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Mon Apr 29, 2013, 12:13 PM

We have a very late spring here and have decided to let the garden go fallow this year instead of

our usual. What seeds could be planted to enhance the soil this summer?

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Arrow 4 replies Author Time Post
Reply We have a very late spring here and have decided to let the garden go fallow this year instead of (Original post)
jwirr Apr 2013 OP
ginnyinWI Apr 2013 #1
Curmudgeoness Apr 2013 #2
The Velveteen Ocelot Apr 2013 #3
BlueToTheBone Jun 2013 #4

Response to jwirr (Original post)

Mon Apr 29, 2013, 12:43 PM

1. Rye? Not sure.

It sounds like a plan: my last two gardens have been really poor, partly due to drought. Maybe I'll just plant a row or two this year.

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Response to jwirr (Original post)

Mon Apr 29, 2013, 07:24 PM

2. I would suggest clover.

Clover is a nitrogen-fixing plant, so can help add nitrogen to the soil. You want to plant it soon though, this is the time to plant it.

Clover plants have a symbiotic relationship with a bacterium in the Rhizobium genus that allows them to fix atmospheric nitrogen and provide for their own nitrogen needs, which is why clover can maintain a dark green color even under low nitrogen fertility. Turfgrass growing in soil that is low in nitrogen may receive supplemental nitrogen from old clover plants as their roots die and decay.


http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7490.html

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Response to jwirr (Original post)

Mon Apr 29, 2013, 07:59 PM

3. A legume, like clover or lupine, to fix nitrogen.

There are some pretty, very decorative legumes you could plant to brighten up the garden while they improve the soil. Cultivars of the lupine family are quite attractive, as are varieties of Baptisia (false or wild indigo), which also attract butterflies.

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Response to jwirr (Original post)

Thu Jun 13, 2013, 08:31 AM

4. fava beans fix nitrogen

when you're ready to work the garden again, pull them (lots of work) and knock the nitrogen back into the soil.

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