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Fri Dec 16, 2011, 03:19 PM

A rather rare occurrence in Michigan for December. I'm going to harvest leeks tomorrow.

Ordinarily by now, they would be frozen into the ground, and probably damaged to the point of being largely unusable by cold. But, we're having such a mild fall, that they look beautiful and pristine.

So, I have about 3 dozen nice leeks that I intend to dig tomorrow and store in the fridge in "greenbags" after I trim them up. They seem to keep a very long time this way, and will be nice for winter cooking.

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Reply A rather rare occurrence in Michigan for December. I'm going to harvest leeks tomorrow. (Original post)
Denninmi Dec 2011 OP
NRaleighLiberal Dec 2011 #1
Denninmi Dec 2011 #2
Vanje Dec 2011 #3
Denninmi Dec 2011 #4
dmosh42 Dec 2011 #5
Denninmi Dec 2011 #6
dmosh42 Dec 2011 #7
Kolesar Dec 2011 #8

Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Fri Dec 16, 2011, 04:47 PM

1. Oh, I can taste that potato leek soup now....loaf of warm crusty bread....

Great news - I've not tried to grow leeks in many years. But we love them!

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #1)

Fri Dec 16, 2011, 05:25 PM

2. Well, I have hundreds of them. Most of them are feral.

I haven't actually planted and used them for years, mostly just let them grow because they're so pretty, and they bloom at a good time here, mid July, when other things are starting to peter out.

This year, I picked up a small bundle of transplants when I was buying onion transplants at the feed store. I divided them into two groups. The first group is in planted at the base of a young pear tree, and I don't want them flopping all over next year, so I'm going to dig and eat them. The others can stay and bloom next year with the rest.

I like the flavor of them. My objection is its hard to get the grit out of them. I think I solved that issue finally -- putting them through the food processor with the thin slicing blade yields paper thin slices that don't hold onto grit after several washings.

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Sun Dec 18, 2011, 07:29 PM

3. You go out into your yard and just take a leeK!??

In Winter!?

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Response to Vanje (Reply #3)

Sun Dec 18, 2011, 08:28 PM

4. Well, I do try to be discrete.

Wouldn't want the neighbors to talk.

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Response to Denninmi (Reply #4)

Mon Dec 19, 2011, 01:08 PM

5. Yeah, I like my leeks too, but I(NC) don't get the real hard freeze like Michigan...

so I can dig them as I need them through the winter. Then I re-plant in the Spring and start all over. We usually just wrap them in paper towels, and then into the fridge. What are the 'greenbags'?

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Response to dmosh42 (Reply #5)

Mon Dec 19, 2011, 01:42 PM

6. Greenbags are specially treated storage bags for produce.

They have a compound in them that absorbs ethylene, the gas that makes produce rot. They work great. I buy a dollar store generic version that is about a tenth of the cost of the original Debby Meyer brand. They really extend the life of produce in the fridge -- I've kept things like lettuce about 4 weeks, and apples and pears for a year, nice and fresh.

Pretty much any grocery store will have some version of these now -- the major manufacturers like Glad and Reynolds have hopped on the bandwagon. Dollar stores sell a generic version as I said. Kroger stores here now even have a version of these in the produce department for the bulk items, but they are thinner than the purchased version.

http://www.amazon.com/Debbie-Meyer-20317-Green-Bags/dp/B0011TMP3Y

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Response to Denninmi (Reply #6)

Mon Dec 19, 2011, 02:53 PM

7. Ok, thanks for the tip. I'll give them a try.

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Tue Dec 20, 2011, 05:14 PM

8. I harvested ten onions yesterday

They were so tiny that I did not harvest them in September. They grew from the size of a marble to the size of a ping pong ball in the last three months. This has been a warm fall in Ohio like you have had in Michigan.

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