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Sun Oct 19, 2014, 09:48 AM

Indoor plants that need little sunlight

I have 2 big windows face north. Each gets only a couple of hours of direct sunlight.

Would like suggestions what to grow in window. It must be something that doesn't get too big, as will have plants on a plank near window.

also if there are any suggestions for something that will get large, can grow elsewhere in the apartment. Again, no direct sunlight.

all must be easy to survive.
I am an excellent gardener outdoors, but have not had success with indoor plants.

thanks.

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Arrow 23 replies Author Time Post
Reply Indoor plants that need little sunlight (Original post)
ellenrr Oct 2014 OP
femmocrat Oct 2014 #1
ginnyinWI Oct 2014 #4
Major Nikon Oct 2014 #2
hlthe2b Oct 2014 #3
ellenrr Oct 2014 #7
hlthe2b Oct 2014 #8
ellenrr Oct 2014 #9
ginnyinWI Oct 2014 #5
ellenrr Oct 2014 #6
dixiegrrrrl Oct 2014 #10
ellenrr Oct 2014 #12
ellenrr Oct 2014 #14
dixiegrrrrl Oct 2014 #16
Elad Oct 2014 #11
ellenrr Oct 2014 #13
ellenrr Oct 2014 #15
dixiegrrrrl Oct 2014 #17
ellenrr Oct 2014 #18
ellenrr Nov 2014 #19
blackcrowflies Nov 2014 #20
ellenrr Nov 2014 #21
ellenrr Nov 2014 #22
blackcrowflies Nov 2014 #23

Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 09:57 AM

1. Old favorites:

Snake plant (practically indestructible) :



And Pothos: (will even grow in water for long time):



I also have a pony-tail palm and a peperomia (sp?) that are doing ok in low light.

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Response to femmocrat (Reply #1)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 10:19 AM

4. that's what first came to my mind, too.

I have had the same plant going for over 30 years. It has been divided and trimmed. I think I have three pots of it now, and have given divisions of it away several times. Relatively slow growing and you can ignore it for weeks.

Philodendrons don't need much light, but they will spread all over the place.

I have a Jade plant growing in a north window too. And my Christmas cactus seems to be doing fine.

Also African violets. They will grow in dim light, but may not bloom unless your two hours a day are enough for them. It probably is--they are evolved to grow under trees in the forest.

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Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 09:58 AM

2. Saintpaulia, AKA African Violets are a good choice

There are dwarf versions available that can be as small as you want (and perhaps smaller).

http://www.optimara.com/africanvioletcare1.html

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Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 10:01 AM

3. english ivy, golden pathos, corn plant, bamboo, chinese evergreen

many herbs..

I have a chinese evergreen in a pink/green variety that is really pretty--in a corner of my living room that gets very little light and is doing great...

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #3)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 10:46 AM

7. I like the sound of 'chinese evergeen' so I looked for an image

and found this info:

"This easy-to-care-for plant can help filter out a variety of air pollutants and begins to remove more toxins as time and exposure continues. Even with low light, it will produce blooms and red berries"

Read more: http://www.mnn.com/health/healthy-spaces/photos/15-houseplants-for-improving-indoor-air-quality/chinese-evergreen#ixzz3GbP3iEqZ

I didn't see any pink and green, what kind is yours?

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Response to ellenrr (Reply #7)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 12:04 PM

8. It is a special varient that nurseries will sometimes carry....

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #8)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 12:06 PM

9. oh that's lovely. nt

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Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 10:22 AM

5. Philodendrons would work well in a hanging basket in a corner of the room. n/t

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Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 10:43 AM

6. thanks all. nt

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Response to ellenrr (Reply #6)

Sun Oct 19, 2014, 05:12 PM

10. Do you heat with gas?

Often indoor plants fail because of gas heat.
My indoor plants are limited because of our heat, but we are blessed with double paned walls of windows facing south, so in fall-winter lots of sunlight.


