew up in New England so had fresh fish...on Fridays being Catholic.

But totally remember the ham in the can ! And the frozen juice. Had to find frozen lime juice recently and had to ask where the section was.

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Response to Laura PourMeADrink (Reply #25)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 12:01 AM

36. My husband had never had tuna casserole before we met

We were Catholic and he was Protestant. We often had tuna casserole on Fridays growing up. I always thought of it as sort of a Catholic thing.

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #36)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 12:42 AM

38. Interesting. Where's he from? Wonder if all that

Friday fish helped our health overall?

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:19 PM

26. My fish came every Friday in the form of sticks.

Fish sticks.

Heh

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:22 PM

28. Frozen vegetables were a major breakthrough.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:27 PM

29. I remember all of those things!

There was also the oleomargarine that came in a plastic packet with a dye bubble that you had to pop and knead it all together in the plastic packet so it would be yellow like butter. Most vegetables were canned. My little brother and I discovered that canned peas, when thrown at the bathroom mirror, made a satisfying splat. Milk was delivered in glass bottles with foil tops (the milkman would leave it in an insulated metal box outside the back door). My mom would hand me a quarter and have me walk the two blocks to the bakery to buy a large loaf of fresh sliced white bread, but I actually preferred Wonder Bread because you could mold it into squishy balls. We made Kool-Aid to sell for a nickel a glass but you had to add your own sugar in those days.

Dinners always consisted of some kind of meat, some kind of potatoes, some kind of green (or greenish, if canned) vegetables and a salad. We could not leave the table until everyone had finished, and we were not allowed to watch television while eating dinner.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #29)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 12:49 AM

39. Omg...bread balls...hadn't thought of that in forever!

You aren't my sister or brother are you? Exactly what we had every night. Meat or fish, starch, vegetable and salad. And milk?

Have a distinct memory of refusing to eat my frozen peas and just sitting at the table and only got off because it was PTA night at school.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #29)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 12:48 PM

59. I made Kook-aid for my son

and that was in the 90s.

Instead of adding the full cup of sugar, I used 3/4 of a cup.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:39 PM

30. Never had canned ham

My mother hated to cook, but she had to feed me, my sister,and my dad every night.

I remember lots of things made with ground beef - meat loaf, Swiss steak, chili, sloppy Joes, etc. We ate what my father liked. He hated both spaghetti and macaroni, which he called “noodles”. We had spaghetti when my father wasn’t going to be home for dinner and my mother ordered it from a takeout place. We rarely had Jello, she didn’t want to go to the bother of making it. I remember being forced to eat canned fruit and to this day I hate it. Those stringy pears!! I did like chicken but we only had it very rarely since my father didn’t like it. No tossed salads. I don’t ever remember my mom making a cake or cookies. Breakfast was always cold cereal. No pancakes or waffles or eggs or anything like that. Occasionally my parents ate soft boiled eggs. Soup was always Campbell’s. I liked cooking class in school ( back then all girls had to take cooking class) and learned how to make simple pies, French toast, rice pudding, and things like that. My mom was only too happy to let me and my sister take over the cooking once we got old enough. The first time I made soup from scratch, I couldn’t believe anyone would eat the canned stuff!

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #30)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 12:51 AM

40. Only Campbell's I liked..cream of asparagus and turkey noodle.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Mon Jan 6, 2020, 11:50 PM

32. And you mixed mayonnaise with everything! One of the basic food groups!

You prepared tuna with mayonnaise.
You prepared deviled eggs with mayonnaise.
You prepared potato salad with mayonnaise.
You grated cheese and mixed it with mayonnaise for a tasty sandwich spread.
You mixed the last shavings of roast beef with mayonnaise and pickles, again for a sandwich spread.
And of course you put mayonnaise on your burger and lunch meat sandwich.

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Response to catrose (Reply #32)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 12:03 AM

37. Oh yes, mayonnaise!

Although my mother never made any of those things you mentioned.... but it was a given that you put it on a sandwich.

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Response to catrose (Reply #32)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 12:52 AM

41. We were a miracle whip family. Have no idea why.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 01:45 AM

43. Canned vegetables - yuck! Especially canned...

...peas -
...succotash -
...creamed corn -
...creamed mixed vegetables - (the same goes for cream of vegetable soup - blecchhh!)

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Response to 3catwoman3 (Reply #43)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 09:05 AM

50. Succotash to me came straight from the devil. Even had a creepy name.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 03:02 AM

44. The first time I saw yogurt was in 1958

My mother brought it home regularly. The brand was called “Yami Yogurt” and came in three different flavors: strawberry, orange and vanilla. It was kind of sour tasting because it was low in sugar. Nevertheless, I loved it.

Hard to believe there’s so many brands today in so many different flavors and configurations. I’m sure the kind I had back in the day was a lot healthier.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 10:02 AM

51. Roman Meal bread.

When we could afford it.

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Response to Chipper Chat (Reply #51)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 10:03 AM

52. And then along came....Hawaiian Punch.

The gods delivered.

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Response to Chipper Chat (Reply #51)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 10:14 AM

53. We got the knockoff brand

Norman Mill. Us kids would roll our eyes and look forward to white bread again!
Also oil popped popcorn was an exciting treat especially when my dad brought out the slide projector!

I’m enjoying this thread! Thanks for posting!

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 10:33 AM

54. The only appetizers were cheese and pimento spread on crackers. And only for very special

occasions. And we ate out only about once a month, if that. It was a real treat to go to a restaurant

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Response to Cousin Dupree (Reply #54)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 02:22 PM

64. What? No Lipton's onion soup mixed with sour cream?

We only had it on holidays or when it was my mom's turn to host the girl's card party. That was like heaven. Canned crab on a tiny Pepperidge Farm roll.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 12:25 PM

58. Living on the coast was better. We had fresh fish & fresh shellfish often.

We also grew a lot of our own veggies, always tomatoes, carrots, beans, green peppers & jalapeños and we had a pecan tree so always had those as well. My mom was raised during the depression and they had no money to buy food, had to grew their own, so really always appreciated fresh food, It wasn't common back in the day, but mom was ahead of her time in that way.

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Response to lark (Reply #58)

Tue Jan 7, 2020, 02:26 PM

65. Yes and still can remember the taste and smell of a tomato

you picked and walked into the house and cut and salted. Or the crispy snap green beans that don't seem to exist anymore. Swordfish my favorite still.

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