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Sun Sep 14, 2014, 05:42 PM

 

Compost. At the end of the season my squash leaves get a powdery, I assume fungus, on them.

I would love the green of the vines and leaves for my compost (I always need nitrogen) but don't want to polute it with a fungus that may return next year. When my tomatoes get the blight I send the plants to yardwaste heaven.

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Reply Compost. At the end of the season my squash leaves get a powdery, I assume fungus, on them. (Original post)
rhett o rick Sep 2014 OP
The Velveteen Ocelot Sep 2014 #1
rhett o rick Sep 2014 #2
The Velveteen Ocelot Sep 2014 #3
rhett o rick Sep 2014 #4
alfie Sep 2014 #5
rhett o rick Sep 2014 #7
Elad Sep 2014 #6
rhett o rick Sep 2014 #8
sadoldgirl Sep 2014 #9
rhett o rick Sep 2014 #10


Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #1)

Sun Sep 14, 2014, 06:13 PM

2. Thanks for the link. It didn't mention composting so I will continue to look. nm

 

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Response to rhett o rick (Reply #2)

Sun Sep 14, 2014, 06:16 PM

3. Probably composting is not a good idea.

The powdery mildew spore can overwinter and survive in compost. It's always around anyhow - my Monarda always gets it no matter what I do - but why encourage it?

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Sun Sep 14, 2014, 06:18 PM

4. I feel the same way but hate losing all that great green for my compost. nm

 

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Response to rhett o rick (Original post)

Sun Sep 14, 2014, 06:54 PM

5. Any coffee shops around?

I get all the coffee grounds I can use from a coffee shop. Next to fresh grass clippings that seems to be the best source of greens I can get.

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Response to alfie (Reply #5)

Sun Sep 14, 2014, 08:05 PM

7. I do compost our coffee grounds but I am surprised that they contain nitrogen.

 

I will consider talking to the ladies down at the Java Juggs and see what they have. With regard to coffee grounds, where's your mind. I will simply tell my wife that you told me too.

All seriousness aside I will look into that. During Spring and Summer I have a lot of green lawn clippings etc. but during the winter I get way more browns.

Thanks again

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Response to rhett o rick (Original post)

Sun Sep 14, 2014, 07:03 PM

6. Powdery mildew is omnipresent.

Composting with those leaves won't hurt anything, as it'll come back to your garden no matter what. What happens is that your squash plant loses the ability to fight it off as it ages and winds down it's life cycle. Dehydration can stress it so that it gets infected too. But it doesn't matter what you do, towards fall it'll kill off your plant, but just be aware that the plant was already done anyway. The only time it's an issue is if your plant is too weak to stay healthy and then it will succumb too early, but the solution to that is obviously just to raise a healthy, hydrated, fed plant - not worry about your compost.

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Response to Elad (Reply #6)

Sun Sep 14, 2014, 08:08 PM

8. Thanks a lot. That's the answer I wanted. Generally I keep asking the question until

 

I find the answer I like.

Series-ously what you say makes sense. I will still ship out tomato plants with blight as I believe it can get in the soil and be a bigger problem.

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Response to rhett o rick (Original post)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 07:27 PM

9. Small suggestion if you want the leaves for compost

Take them off and bake them for one hour at 220 degrees. The Nitrogen will still be there and you even get rid of a lot of viruses.

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Response to sadoldgirl (Reply #9)

Thu Sep 18, 2014, 07:41 PM

10. Thanks but that's not very practical as I have about a garbage cans worth. nm

 

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