I have several split-leaf philodendron in large pots, they like bright shade and warm temps
and several forms of Liriope muscari, a striped leaf clumping grass that is small enough for keeping in the house all year round.
check those out and see if they will work.
Also asparagus fern makes a nice hanging plant...

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #10)

Wed Oct 22, 2014, 06:18 AM

12. yeah, in winter indoor heat can be drying.

I have electric heat.
I've been having good luck keeping some cut plants from my garden alive and looking good in water, by changing the water daily and spraying them daily with water. The chocolate mint developed a huge root system in water, surprised me, bec. I didn't have it in natural light. Had it on the table under a lamp. I guess mint will grown anywhere. I am going to put it in soil and see how it goes. thanks for suggestions.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #10)

Wed Oct 22, 2014, 06:20 AM

14. does 'bright shade' mean a lot of indirect sun?

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Response to ellenrr (Reply #14)

Wed Oct 22, 2014, 06:45 AM

16. Yes....

It can be filtered shade, or it can be a bright spot in the room that does not get burning rays of sun.
In winter, plants can be nearer to a sunny window because of the angle of the sun then.

Your plants will tell you, if you try out a few areas, what they like.

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Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Mon Oct 20, 2014, 02:49 PM

11. Spider plants are easy ones.

Nearly impossible to kill as long as you have minimal care and no direct sunlight needed.

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Response to Elad (Reply #11)

Wed Oct 22, 2014, 06:18 AM

13. thanks. adding to my list. :) nt

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Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Wed Oct 22, 2014, 06:40 AM

15. Anybody grow dracaena?

I like the look of it.
The instructions I found say, "bright area, avoid direct sunlight"

My windows are north-facing (sun in early morning only).
Wonder if that would be considered "bright"?

Probably not.

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Response to ellenrr (Reply #15)

Wed Oct 22, 2014, 06:48 AM

17. Avoid direct sunlight means the leaves will burn.

Filtered sunlight, like thru a white curtain, will do.

Thing about houseplants is that in winter, we like to be where they like to be...next to a sunny warm window.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #17)

Wed Oct 22, 2014, 07:29 AM

18. so does my cat ;)

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Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Mon Nov 3, 2014, 06:48 AM

19. so yesterday my first foray into buying indoor plants:

I got Warneckii Dracaena, Zamioculcas zamiifolia (ZZ), Chinese evergreen. and Majesty Palm.

Dracena and Palm I'm returning. The Palm bec. I read it is not rec. as a house plant. (this particular variety that I bought is not) and Dracena bec. once I got it home, I realized the leaves are turning brown, also bec. I don't like it.

I love the Chinese evergreen, and ZZ. Hope they will thrive.

Plus I had bought 4 cacti - don't know what kind - no labels, but all very cute, and today will repot them with cactus soil.

I moved a table near the window where now the cacti and the chocolate mint that I potted up are.
Looks good.

I'm gonna have to think about whether or not I want large plants. I live in a small one-bedroom, so when the palm first came in, I was quite overwhelmed. (It is about 3 foot high).
But before I decided to return, I had found a corner where I think it would be quite comfortable.

so am still feeling my way into indoor planthood.

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Response to ellenrr (Original post)

Wed Nov 19, 2014, 10:27 AM

20. camellia

 

I've had a camellia growing inside since April. Yes, they are shrubs, but very, very slow growing. They like near-shade. It's too cold here to grow them outside, but I'll have croaked before it gets too big for indoors. I bought it from almostedenplants.com for $9.99 and it arrived about a foot and a half high.

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Response to blackcrowflies (Reply #20)

Fri Nov 21, 2014, 07:49 AM

21. what a beautiful flower!

The state flower of Alabama.

I would never have thot I could grow something that beautiful indoors.
thanks for the suggestion.

I am thinking about it, and doing some research.

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Response to blackcrowflies (Reply #20)

Fri Nov 21, 2014, 07:50 AM

22. PS - does it smell good?

It looks like it would have a beautiful aroma.

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Response to ellenrr (Reply #22)

Fri Nov 21, 2014, 04:50 PM

23. the two I know well

 

alas do not have any fragrance.

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